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Colorado's 5th congressional district
US-Congressional-District-CO-5.PNG
Current Representative Doug Lamborn (R)
Area 7,732 mi²
Distribution 85.7% urban, 14.3% rural
Population (2000) 614,467
Median income $45,454
Ethnicity 77.4% White, 5.7% Black, 2.2% Asian, 11.1% Hispanic, 0.7% Native American, 0.2% other
Cook PVI R+14

Colorado's 5th congressional district was created after the 1970 census. The district lies in the center of the state and mostly comprises Colorado Springs and its suburbs. Currently, it is represented by Republican Doug Lamborn, who has represented the district since 2006. The Republican Party has held control of the seat since the district's creation.

District characteristics

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Politics

With a Cook PVI of R+16, the 5th congressional district of Colorado is arguably the most conservative district within the state. Colorado Springs, the main population center within the district, is home to many conservative-leaning organizations. Among these groups are Focus on the Family, its founder Dr. James Dobson (who is considered by some to be the most influential evangelical leader in the country[1]), New Life Church, Compassion International, HCJB, and many others. Colorado Springs also boasts a large population of both active-duty and retired military personnel, and is home to many companies in the defense industry, all of which are demographics that tend to vote for Republicans.

The 5th congressional district does have a few liberal-leaning regions, however. Manitou Springs is home to Democrat Michael Merrifield, who represents Colorado House District 18. In 2008, Democrat Dennis Apuan was elected to represent Colorado House District 17, a seat previously held by a Republican.

Throughout the district's history, Republicans have won by comfortable margins. From 1996 through 2004, Republican Joel Hefley usually won about 70% of the vote, while his Democratic challenger walked away with less than 30%. In 2006 and 2008, however, Republican Doug Lamborn received about 60% of the vote, while his Democratic challengers won about 40%. The reason for Democrats receiving larger percentages in the district isn't known, but there are three likely causes. One possible cause could be that the demographics within the district are shifting. Another possible cause could be just general dissatisfaction with Lamborn in comparison to Hefley. Finally, 2006 and 2008 were difficult election years for Republicans overall.

Economy

Because of the strong military presence, Colorado Springs' economy is usually very stable and frequently sees growth. The western portions of the district are mostly small mountain towns whose economy depends on ranching, farming, mining, and tourism.

Tourism

Millions of tourists visit the Colorado Springs region every year, primarily to visit Garden of the Gods, Pikes Peak, and the United States Air Force Academy.

Military

Colorado Springs, located within the district, is home to multiple military installations. Fort Carson, the United States Air Force Academy, Peterson Air Force Base, Schriever Air Force Base, and NORAD all call the area home.

History of district boundaries

1990s alignment

Following the 1990 U.S. census and associated realignment of Colorado congressional districts, the 5th Congressional district consisted of El Paso and Teller counties, as well as portions of Arapahoe, Douglas, and Fremont counties. [2]

2000s alignment

Following the 2000 U.S. census and associated realignment of Colorado congressional districts, the 5th Congressional district consisted of Chaffee, El Paso, Fremont, Lake, and Teller counties, as well as portions of Park County. George W. Bush received 66% of the vote in this district in 2004.

List of representatives

Representative Party Years District home Note
District created following the 1970 census
Bill Armstrong Republican January 3, 1973 – January 3, 1979 Littleton[3] Sought and won election for U.S. Senator
Ken Kramer Republican January 3, 1979 – January 3, 1987 Sought and lost election for U.S. Senator
Joel Hefley Republican January 3, 1987 – January 3, 2007 Colorado Springs Retired
Doug Lamborn Republican January 3, 2007 – Present Colorado Springs Incumbent

Election results

Below is a history of election results for United States Representative for the 5th congressional district of Colorado. If an individual is listed for a general election, but not in that year's primary election, it is because they were nominated without an official ballot count. Candidates listed as not having a party are write-in candidates.

1972197419761978198019821984198619881990199219941996199820002002200420062008

1996

United States House of Representatives elections, 1996 - Primary[4]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Republican Joel Hefley 36,994 76.70%
Republican Bill Hughes 11,236 23.30%
Totals 48,230 100%
Democratic Mike Robinson ' 100%
Totals ' 100%
United States House of Representatives elections, 1996 - General[5]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Republican Joel Hefley 188,805 71.9%
Democratic Mike Robinson 73,660 28.1%
Totals 262,465 100%
Voter turnout  %
Republican hold

1998

United States House of Representatives elections, 1998 - Primary
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Republican Joel Hefley ' 100%
Totals ' 100%
Democratic Ken Alford ' 100%
Totals ' 100%
Natural Law Mark A. Melot ' 100%
Totals ' 100%
United States House of Representatives elections, 1998 - General[6]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Republican Joel Hefley 155,790 72.71%
Democratic Ken Alford 55,609 25.95%
Natural Law Mark A. Mellot 2,871 1.34%
Totals 214,270 100%
Voter turnout  %
Republican hold

2000

United States House of Representatives elections, 2000 - Primary
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Republican Joel Hefley ' 100%
Totals ' 100%
Libertarian Kerry Kantor ' 100%
Totals ' 100%
Natural Law Randy MacKenzie ' 100%
Totals ' 100%
United States House of Representatives elections, 2000 - General[7]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Republican Joel Hefley 253,330 82.70%
Libertarian Kerry Kantor 37,719 12.31%
Natural Law Randy MacKenzie 15,260 4.98%
Totals 306,309 100%
Voter turnout  %
Republican hold

