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Christianity in Indonesia: Wikis

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Christianity in Indonesia is a minority religion. About 5.85 % of the population of Indonesia are Protestants and about 3 % are Catholics.

Christians were already present in modern day Indonesia in the 10th to 11th century.[1] Protestantism was first introduced by the Dutch in the sixteenth century, resulting in Calvinist and Lutheran influence. The first Roman Catholics arrived in 1534, in the Maluku islands. They were Portuguese that were sent for exploration. Francis Xavier, a Roman Catholic missionary and co-founder of the Jesuit Order worked in the Maluku islands from 1546 to 1547. Julius Darmaatmadja is the only current Cardinal in Indonesia. He is the archbishop of Jakarta.

In the 1960s due to anti-Communist and anti-Confucian legislation many Communists and Chinese claimed to be Christians. Christians in Indonesia are more free to practice their religion compared to several countries such as China, Malaysia, and some Arab countries. In Papua and North Sulawesi provinces Protestants form the majority of the population. Large populations of Christians are also found around Lake Toba in North Sumatra, Nusa Tenggara Timur, Tana Toraja inland, and Maluku.

Even after the Muslim-Christian conflict in the Moluccas has subsided, Christians are victims of minor, but regular attacks by radical Muslim organizations such as the Islamic Defenders Front (FPI).[2]

References

  1. ^ Adolf Heuken. Ensiklopedi Gereja (2005)
  2. ^ International Religious Freedom Report 2007, 2008, and 2009

See also


Christianity by Country

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Christianity in Indonesia is a minority religion. About 5.85 % of the population of Indonesia are Protestants and about 3 % are Catholics.

Christians were already present in modern day Indonesia in the 10th to 11th century.[1] Protestantism was first introduced by the Dutch in the sixteenth century, resulting in Calvinist and Lutheran influence. The first Roman Catholics arrived in 1534, in the Maluku islands. They were Portuguese that were sent for exploration. Francis Xavier, a Roman Catholic missionary and co-founder of the Jesuit Order worked in the Maluku islands from 1546 to 1547. Julius Darmaatmadja is the only current Cardinal in Indonesia. He is the archbishop of Jakarta.

In the 1960s due to anti-Communist and anti-Confucian legislation many Communists and Chinese claimed to be Christians. Christians in Indonesia are more free to practice their religion compared to several countries such as China, Malaysia, and some Arab countries. In Papua and North Sulawesi provinces Protestants form the majority of the population. Large populations of Christians are also found around Lake Toba in North Sumatra, Nusa Tenggara Timur, Tana Toraja inland, and Maluku. Although predominantly Muslim Indonesia, the missionaries remain free to spread the Christian religion in Indonesia. And many Christian schools that teach the Christian religion. Protestants in Indonesia consists of various denominations, namely the Batak Christian Protestant Church, Pentecostalism, Charismatic Christianity, Seventh-day Adventist Church, True Jesus Church, Mennonite, Methodism, Baptists, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Simalungun Protestant Christian Church, Syriac Orthodox Church, and other denominations.

Even after the Muslim-Christian conflict in the Moluccas has subsided, Christians are victims of minor, but regular attacks by radical Muslim organizations such as the Islamic Defenders Front (FPI).[2]

References

  1. ^ Adolf Heuken. Ensiklopedi Gereja (2005). See Also Adolf Heuken, "Chapter One: Christianity in Pre-Colonial Indonesia", in A History of Christianity in Indonesia, eds. Jan Aritonang and Karel Steenbrink, pgs. 3-7, Leiden/Boston: Brill, 2008, ISBN: 9789004170261
  2. ^ International Religious Freedom Report 2007, 2008, and 2009

See also


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