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Clayton County, Georgia
Map of Georgia highlighting Clayton County
Location in the state of Georgia
Map of the U.S. highlighting Georgia
Georgia's location in the U.S.
Seat Jonesboro
Largest city Forest Park
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

144 sq mi (374 km²)
143 sq mi (369 km²)
2 sq mi (4 km²), 1.15%
PopulationEst.
 - (2006)
 - Density

271,240
1,658/sq mi (640/km²)
Founded 1858
Congressional districts 5th, 13th
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website www.co.clayton.ga.us

Clayton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. As of 2000, the population was 236,517. The 2008 Census estimate placed the population at 273,718.[1] The county seat is Jonesboro.[2]

Clayton County is a part of the Atlanta Metropolitan Area, and is the county in which most of Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport lies.

The county was established in 1858 and named in honor of Augustin Smith Clayton (1783–1839), who served in the United States House of Representatives from 1832 until 1835.

Contents

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 144 square miles (374 km²), of which, 143 square miles (369 km²) of it is land and 2 square miles (4 km²) of it (1.15%) is water.

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Adjacent counties

Demographics

As of the 2000 census[3], there were 236,517 people, 82,243 households, and 59,214 families residing in the county. The population density was 1,658 people per square mile (640/km²). There were 86,461 housing units at an average density of 606 per square mile (234/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 37.94% White, 51.55% Black or African American, 0.32% Native American, 4.49% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 3.55% from other races, and 2.08% from two or more races. 7.50% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Estimated 2006 population is 271,240, with a racial make-up of 20.4% white non-Hispanic, 62.9% African American, 5% Asian, 11.3% Hispanic or Latino, 0.4% American Indian or Alaska Naive, and 0.1% Pacific Islander. 1.5% were reported as multi-racial.

There were 82,243 households out of which 40.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.70% were married couples living together, 20.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.00% were non-families. 21.80% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.60% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.84 and the average family size was 3.30.

In the county the population was spread out with 30.00% under the age of 18, 10.40% from 18 to 24, 35.40% from 25 to 44, 18.40% from 45 to 64, and 5.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 30 years. For every 100 females there were 94.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $42,697, and the median income for a family was $46,782. Males had a median income of $32,118 versus $26,926 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,079. About 8.20% of families and 10.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.20% of those under age 18 and 8.90% of those age 65 or over.

The last quarter-century has seen significant change in the racial composition of the county's population. In 1980, Clayton county's population was 150,357 — 91% white and 9% minority, [1] while in 2006 the population was approximately 271,240 — 20% white and 80% minority. Many of these minority groups lived in Clayton County's housing projects that were built around the time these minority groups moved to Clayton County; since then many of the housing projects have been redeveloped due to high crime.[4]

Crime

On March 20, 2007, the county appointed its first black police chief, Jeffrey E. Turner, who has promised to help alleviate crime in the county. Areas with the most crime are College Park, Riverdale, Conley, Lovejoy, Forest Park, North Jonesboro, Arrowhead District, and the Pointe South District. Since the change in demographics, crime has increased in Clayton County and many lifelong residents claim it is directly linked to the influx of minorities who are now the majority in the county. While others say that the judicial process in Clayton County does not represent equality because the county has only one minority Judge. The people judging over crimes and disputes in Clayton is not reflective of the population.[5]

The Clayton County Commission voted in December 2009 to oust Turner for various offenses including insubordination, an unorganized evidence room,failure to properly handle sexual harassment complaints against officers,several high-speed chases that resulted in civilian deaths, and 138 unaccounted-for firearms. Though residents rallied in his support, the Commission voted to reassign Turner as the department head for the Academy.[6]

Economy

ValuJet Airlines was headquartered in northern unincorporated Clayton County, near William B. Hartsfield International Airport, in the 1990s.[7]

Cities and towns

Unincorporated areas

  • Rex (unincorporated)
  • Conley (unincorporated)
  • Ellenwood (unincorporated)
  • Irondale (unincorporated)
  • Bonanza (unincorporated)
  • Lake Spivey
  • Clayton Panhandle
  • Old Dixie
  • Mountain View
  • Flintwoods
  • Flint River District
  • Lake Harbin
  • Old South
  • Botany Woods
  • Valley Hill
  • Arrowhead District
  • North Jonesboro

Transportation

Air

Highways

Mass transit

Bus

Clayton County mass transit is run by C-TRAN, with five fixed bus routes and Paratransit
  • 500 - Airport Loop
    501 - S.R. 54/Forest Park/Southlake Mall (Atlanta)/Tara Blvd./Justice Center
    502 - Southlake Pkwy./Jonesboro/Lake City/Courthouse
    503 - Gardenwalk/Southern Regional Medical Center/Morrow/Mt. Zion Pkwy.
    504 - Riverdale Rd./Riverdale/S.R. 85/Flint River Rd./Justice Center
    503 - ShortTurn Southern Regional Hospital/Riverdale/North Jonensboro/Arrowhead District/Upper Riverdale Rd./Arrowhead Blvd.

