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In broadcasting, a commercial bumper, ident bumper or break bumper (often shortened to bump) is a brief announcement, usually two to 15 seconds, placed between a pause in the program and its commercial break, and vice versa. The host, the program announcer, or a continuity announcer states the title (if any) of the presentation, the name of the program, and the broadcast or cable network, though not necessarily in that order. Bumper music, often a recurring signature or theme music segment, is nearly always featured. Bumpers can vary from simple text to short films.

Contents

U.S. usage

Most network television shows in the United States (since 1976) no longer use commercial bumpers, but some soap operas such as As The World Turns and The Young and The Restless still use mid-show bumpers. Commercial bumpers are still a common feature of radio. In radio, they are often used during sports broadcasts to ease the transition from play by play to commercial break, and to return to live action, many times using obscure musical selections of the board operator's choosing. One notable example of commercial bumpers still in use can be found on Cartoon Network's late night programming block, Adult Swim, whose extensive bump usage has even spawned its own website.[1] Another example of commercial bumpers in radio was their use in syndicated programming; for instance, the radio countdown programs "American Top 40" and "American Country Countdown" feature a series of pre-recorded jingles and other outcues to transition to and from commercial breaks.

In the late 1970s and early 1980s, in accordance with then-current FCC regulations that required distinction between programs and commercials, most children's programming bumpers would include the phrase "We'll be [right] back after these messages," except for the bump before the final commercial break, which would usually say, "And now, these messages." In 1984, the FCC significantly relaxed these rules.[2]

UK usage

In the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, a break-bumper is a brief appearance of a logo before or after advertising breaks, usually that of the television channel being watched.

Break-bumpers can either be animated or static, and rarely appear for more than two seconds. They are sometimes branded to advertise a special programme or event that will be broadcast on that channel, for example sports matches.

Japan usage

Eyecatch are bumpers used in Japanese anime.

Usage in Malaysia

In the 1990s, commercial bumpers are used by terrestrial television networks. Similar to those in the UK, it is a short appearance of a logo or the programme slide shown before or after breaks. The logo is usually that of the television channel or station being watched and/or of the program title. However, as the years passed on until the late 2000s, it is replaced by putting a message that the programme will be back after the break which is now more commonly seen, but the 1990s bumper style is sometimes used sparingly.

Since 2003, nearly of Astro's own satellite television channels feature break bumpers that are placed before and after breaks. These bumpers consist of the logo of the aforementioned channels, as well as the now and next slide promoting the current programme being watched and the next one. Also, a bumper, based on the subscription information sequence at the ending of the Astro Box Office promotional trailers from 2003 to 2006, appears in-between commercials and immediately before rejoining back, but not at the beginning of the block of replaced commercials.

Notes

  1. ^ bumpworthy.com
  2. ^ Singer, Jerome L. Handbook of Children and the Media (Sage, 2002). 385-386. ISBN 9780761919551.
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In broadcasting, a commercial bumper, ident bumper or break bumper (often shortened to bump) is a brief announcement, usually two to 15 seconds, placed between a pause in the program and its commercial break (and also the other way around). The host, the program announcer, or a continuity announcer states the title (if any) of the presentation, the name of the program, and the broadcast or cable network, though not necessarily in that order. Bumper music, often a recurring signature or theme music segment, is nearly always featured. Bumpers can vary from simple text to short films.

Contents

US usage

Most network television shows in the U.S. (since 1976) no longer use commercial bumpers, but they are a common feature of radio. In radio, they are often used during sports broadcasts to ease the transition from play by play to commercial break, and to return to live action, many times using obscure musical selections of the board operator's choosing. One notable example of commercial bumpers still in use can be found on Cartoon Network's late night programming block, Adult Swim, whose extensive bump usage has even spawned it's own website.[1] Another example of commercial bumpers in radio was their use in syndicated programming; for instance, the radio countdown programs "American Top 40" and "American Country Countdown" feature a series of pre-recorded jingles and other outcues to transition to and from commercial breaks.

In the late 1970s and early 1980s, in accordance with then-current FCC regulations that required distinction between programs and commercials, most children's programming bumpers would include the phrase "We'll be [right] back after these messages," except for the bump before the final commercial break, which would usually say, "And now, these messages." In 1984, the FCC significantly relaxed these rules.[2]

UK usage

In the United Kingdom, a break-bumper is a brief appearance of a logo before, after or in-between commercial breaks. The logo is almost always that of the television channel being watched and/or of the program title. Since the introduction of program sponsorship in the UK it has become common practice for channels to use brief sponsor's promotions in place of bumpers.

Break-bumpers can either be animated or static, and rarely appear for more than two seconds. They are sometimes branded to advertise a special programme or event that will be broadcast on that channel. Examples of this are sports matches, the BRIT Awards and Big Brother.

Japan usage

Eyecatch are bumpers used in Japanese anime.

Usage in Malaysia

During in the 1990s, commercial bumpers are used by terrestrial television networks. Similar to those in the UK, it is a short appearance of a logo before or after breaks. The logo is usually that of the television channel or station being watched and/or of the program title. However, as years pass on until the late 2000s, they are no longer being used, although they sometimes are used sparingly.

Since 2003, nearly of Astro's own satellite television channels feature break bumpers that are placed before and after breaks. These bumpers consist of the logo of the aforementioned channels, as well as the now and next slide promoting the current programme being watched and the next one. Also, a bumper, based on the subscription information sequence at the ending of the Astro Box Office promotional trailers from 2003 to 2006, appears in-between commercials and immediately before rejoining back, but not at the beginning of the block of replaced commercials.

Notes

  1. bumpworthy.com
  2. Singer, Jerome L. Handbook of Children and the Media (Sage, 2002). 385-386. ISBN 9780761919551.


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