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Unofficial emblem of Turkey
TurkishEmblem.svg
Versions
Emblem of the Republic of Turkey.svg
Oval escutcheon used by the Turkish Embassies and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Turkey circular emblem.jpg
Circular flag used on the old (non-digital) Turkish identity cards. It is also used in the emblems of a number of Turkish ministries and government organizations, in the emblem of the Turkish Parliament, and as the flag badge on the uniforms of Turkish national sports teams.
Details
Use Used on Turkish passports, visas[1] and ID cards[2]

Turkey does not have an official coat of arms or national emblem. The symbol on the cover page of Turkish passports is simply the star and crescent as found in the flag of Turkey.

The Turkish Ministry of Foreign Affairs uses a red oval-shaped escutcheon, whose colour is that of the Turkish flag and whose shape echoes the oval shield at the center of the late 19th-century Ottoman coat of arms.[3] The escutcheon contains a gold-tone star and crescent which are vertically oriented (with the star on top) and surrounded by the gold-tone text T.C. Dışişleri Bakanlığı.[4] A variant of this oval escutcheon (containing the gold-tone text Türkiye Cumhuriyeti Büyükelçiliği) is used by the Turkish embassies.[5][6]

A circular Turkish flag is used in the current emblems of a number of Turkish ministries and government organizations, in the emblem of the Turkish Parliament, and as the flag badge on the uniforms of Turkish national sports teams and athletes. It was also used on the old (non-digital) Turkish identity cards.[7]

The seal of the President of Turkey has a large 16-pointed star in the center, which is surrounded by 16 five-pointed stars, symbolizing the 16 Turkish states in history.[8]

See also

References

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