Rail

There is commuter rail service in the planning stages along the Norfolk Southern line, with proposed stations in Forest Park, Morrow, Jonesboro, and initially ending at Lovejoy. This line is projected to run to Macon eventually. However, it has been repeatedly stalled by the Georgia General Assembly, despite having federal funding already available for it.

The Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority's Airport station is located just barely in Clayton. Buses from Clayton feed into MARTA rail stations in Fulton (College Park and East Point). Clayton is one of three counties with representation on the MARTA board, but no rail service, since voters refused to approve the 1% sales tax needed to fund it.

Culture

Parts of Margaret Mitchell's epic 1936 novel Gone With the Wind and the famous 1939 Gone With The Wind film were set in Clayton County. It was the location of the fictional Tara Plantation, which was the beautiful and spacious cotton plantation where protagonist Scarlett O'Hara lived with her parents and sisters. Tara Boulevard was named for the plantation, and is the main north/south road through the county, carrying U.S. 41 and lesser-known Georgia 3. Alsa a namesake is Tara Field, the county's general aviation airport, actually located in a neighboring county where it was previously Henry County Airport.

Also, parts of the novels Rhett Butler's People and Scarlett and the Scarlett TV Mini-Series took place in Clayton County. Rhett Butler's People is a prequel, sequel, and companion to Gone With The Wind, but the beautiful Tara Plantation was burned down in the end. Scarlett is a sequel to Gone With the Wind, also and also takes place briefly in Clayton County.

In the above mentioned novels, the fictional Twelve Oaks Plantation and others mentioned in the novels above, are located in and around Clayton County.

Education

Primary and secondary schools

The Clayton County School System is the fifth largest in Georgia.[8] On August 28, 2008, the District lost its accreditation, citing a 'dysfunctional' school board.

Higher education

Clayton State University in Morrow is the only four year institution in the county.

Accreditation

The 50,000-student school system was the first in the nation to lose accreditation since 1969. The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) revoked the school district's accreditation on August 28, 2008[9]. This makes only the second system in the nation to do so since 1960. A grand jury investigated and considered possible criminal indictments against the Clayton County School Board. At issue was whether the school board committed malfeasance in ignoring the shortcomings of the school system and violating its own rules concerning the awarding of bids of contracts.

School Board Chairwoman Ericka Davis announced her resignation on April 2, 2008 amidst the allegations. Clayton County Commission Chairman Eldrin Bell has called for the resignations of all Clayton County School Board Members.[10]

Amid controversy and orders for the police to quiet citizens, the Clayton County School Board hired a new temporary superintendent on April 26, 2008. This was despite the fact that the new superintendent did not meet the qualifications set forth by SACS.[11]

Home values were expected to drop substantially following this decision. SACS accreditation was restored provisionally one year later in early May 2009.

References

  1. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Population for Counties of Georgia: April 1, 2000 to July 1, 2007" (.xls). United States Census Bureau. http://www.census.gov/popest/counties/tables/CO-EST2007-01-13.xls.  
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Template.cfm?Section=Find_a_County&Template=/cffiles/counties/usamap.cfm. Retrieved 2008-01-31.  
  3. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31.  
  4. ^ "Clayton County, Georgia". American Factfinder. United States Census Bureau. 2008. http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/DTTable?_bm=y&-context=dt&-ds_name=ACS_2006_EST_G00_&-CONTEXT=dt&-mt_name=ACS_2006_EST_G2000_C03002&-tree_id=306&-redoLog=false&-geo_id=05000US13063&-search_results=01000US&-format=&-_lang=en.  
  5. ^ "Police Administration". Clayton County Georgia Police Department. http://www.claytonpolice.com/Administration.htm. Retrieved 2008-05-04.  
  6. ^ "Turner out as Clayton police chief". The Atlanta Journal Constitution. http://www.ajc.com/news/clayton/turner-out-as-clayton-259697.html. Retrieved 2009-12-28.  
  7. ^ "Civil Action No. 1-96-CV-1355-JTC." Stanford University Law School. Retrieved on May 19, 2009.
  8. ^ "District Statistics". Clayton County Public Schools. http://www.clayton.k12.ga.us/aboutccps/districtstatistics.asp. Retrieved 2008-04-05.  
  9. ^ Matteucci, Megan (2008-08-28). "Clayton schools lose accreditation; board members ousted". Atlanta Journal Constitution. http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/clayton/stories/2008/08/28/clayton_schools_accreditation.html. Retrieved 2008-08-28.  
  10. ^ Matteucci, Megan (2008-04-02). "Clayton school board chairwoman steps down". Atlanta Journal Constitution. http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/clayton/stories/2008/04/02/claytonschools_0402.html. Retrieved 2008-04-05.  
  11. ^ Matteucci, Megan (2008-05-01). "Clayton signs school chief's contract amid police presence". Atlanta Journal Constitution. http://www.ajc.com/metro/content/metro/clayton/stories/2008/04/26/claysuper_0427.html.  

