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Cobb County, Georgia
Seal of Cobb County, Georgia
Map of Georgia highlighting Cobb County
Location in the state of Georgia
Map of the U.S. highlighting Georgia
Georgia's location in the U.S.
Seat Marietta
Largest city Marietta
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

345 sq mi (892 km²)
340 sq mi (881 km²)
4 sq mi (11 km²), 1.27%
PopulationEst.
 - (2009)
 - Density

701,325
1,952/sq mi (763/km²)
Founded 1832
Website www.cobbcounty.org

Cobb County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. Its county seat and largest city is Marietta,[1] which is located in the center of the county. The county was named for Thomas Willis Cobb, who in the early 19th century was a United States representative and senator from Georgia. Marietta was named for his wife, Mary Moore Cobb.[2]

Cobb, along with several other counties in the same bill, was created December 3, 1832, by the Georgia General Assembly from the huge Cherokee "county" territory — land northwest of the Chattahoochee River which the state confiscated from the Cherokee Nation and redistributed to settlers via lottery, following the passage of the federal Indian Removal Act.[3]

As of the 2000 census, the population is 607,751. The county's population has continued to grow. The 2009 estimate from the U.S. Census Bureau was 701,355 people.[4] The county is part of the original and core (five-county) Atlanta metropolitan area, which is included in the AtlantaSandy SpringsMarietta, Georgia metropolitan statistical area.

The U.S. Census Bureau ranks Cobb County as the most-educated in the State of Georgia and 15th among all counties in the United States.[5] It is consistently ranked among top 100 wealthiest counties in the United States.[6]

Contents

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 345 square miles (892 km²), of which, 340 square miles (881 km²) of it is land and 4 square miles (11 km²) of it (1.27%) is water.

The county is divided between two major basins. Most runoff flows into the Chattahoochee River (along the southeastern border), via Willeo Creek, Sope Creek, Rottenwood Creek, Nickajack Creek and Powers Creek. A ridge from Lost Mountain in the west, to Kennesaw Mountain in the north-central, to Sweat Mountain in the extreme northeast, divides the far north-northwest of the county into the Etowah River basin, which includes Lake Allatoona. The Noonday Creek flows northward.

There are several high points in Cobb County.

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Adjacent counties

Part of Cobb was given to create part of Milton in 1857.

Addressing

Despite the lack of a grid system of city blocks though the county, all street addresses have their numeric origin at the southwest corner of the town square in Marietta.

From here, the north/south boundary heads west on Georgia 120, which is Whitlock Avenue and Dallas Highway. All addresses actually on this road are considered "southwest", even on the north side of the street, To the east, it follows 120 (South Park Square, Roswell Street, and Roswell Road), then onto Lower Roswell Road, and finally skipping to Paper Mill Road across a roadless strip, and down a small section of Johnson Ferry Road to the river.

The east/west boundary follows Church Street and its extension north to Bell's Ferry Road, with all addresses on it being "northwest", even on the east side of the street. To the south, it follows an arbitrary path toward Mableton, usually running between roads instead of along them.

Because the USPS delivers mail from post offices in other counties in some places, it has assigned the names and ZIP codes of those cities to areas in Cobb. This creates a situation where an address can appear to be in Atlanta, but is actually northwest of Atlanta in southeast Cobb, for example. This is the case with 30339, which is "Atlanta" by default, while Vinings is listed as "not acceptable". This area includes the Cumberland/Galleria area.

ZIP codes

Marietta
  • central and south - 30060 (Marietta main on Lawrence Street)
  • southeast - 30067 (Windy Hill Road branch)
  • east-southeast - 30068 (Mount Bethel branch on Lower Roswell Road)
  • east - 30062 (Gresham Road branch)
  • northeast - 30066 (Sprayberry branch in Sandy Plains)
  • Dobbins Air Reserve Base - 30069 (Dobbins AFB is acceptable)
  • others - 30008, 30064, 30090
  • PO boxes (at above post offices) - 30006, 30007, 30061, 30065
Other
  • Kennesaw - 30144, 30152 (new), 30156 (PO box), 30160 (PO box at Cobb Place)
  • Acworth - 30101, 30102
  • Smyrna - 30080, 30082 (30081 for PO boxes)
  • Mableton - 30126
  • Austell - 30106, 30168
  • Powder Springs - 30127
Out-of-county
  • Vinings - all of 30339 ("Atlanta" by default)
  • Roswell - part of 30075
  • Woodstock - part of 30188

Other geocodes

Originally in area code 404, the county was moved into area code 770 in 1995, and overlaid by area code 678 in 1998. Prior to 1995, those with phones tied to the Woodstock exchange (prefixes 924, 926, 928, later 516 and 591) could also call the Canton exchange (479, later 445, then 704) as a local call. This became moot, along with other dual-zone exchanges in metro Atlanta, when the exurban exchanges (including Canton) were fully made a part of what was already the world's largest toll-free calling zone.