2002

United States House of Representatives elections, 2002 - Primary
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Republican Joel Hefley ' 100%
Totals ' 100%
Democratic Curtis Imrie ' 100%
Totals ' 100%
Libertarian Biff Baker ' 100%
Totals ' 100%
United States House of Representatives elections, 2002 - General[8]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Republican Joel Hefley 128,118 69.39%
Democratic Curtis Imrie 45,587 24.69%
Libertarian Biff Baker 10,927 5.92%
Totals 184,632 100%
Voter turnout  %
Republican hold

2004

United States House of Representatives elections, 2004 - Primary[9 ]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Republican Joel Hefley 52,282 84.23%
Republican Mike Payton 9,785 15.77%
Totals 62,067 100%
Democratic Fred Hardee ' 100%
Libertarian Arthur Roberts ' 100%
Totals ' 100%
United States House of Representatives elections, 2004 - General[9 ]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Republican Joel Hefley 193,352 70.54%
Democratic Fred Hardee 74,117 27.04%
Libertarian Arthur Roberts 6,631 2.42%
Totals 274,100 100%
Voter turnout  %
Republican hold

2006

United States House of Representatives elections, 2006 - Primary[10]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Republican Doug Lamborn 15,126 26.97%
Republican Jeff Crank 14,234 25.38%
Republican Bentley B. Rayburn 9,735 17.36%
Republican Lionel Rivera 7,213 12.86%
Republican John Wesley Anderson 6,474 11.54%
Republican Duncan Bremer 3,310 5.90%
Totals 56,092 100%
Democratic Jay Fawcett ' 100%
Totals ' 100%
United States House of Representatives elections, 2006 - General[11]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Republican Doug Lamborn 123,264 59.62%
Democratic Jay Fawcett 83,431 40.35%
No party Richard D. Hand 41 0.02%
No party Brian X. Scott 12 0.01%
No party Gregory S. Hollister 8 0.00%
Totals 206,756 100%
Voter turnout  %
Republican hold

2008

United States House of Representatives elections, 2008 - Primary[12]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Republican Doug Lamborn 24,995 44.02%
Republican Jeff Crank 16,794 29.58%
Republican Bentley B. Rayburn 14,986 26.40%
Totals 56,775 100%
Democratic Hal Bidlack 13,146 100%
Totals 13,146 100%
United States House of Representatives elections, 2008 - General[13]
Party Candidate Votes Percentage
Republican Doug Lamborn 183,178 60.03%
Democratic Hal Bidlack 113,025 37.04%
Constitution Brian X. Scott 8,894 2.91%
No party Richard D. Hand 45 0.01%
Voter turnout  %
Republican hold

References

  1. ^ Olsen, Ted (2005-02-21). "Who's Driving This Thing?". Christianity Today. http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2005/februaryweb-only/12.0c.html. Retrieved 2008-09-05.  
  2. ^ State of Colorado. Congressional District Map [map]. Retrieved on 2008-12-22.
  3. ^ "ARMSTRONG, William Lester". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774-Present. http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=A000219. Retrieved 22 December 2008.  
  4. ^ "Statewide and Congressional Districts Results - 1996". Colorado Secretary of State. http://www.elections.colorado.gov/DDefault.aspx?tid=477&vmid=106. Retrieved 22 December 2008.  
  5. ^ "Representative - US Congress Results - 1996". Colorado Secretary of State. http://www.elections.colorado.gov/DDefault.aspx?tid=478&vmid=109. Retrieved 22 December 2008.  
  6. ^ "Representative to 106th United States Congress Results - 1998". Colorado Secretary of State. http://www.elections.colorado.gov/DDefault.aspx?tid=465&vmid=78. Retrieved 22 December 2008.  
  7. ^ "2000 General Election Results - Final Certified Official". Colorado Secretary of State. http://www.elections.colorado.gov/DDefault.aspx?tid=459. Retrieved 22 December 2008.  
  8. ^ "Official Publication of the Abstract of Votes Cast for the 2001 Coordinated, 2002 Primary, 2002 General". Colorado Secretary of State. http://www.elections.colorado.gov/WWW/default/Prior%20Years%20Election%20Information/2002/2002_abstract.pdf. Retrieved 22 December 2008.  
  9. ^ a b "Official Publication of the Abstract of Votes Cast for the 2003 Coordinated, 2004 Primary, 2004 General". Colorado Secretary of State. http://www.elections.colorado.gov/WWW/default/Prior%20Years%20Election%20Information/2004/Abstract%202003%202004%20082305%20Late%20PM-5.pdf. Retrieved 22 December 2008.  
  10. ^ "Colorado Cumulative Report - Official Results - Primary Election". Colorado Secretary of State. http://www.sos.state.co.us/pubs/electionresults2006P/. Retrieved 22 December 2008.  
  11. ^ "Colorado Cumulative Report - General Election". Colorado Secretary of State. http://www.sos.state.co.us/pubs/electionresults2006G/. Retrieved 22 December 2008.  
  12. ^ "Colorado Cumulative Report - Primary Election". Colorado Secretary of State. http://rs.ezvotetally.com/. Retrieved 22 December 2008.  
  13. ^ "Canvass Report (Cumulative)". Colorado Secretary of State. 11 December 2008. http://coreports.ezvotetally.com/CanvassReportCumulative/tabid/59/Default.aspx. Retrieved 22 December 2008.  


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