External links

Coordinates: 33°32′N 84°22′W / 33.54°N 84.36°W / 33.54; -84.36


Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

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Clayton County, Georgia
Map
File:Map of Georgia highlighting Clayton County.png
Location in the state of Georgia
Map of the USA highlighting Georgia
Georgia's location in the USA
Statistics
Founded 1858
Seat Jonesboro
Largest City Forest Park
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

 sq mikm²)
 sq mi ( km²)
 sq mi ( km²), 1.15%
wikipedia:Population
 - (2006)
 - Density

271240
Time zone Eastern : UTC-5/-4
Website: www.co.clayton.ga.us

Clayton County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. As of 2000, the population was 236,517. The 2006 Census estimate placed the population at 271,240 [1]. The county seat is Jonesboro6.

Clayton County is included in the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta Metropolitan Statistical Area and is the county in which most of Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport lies.

The county was established in 1858 and named in honor of Augustin Smith Clayton (1783-1839), who served in the United States House of Representatives from 1832 until 1835.

Contents

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 374 km² (144 sq mi). 369 km² (143 sq mi) of it is land and 4 km² (2 sq mi) of it (1.15%) is water.

Adjacent counties

Demographics

As of the census² of 2000, there were 236,517 people, 82,243 households, and 59,214 families residing in the county. The population density was 640/km² (1,658/sq mi). There were 86,461 housing units at an average density of 234/km² (606/sq mi). The racial makeup of the county was 37.9% White, 51.6% Black or African American, 0.32% Native American, 4.49% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 3.55% from other races, and 2.08% from two or more races. 7.50% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 82,243 households out of which 40.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.70% were married couples living together, 20.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.00% were non-families. 21.80% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.60% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.84 and the average family size was 3.30.

In the county the population was spread out with 30.00% under the age of 18, 10.40% from 18 to 24, 35.40% from 25 to 44, 18.40% from 45 to 64, and 5.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 30 years. For every 100 females there were 94.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.90 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $42,697, and the median income for a family was $46,782. Males had a median income of $32,118 versus $26,926 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,079. About 8.20% of families and 10.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.20% of those under age 18 and 8.90% of those age 65 or over.

Crime

Clayton County has recently experienced a rise in crime, ranging from shootings to gang-related activity. Crime in the area might be attributed to the increase in population in the county and the large amount of affordable housing that attracts low-income families. In November 2006, the county appointed its first black police chief, Jeffrey E. Turner, who has promised to help alleviate crime in the county.

Cities and towns

Unincorporated areas

  • Lake Spivey
  • Clayton Panhandle
  • Old Dixie
  • Mountain View
  • Flintwoods
  • Flint River District
  • Lake Harber
  • Old Southe
  • Botany Woods
  • Valley Hill/North Jonesboro

Transportation

Air

Highways

Mass transit

Bus

Clayton County mass transit is run by C-Tran, with fIve fixed bus routes and Paratransit
  • 500 - Airport Loop
    501 - S.R. 54/Forest Park/Southlake Mall/Tara Blvd./Justice Center
    502 - Southlake Pkwy./Jonesboro/Lake City/Courthouse
    503 - Gardenwalk/Southern Regional Medical Center/Morrow/Mt. Zion Pkwy.
    504 - Riverdale Rd./Riverdale/S.R. 85/Flint River Rd./Justice Center
    503 - ShortTurn Southern Regional Hospital

Rail

There is commuter rail service in the planning stages along the Norfolk Southern line with proposed stations in Forest Park, Morrow, Jonesboro, and Lovejoy. This line is projected to run to Macon as soon as the line is completed.
MARTA's Airport Station is located in Clayton County.

Education

Primary and secondary schools

The Clayton County School System is the 5th largest in Georgia according to statistics on the school system's web site [2].

Higher education

Clayton State University in Morrow is the only four year institution in the county.

Coordinates: 33°32′N 84°22′W / 33.54, -84.36

This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Clayton County, Georgia. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Facts about Clayton County, GeorgiaRDF feed
County of country United States  +
County of subdivision1 Georgia (U.S. state)  +
Short name Clayton County  +

This article uses material from the "Clayton County, Georgia" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

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