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Cinema of Latvia
Latviafilm.png
Timeline of Latvian cinema
List of Latvian films
Category:Cinema of Latvia
Category:Latvian films
Category:Latvian film awards
Category:Latvian film actors
Category:Latvian film directors

Cinema of Latvia dates back to 1910 when the first short films were made.[1]. The first cinematic screening in Riga took place on May 28, 1896. [2] By 1914 all major cities in Latvia had cinemas where newsreels, documentaries and mostly foreign made short films were screened.

Two years after cinema was invented by Lumiere brothers, on 22 January, 1898 Sergei Eisenstein was born in Riga, the capital of Latvia nowadays.

The first Latvian feature film Lāčplēsis directed by Aleksandris Rusteikis was released in 1930. The Fisherman's Son (1939) directed by Emmy Award nominee (1975) [3] Vilis Lapenieks is considered a Latvian classic ending the era of filmmaking before the outbreak of WW II.[1]

After the Soviet occupation of Latvia in 1940 Vilis Lapenieks emigrated and after the end of the war continued his film-making career abroad where he has been credited internationally as cinematographer on more than 63 titles.[4]

The Riga Documentary Film Studio was created in Latvia during the first year of Soviet occupation. During the first decades of Soviet rule filmmakers in Latvia were coming mostly from Soviet Russia creating propaganda films to depict the victory of Socialism.

After the death of Stalin in 1953 a more liberal period in Soviet Union's cultural policies followed. Filmmakers started to enjoy greater artistic control at the same time the Soviet State Committee for Cinematography (Goskino) in Moscow provided the money, state censorship body Glavlit and CPSU Department of Culture had the control over releasing the movies.[1]

The first Latvain feature films produced during the era still had to meet the ideological requirements of the Soviet regime: The Story of a Latvian Rifleman (1957) directed by Pavels Armands and Tobago Changes Its Cource (1965) directed by Aleksandras Leimais were produced.

In 1963 the Riga Film Studio completed the construction of 1890 m2 film studios complex.[2]

In the 1970's Aleksandras Leimais and Gunārs Pieses became the most popular directors in Latvia making a series of historical adventure films. Put, vejini (Blow, Wind) (1973) directed by Pieses is a movie based on a story of Latvians popular author Jānis Streičs. Naves ena (In the Shadow of Death) (1971) is adopted from a story by Rudolfs Blaumanis. One of the most popular films from the era is Limuzīns Jāņu Nakts Krāsā (Limousine the Color of St. John's Night) (1981) , a light parody on the Soviet system [1]

Other most notable Latvian directors from the era are Aivars Freimanis, Rolands Kalnins and Andris Grinbergs. Latvias top film actors during the era were Eduards Pavuls, Lilita Berzina, Gunars Cilinskis and Karl Sebris.

After Latvia regained independence in 1991, the most successful Latvian filmmakers have been Janis Streics receiving Rights of the Child Award (1994) at the Chicago International Children's Film Festival for Cilveka berns (1991) [5]; Janis Putnins the winner of the Best Film and Best Screenplay at the Latvian National Film Festival in 2007 for Vogelfrei (2007) [6]; Varis Brasla whos Ziemassvetku jampadracis (1996) has won Children's Film Award at Würzburg International Filmweekend, the Children's Jury Award at the Chicago International Children's Film Festival. [7]; Aivars Freimanis a nominee for International Independent Award at the International Filmfestival Mannheim-Heidelberg[8]; Una Celma Honorable Mention at the Uppsala International Short Film Festival in 2001; [9]; Viesturs Kairiss whose debut feature film Pa celam aizejot (2001) won the Jury Prize at the Raindance Film Festival in 2002. [10]; and Laila Pakalnina, a winner of several film awards, a nominee for the Golden Berlin Bear at the Berlin International Film Festival for Udens (2006). [11]

References

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Cinema of Latvia dates back to 1910 when the first short films were made.[1]. The first cinematic screening in Riga took place on May 28, 1896.[2] By 1914 all major cities in Latvia had cinemas where newsreels, documentaries and mostly foreign made short films were screened.

Two years after cinema was invented by Lumiere brothers, on 22 January 1898 Sergei Eisenstein was born in Riga, the capital of Latvia nowadays.

The first Latvian feature film Lāčplēsis directed by Aleksandris Rusteikis was released in 1930. The Fisherman's Son (1939) directed by Emmy Award nominee (1975) [3] Vilis Lapenieks is considered a Latvian classic ending the era of filmmaking before the outbreak of WW II.[1]

After the Soviet occupation of Latvia in 1940 Vilis Lapenieks emigrated and after the end of the war continued his film-making career abroad where he has been credited internationally as cinematographer on more than 63 titles.[4]

The Riga Documentary Film Studio was created in Latvia during the first year of Soviet occupation. During the first decades of Soviet rule filmmakers in Latvia were coming mostly from Soviet Russia creating propaganda films to depict the victory of Socialism.

After the death of Stalin in 1953 a more liberal period in Soviet Union's cultural policies followed. Filmmakers started to enjoy greater artistic control at the same time the Soviet State Committee for Cinematography (Goskino) in Moscow provided the money, state censorship body Glavlit and CPSU Department of Culture had the control over releasing the movies.[1]

The first Latvian feature films produced during the era still had to meet the ideological requirements of the Soviet regime: The Story of a Latvian Rifleman (1957) directed by Pavels Armands and Tobago Changes Its Cource (1965) directed by Aleksandras Leimais were produced.

In 1963 the Riga Film Studio completed the construction of 1890 m2 film studios complex.[2]

In the 1970s Aleksandras Leimais and Gunārs Pieses became the most popular directors in Latvia making a series of historical adventure films. Put, vejini (Blow, Wind) (1973) directed by Pieses is a movie based on a story of Latvians popular author Jānis Streičs. Naves ena (In the Shadow of Death) (1971) is adopted from a story by Rudolfs Blaumanis. One of the most popular films from the era is Limuzīns Jāņu Nakts Krāsā (Limousine the Color of St. John's Night) (1981) , a light parody on the Soviet system [1]

Other most notable Latvian directors from the era are Aivars Freimanis, Rolands Kalnins and Andris Grinbergs. Latvias top film actors during the era were Eduards Pavuls, Lilita Berzina, Gunars Cilinskis and Karl Sebris.

After Latvia regained independence in 1991, the most successful Latvian filmmakers have been Janis Streics receiving Rights of the Child Award (1994) at the Chicago International Children's Film Festival for Cilveka berns (1991) [5]; Janis Putnins the winner of the Best Film and Best Screenplay at the Latvian National Film Festival in 2007 for Vogelfrei (2007) [6]; Varis Brasla whose Ziemassvetku jampadracis (1996) has won Children's Film Award at Würzburg International Filmweekend, the Children's Jury Award at the Chicago International Children's Film Festival.[7]; Aivars Freimanis a nominee for International Independent Award at the International Filmfestival Mannheim-Heidelberg[8]; Una Celma Honorable Mention at the Uppsala International Short Film Festival in 2001;[9]; Viesturs Kairiss whose debut feature film Pa celam aizejot (2001) won the Jury Prize at the Raindance Film Festival in 2002.[10]; and Laila Pakalnina, a winner of several film awards, a nominee for the Golden Berlin Bear at the Berlin International Film Festival for Udens (2006).[11]

See also

References


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