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U.S. Army Command & General Staff College
LeavenworthCrest.jpg
USAC&GS Coat of Arms
Active 1881-Present
Country USA
Allegiance Federal
Garrison/HQ Fort Leavenworth, Kansas
Commanders
Current
commander
Robert L. Caslen (nominated)

The U.S. Army Command and General Staff College (USAC&GSC) at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas is a United States Army facility that functions as a graduate school for United States Armed Forces and foreign military leaders. It was originally established in 1881 as a school for infantry and cavalry by William Tecumseh Sherman.[1]

The development of the college has proceeded parallel with the increasing professionalization of the U.S. Army, reaching its present form in the aftermath of the Vietnam War.

Contents

Mission Statement

The U.S. Army Command and General Staff College educates and develops leaders for full spectrum joint, interagency and multinational operations; acts as lead agent for the Army’s leader development program; and advances the art and science of the profession of arms in support of Army operational requirements.[2]

Schools

The college consists of five schools:[3]

  • Command and General Staff School (CGSS) - a 10-month course for intermediate level U.S. Army and sister service Officers, and allied officers to be field grade commanders and staff officers.[4] Almost all army officers who attain the rank of Major (United States) attend the school (although a few attend branch campuses at maintained by the college at Fort Belvoir; Fort Lee, Virginia and Fort Gordon). The program is the Intermediate Level Education (ILE).[5] Officers who attain the rank of lieutenant colonel or Colonel (United States) are trained at the United States Army War College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania.[6] The 2009 class was the biggest with 960 students, including four warrant officers (the first time at the school),[7] 65 international students, and 6 interagency (non-military) students.
  • Department of Distance Education (DDE) - Handles the distance education for U.S. and allied officers.[8] The program teaches about 8,000 ILE students each year, primarily National Guard and Reserve.
  • School of Advanced Military Studies (SAMS) - Awards a Masters Degree in Military Arts and Sciences (MMAS) on studies of strategically and operationally complex issues.[9]
  • School for Command Preparation (SCP) - Offers four week courses for Colonels, Lieutenant Colonels, Command Sergeants Major and their spouses selected for Battalion and Brigade levels of command.[10][11]
  • Army Management Staff College (AMSC) - trains civilians and military for support positions. It provides consulting services and conducts research.[12]

Notable people

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Notable alumni

See also:Category:United States Army Command and General Staff College alumni

Notable foreign alumni

The college reports that 7,000 international students representing 155 countries have attended CGSC since 1894 and that more than 50 percent of CGSC International Military Student (IMS) graduates attain the rank of general.[13]

Notable faculty and deputy commandants

Commandants

Since 1976 commandant of the college has been a Lieutenant General (three stars). David Petraeus was the previous commandant immediately before going to command the Multinational Force - Iraq.

Photo Gallery

See also

References

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ "CGSC - Command and General Staff College". Usacac.army.mil. 2008-10-28. http://usacac.army.mil/cac2/cgsc/about.asp. Retrieved 2010-03-16. 
  3. ^ About the Command and General Staff School - army.mil - Retrieved October 10, 2009
  4. ^ "CGSC - Command and General Staff School". Usacac.army.mil. http://usacac.army.mil/cac2/cgsc/cgss/index.asp. Retrieved 2010-03-16. 
  5. ^ "College - Command and General Staff College Foundation". Cgscfoundation.org. http://www.cgscfoundation.org/college.php. Retrieved 2010-03-16. 
  6. ^ "US Army War College". Carlisle.army.mil. http://www.carlisle.army.mil/USAWC/Registar/policies.cfm. Retrieved 2010-03-16. 
  7. ^ "Largest CGSC-ILE class graduates". Army.mil. http://www.army.mil/-news/2009/06/18/22946-largest-cgsc-ileclass-graduates/. Retrieved 2010-03-16. 
  8. ^ "Cgsc - Dde". Usacac.army.mil. 2008-10-28. http://usacac.army.mil/cac2/cgsc/dde/index.asp. Retrieved 2010-03-16. 
  9. ^ "Cgsc - Sams". Usacac.army.mil. 2010-02-19. http://usacac.army.mil/cac2/cgsc/sams/index.asp. Retrieved 2010-03-16. 
  10. ^ "Cgsc - Scp". Usacac.army.mil. 2009-07-27. http://usacac.army.mil/cac2/cgsc/scp/index.asp. Retrieved 2010-03-16. 
  11. ^ "College - Command and General Staff College Foundation". Cgscfoundation.org. http://www.cgscfoundation.org/college.php. Retrieved 2010-03-16. 
  12. ^ "Army Management Staff College". Amsc.belvoir.army.mil. http://www.amsc.belvoir.army.mil/. Retrieved 2010-03-16. 
  13. ^ International Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony - usacac.army.mil October 1, 2009
  14. ^ Halloran, Richard (1988-12-14). "Washington Talk - Briefing - A Hero Retires". NYTimes.com. http://www.nytimes.com/1988/12/14/us/washington-talk-briefing-a-hero-retires.html. Retrieved 2010-03-16. 

External links


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