The county's FIPS code is 13067. Because the National Weather Service has not subdivided the county, its WRSAME code is 013067, for receiving targeted weather warnings from NOAA Weather Radio. The county is within the broadcast range of one weather radio station: KEC80, on 162.550 MHz, transmitted to all of metro Atlanta and broadcast from NWSFO Peachtree City.

Cobb is county 033 on driver's licenses.

History

In 1915, convicted murderer Leo Frank was kidnapped from his jail cell and brought to Frey's Gin, two miles (3 km) east of Marietta. There he was lynched. The case was widely perceived as a miscarriage of justice.

When home rule was enacted statewide by amendment to the Georgia state constitution in the early 1960s, Ernest W. Barrett became the first chairman of the new county commission. The county courthouse, built in 1888, was demolished.

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1900 24,664
1910 28,397 15.1%
1920 30,437 7.2%
1930 35,408 16.3%
1940 38,272 8.1%
1950 61,830 61.6%
1960 114,174 84.7%
1970 196,793 72.4%
1980 297,718 51.3%
1990 447,745 50.4%
2000 607,751 35.7%

As of 2006, there were 679,325 people, 248,303 households, and 169,178 families residing in the county. The population density was 1,998 people per square mile (763/km²). There were 261,659 housing units at an average density of 770 per square mile (301/km²). The racial makeup of the county in 2006 was 56.0% White, 29.6% Black, 0.5% Native American, 4.1% Asian, 0.0% Pacific Islander, 8.8% from other races, and 1.4% from two or more races. 11.1% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 248,303 households out of which 35.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.30% were married couples living together, 10.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.20% were non-families. 23.20% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.25.

In the county the population was spread out with 26.10% under the age of 18, 9.00% from 18 to 24, 36.50% from 25 to 44, 21.50% from 45 to 64, and 6.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 98.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.90 males.

As of 2007, the mean income for a household in the county was $85,751, and the mean income for a family was $101,065. Males had a median income of $51,745 versus $42,509 for females. The per capita income for the county was $32,740. About 6.0% of families and 9.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.1% of those under age 18 and 7.8% of those age 65 or over.

Government and elections

Under Georgia's home rule provision, county governments have free rein to legislate on all matters within the county, provided that such legislation does not conflict with state or federal laws or constitutions.

Cobb County is governed by a five-member board of commissioners, which has both legislative and executive authority within the county. The chairman of the board is elected county-wide. The other four commissioners are elected from single-member districts. The board hires a county manager who oversees day-to-day operations of the county's executive departments.

County residents also elect a sheriff, district attorney, probate court judge, clerk of superior court, clerk of the state court, state court solicitor, chief magistrate judge (who then appoints other magistrate court judges), superior court judges, state court judges, tax commissioner, surveyor, and a seven-member board of education. The following is a table of those currently holding office as of September 2007:

Office Holder Office Holder
Sheriff Neil Warren State Court Solicitor Barry E. Morgan
District Attorney Pat Head Chief Magistrate Judge Frank Cox
Probate Court Judge David Dodd Tax Commissioner Gail Downing
Clerk of the Superior Court Jay Stephenson Clerk of the State Court Diane Webb

In addition to the county sheriff, the constitutional chief law enforcement officer of the county, Cobb County has a separate police department under the authority of the Board of Commissioners. The current Police Chief is G.B. Hatfield. The sheriff oversees the jail, to which everyone arrested under state law is taken, regardless of the city or other area of the county where it happens, or what police department makes the arrest.

Each city has a police department, but only Marietta, Smyrna, and Austell have their own fire departments, with the Cobb County Fire Department being the authority having jurisdiction over Kennesaw, Acworth, Powder Springs, and unincorporated areas. Cobb 911 covers unincorporated areas and the cities of Marietta and Powder Springs. Kennesaw and Acworth jointly operate a small 911 call center (PSAP) upstairs in Kennesaw city hall, dispatching the police departments in both cities, and forwarding fire calls to Cobb. Austell and Smyrna operate their own separate 911 systems.

Taxes

In addition to the 4% statewide sales tax, Cobb County levies an additional 2% for special projects, each 1% subject to separate renewal every few years by countywide referendum (including within its cities). This funds mainly transportation and parks. Cobb levies a 1% tax to lower property taxes, but only for the public school budget, and not the additional 1% HOST homestead exemption for general funds. It has also voted not to pay the extra 1% to join MARTA.

