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Chromium carbide[1]
Cr3C2structure.jpg
IUPAC name
Identifiers
CAS number 12012-35-0
PubChem 3650773
Properties
Molecular formula Cr3C2
Molar mass 180.009 g/mol
Appearance gray orthorhombic crystals
Density 6.68 g/cm3
Melting point

1895°C

Structure
Crystal structure Orthorhombic, oP20
Space group Pnma, No. 62
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C, 100 kPa)
Infobox references

Chromium carbide (Cr3C2) is an extremely hard refractory ceramic material. It is usually processed by sintering. It has the appearance of a gray powder with orthorhombic crystal structure. The orthorhombic Cr3C2 occurs extremely rarely as mineral tongbaite.

Other compositions are available, eg. Cr23C6 (occurring as extremely rare mineral isovite, cubic) and Cr7C3.

Chromium carbide is used as a thermal spray material for protecting the underlying metal surface, and as an additive to corrosion-resistant and wear-resistant materials. It is used in coatings of bearings, seals, orifices, and valve seals, and as a fine-crystal phase in other sintered carbides, where, like the vanadium carbide, it inhibits growth of submicrometre grains during pressing and sintering. It is highly corrosion-resistant, and does not oxidize even at high temperature (1000-1100 °C). The powder for coating costs $40-$65 per pound.

The thermal expansion coefficient of chromium carbide is almost equal to that of steel, reducing the mechanical stress buildup at the layer boundary.

Precipitation of chromium carbide at the grain boundaries, depleting the grain edges of chromium, is the cause of intergranular corrosion of stainless steel near the welds.

References

  1. ^ Lide, David R. (1998), Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (87 ed.), Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, pp. 4–52, ISBN 0849305942  

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