At the beginning of 2006 it became the last county in the state to raise the tax to 6%, which also doubled the tax on food to 2%. The SPLOST barely passed by a 114 vote margin, or less than one-quarter of a percent, in a September 2005 referendum. The revenue will go to a new county courthouse, expanded jail, various transportation projects, and the purchasing of property for parks and green space.[7] In 2008, the school tax was renewed for a third term, funding the Marietta and Cobb school systems.

Communities

Cities

Census-designated places

Unincorporated areas

Formerly incorporated:

Modern communities:

East Cobb, although often closer to Roswell, is mostly considered part of unincorporated Marietta by the U.S. Postal Service. Far southeastern Cobb (mainly Vinings and the Cumberland/Galleria area) is considered unincorporated Atlanta, even though it has its own ZIP code.

Formerly part of Cobb

Existing communities:

  • East Cobb - (E)
  • Sandy Plains - (NE)
  • Blackwells - (N)
  • Clarkdale - (S)
  • Noonday - (N)
  • Mount Bethel - (E)
  • Powers Park - (SE)
  • Due West - (W)
  • Lost Mountain - (W)
  • Mars Hill - (WNW)
  • Macland - (WSW)
  • Westoak - (NE)

Economy

The Cobb County School District is Cobb County's largest employer, employing over 15,000 people.[8] Private corporations include:

Diplomatic missions

The Consulate-General of Costa Rica in Atlanta is located in Suite 100 at 1870 The Exchange in an unincorporated section of Cobb County.[12]

Transportation

Major highways

Airports

Rail

Recreation

Venues

Education

Colleges and universities

Schools

Public schools

Private schools

Public libraries

Sister cities

References

External links

Coordinates: 33°56′N 84°35′W / 33.94°N 84.58°W / 33.94; -84.58


Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

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Cobb County, Georgia
File:Cobb County ga seal.gif
Map
File:Map of Georgia highlighting Cobb County.png
Location in the state of Georgia
Map of the USA highlighting Georgia
Georgia's location in the USA
Statistics
Founded 1832
Seat Marietta
Largest City Marietta
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

 sq mikm²)
 sq mi ( km²)
 sq mi ( km²), 1.27%
wikipedia:Population
 - (2006)
 - Density

679325
Website: www.cobbcounty.org

Cobb County is a county located in the U.S. state of Georgia. It was created December 3, 1832. As of the 2000 census, the population is 607,751. The county's population continues to grow. The 2006 estimate from the U.S. Census Bureau put the population at 679,325. Its county seat is Marietta6, located in the center of the county.

The county was named for Judge Thomas Willis Cobb, who in the early 19th century was a United States Representative and Senator from Georgia. He also served as a judge of the Superior Court of Georgia.

The county is part of the core Atlanta metropolitan area, which is included in the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Contents

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 892 km² (345 sq mi). 881 km² (340 sq mi) of it is land and 11 km² (4 sq mi) of it (1.27%) is water.

The county is divided between two major watersheds. Most runoff flows into the Chattahoochee River (along the southeastern border), via Willeo Creek, Sope Creek, Rottenwood Creek, Nickajack Creek, and Sweetwater Creek. A ridge from Lost Mountain in the west, to Kennesaw Mountain in the north, to Sweat Mountain in the extreme northeast, divides the far north-northwest of the county into the Lake Allatoona area, including the northward-flowing Noonday Creek.

There are several high points in Cobb.

Sweat Mountain: in the extreme northeast portion, runs along the border with Cherokee County

Blackjack Mountain: a low ridge in central Cobb

Kennesaw Mountain: The highest point in Cobb County located in the western reaches of the county.

Little Kennesaw Mountain: An offshoot of Kennesaw

Major highways

Adjacent counties

Addressing

Despite the lack of a grid system of city blocks though the county, all street addresses have their numeric origin at the southwest corner of the town square in Marietta.

From here, the north/south boundary heads west on Georgia 120, which is Whitlock Avenue and Dallas Highway. All addresses actually on this road are considered "southwest", even on the north side of the street, To the east, it follows 120 (South Park Square, Roswell Street, and Roswell Road), then onto Lower Roswell Road, and finally skipping to Paper Mill Road across a roadless strip, and down a small section of Johnson Ferry Road to the river.

The east/west boundary follows Church Street and its extension north to Bell's Ferry Road, with all addresses on it being "northwest", even on the east side of the street. To the south, it follows an arbitrary path toward Mableton, usually running between roads instead of along them.

Because the USPS delivers mail from post offices in other counties in some places, it has assigned the names and ZIP codes of those cities to areas in Cobb. This creates a situation where an address can appear to be in southeast Atlanta, but is actually northwest of Atlanta in southeast Cobb, for example.

Demographics

As of 2005, there were 663,818 people (2005), 241,847 households (2004), and 170,167 families (2004) residing in the county. The population density was 763/km² (1,952/sq mi). There were 261,659 housing units at an average density of 301/km² (770/sq mi). The racial makeup of the county in 2005 was 64.3% White, 21.2% Black, 0.5% Native American, 3.8% Asian, 0.0% Pacific Islander, 8.8% from other races, and 1.4% from two or more races. 10.0% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 241,847 (2004) households out of which 35.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.30% were married couples living together, 10.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.20% were non-families. 23.20% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.14.

In the county the population was spread out with 26.10% under the age of 18, 9.00% from 18 to 24, 36.50% from 25 to 44, 21.50% from 45 to 64, and 6.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 98.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.90 males.

As of 2003, the median income for a household in the county was $60,565, and the median income for a family was $72,398. Males had a median income of $50,460 versus $38,555 for females. The per capita income for the county was $30,620. About 6.3% of families and 8.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.10% of those under age 18 and 6.80% of those age 65 or over.

Government and elections

File:CobbCountyCourthouse.jpg Under Georgia's home rule provision, county governments have free rein to legislate on all matters within the county, provided that such legislation does not conflict with state or federal laws or constitutions. When this home rule was enacted for Cobb by the Georgia General Assembly in the early 1960s, Ernest W. Barrett became the first chairman of the new county commission.

Cobb County is currently governed by a five-member Board of Commissioners, which has both legislative and executive authority within the county. The chairman of the Board is elected county-wide. The other four commissioners are elected from single-member districts; though during 2004, the commission has discussed adding at least one member, to keep up with the county's growing population. The Board hires a county manager who oversees day-to-day operations of the county's executive departments.

County residents also elect a sheriff, district attorney, probate court judge, clerk of superior court, state court solicitor, chief magistrate judge (who then appoints other magistrate court judges), superior court judges, state court judges, tax commissioner, surveyor, and a seven-member board of education. The following is a table of those currently holding office as of September 2007:

Office Holder Office Holder
Sheriff Neil Warren State Court Solicitor Barry E. Morgan
District Attorney Pat Head Chief Magistrate Judge Frank Cox
Probate Court Judge David Dodd Tax Commissioner Gail Downing
Clerk of the Superior Court Jay Stephenson


In addition to the county sheriff, the constitutional chief law enforcement officer of the county, Cobb County has a separate police department under the authority of the Board of Commissioners. The sheriff oversees the jail, to which everyone arrested under state law is taken, regardless of the city or other area of the county where it happens, or what police department makes the arrest.

Taxes

In addition to the 4% statewide sales tax, Cobb County levies an additional 2% for special projects, each 1% subject to separate renewal every few years by countywide referendum (including within its cities). This funds mainly transportation and parks. Cobb levies a 1% tax to lower property taxes, but only for the public school budget, and not the additional 1% HOST homestead exemption for general funds. It has also voted not to pay the extra 1% to join MARTA, which has made operating and expanding that rapid transit system difficult even in the two counties where it does operate.

At the beginning of 2006 it became the last county in the state to raise the tax to 6%, which also doubled the tax on food to 2%. The SPLOST barely passed by a 114 vote margin, or less than one-quarter of a percent, in a September 2005 referendum. The revenue will go to a new county courthouse and expanded jail, and toward various road projects [1]

Cities and communities

Unincorporated:

Formerly incorporated:

Existing communities:

  • East Cobb - (E)
  • Sandy Plains - (NE)
  • Blackwell - (N)
  • Clarkdale - (S)
  • Noonday - (N)
  • Mt. Bethel - (NE)
  • Powers Park - (SE)
  • Due West - (W)
  • Lost Mountain - (W)
  • Mars Hill - (WNW)
  • Macland - (WSW)
  • Westoak - (NE)

Modern communities:

Part of northeastern Cobb is considered unincorporated Roswell and unincorporated Sandy Springs; and part of southeastern Cobb (mainly Vinings) is considered unincorporated Atlanta. All three cities are in neighboring Fulton County. Portions of far northeastern Cobb are considered to be unincorporated Woodstock, which is actually in Cherokee County. Those areas carry a Woodstock zip code.

Major businesses

Transportation

Recreation

Education

Colleges and universities

Schools

Public schools

Private schools

Public libraries

See also: Cobb County Public Library System (CCPLS)

External links

Coordinates: 33°56′N 84°35′W / 33.94, -84.58


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at Cobb County, Georgia. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Facts about Cobb County, GeorgiaRDF feed
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County of subdivision1 Georgia (U.S. state)  +
Short name Cobb County  +

This article uses material from the "Cobb County, Georgia" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

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