Committee for a Workers' International: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Committee for a Workers' International (CWI) is an international association of Trotskyist parties. Members include the Socialist Party of England and Wales, the Socialist Party (Ireland), the Socialist Party (Australia) the Democratic Socialist Movement in South Africa and Nigeria and groups using the name Socialist Alternative in the United States and Canada, along with parties in Sweden and Germany. In all the CWI has affiliates or representatives in 40 countries worldwide.

Contents

History

Logo of CWI.

The CWI was founded in 1974 at a conference in London on 20/21 April[1] by supporters of what was then called the Militant tendency in Britain, Sweden, Ireland and several other countries (the conference was attended by 46 people from 12 countries[2]). At that time CWI sections generally pursued a policy of entryism into social democratic or labour parties, although it was not the only strategy pursued.

This strategy ended in the early 1990s. The CWI developed an analysis that these parties had changed in nature and had become simply capitalist parties. This was strongly resisted by Ted Grant, Militant's founder. After a lengthy debate [1] and special conference in 1991 confirmed overwhelmingly the position of the CWI in the England and Wales section, Grant and his supporters sought official faction status within the organization, which was granted for some time, but later was revoked by the leadership when Grant's followers refused to pay dues to the CWI and after documents leaked indicating that Grant's faction planned to engineer a split. The revocation of faction status thus expelled Ted Grant and his supporters, who later went on to form the International Marxist Tendency.

Grant dismissed the leadership of the CWI, especially Peter Taaffe, as sectarians because they had deserted, in his view, the mass parties of the working class. Grant cited the success of the Militant in Britain, which as entryists had secured Dave Nellist, Terry Fields and Pat Wall as MPs. However this was countered with the argument that the clear determination of the Labour leadership under Neil Kinnock to destroy Trotskyist influence in the party, as well as Labour's move away from socialist policies, had changed the situation in the party. However, out of nearly 8,000 members only 200 were successfully expelled from the Labour Party. It was no longer possible, the CWI argued, for Militant to carry out activity in the way it had been done up to the late 1980s. In the UK, Kinnock had Terry Fields removed as a Labour MP in 1991, and Dave Nellist was suspended from the party around the same time. (Pat Wall had died.) Since the abandonment of entryism the CWI's influence and membership has dwindled for a number of reasons though it remains significantly larger and more influential than Grant's group.

Activities

Since their Open Turn CWI sections have, in a number of countries, run candidates under their own name, electing Joe Higgins to the Irish parliament Dáil Éireann as a Socialist Party candidate (and after to the European Parliament[3]) as well as several councillors in Britain, specifically in London and Coventry and in the Republic of Ireland. The CWI also has elected members of regional legislatures or local councils in Sweden, Germany, Australia, the Netherlands (members of the Dutch Socialist Party), Pakistan, Sri Lanka and in the former Soviet Union. In the 2005 Sri Lankan presidential elections the CWI affiliate, the United Socialist Party, came third (with 0.4%) while gaining the highest left vote.[4]

Supporters of the CWI launched a youth organisation, International Socialist Resistance, in 2001. [5]

CWI members played a leading role in founding the Scottish Socialist Party. The CWI later left the SSP, establishing a new party in Scotland, Solidarity, in conjunction with the Socialist Workers Party.

CWI members stood as National Conscience Party candidates in the 2003 Nigerian legislative elections, gaining the best results that the NCP (reaching 0.51% on a national scale) achieved. In Germany CWI members have been active in the new WASG since its foundation in 2004 and in December 2005 were elected part of the new leadership of its Berlin district that ran candidates on a clear anti-cuts programme in the 2006 Berlin regional election, gaining 3.1% and several borough council seats, but the Berlin WASG fell apart soon after the elections. In Brazil CWI members helped found the P-SOL Socialism and Freedom Party after left wing parliamentarians were expelled from the PT.

List of CWI sections

The following are the sections claimed by the CWI.

External links

See also

References

  1. ^ Taaffe, P. (2004) A Socialist World is Possible London: CWI Publications and Socialist Books, pg.67
  2. ^ Taaffe, P. (2004) A Socialist World is Possible London: CWI Publications and Socialist Books, pg.52
  3. ^ 2009 European Election results - retrieved 11/24/09
  4. ^ United Socialist Party (cwi) comes third in presidential election - retrieved 17/08/07
  5. ^ 500+ at Brussels ISR conference - retrieved 17/03/08
Advertisements

The Committee for a Workers' International (CWI) is an international association of Trotskyist parties. Members include the Socialist Party of England and Wales, the Socialist Party (Ireland), the Socialist Party (Australia) the Democratic Socialist Movement in South Africa and Nigeria and groups using the name Socialist Alternative in the United States and Canada, along with parties in Sweden and Germany. In all the CWI has affiliates or representatives in 40 countries worldwide.

Contents

History

The CWI was founded in 1974 at a conference in London on 20/21 April[1] by supporters of what was then called the Militant tendency in Britain, Sweden, Ireland and several other countries (the conference was attended by 46 people from 12 countries[2]). At that time CWI sections generally pursued a policy of entryism into social democratic or labour parties, although it was not the only strategy pursued.

This strategy ended in the early 1990s. The CWI developed an analysis that these parties had changed in nature and had become simply capitalist parties. This was strongly resisted by Ted Grant, Militant's founder. After a lengthy debate [1] and special conference in 1991 confirmed overwhelmingly the position of the CWI in the England and Wales section, Grant and his supporters sought official faction status within the organization, which was granted for some time, but later was revoked by the leadership when Grant's followers refused to pay dues to the CWI and after documents leaked indicating that Grant's faction planned to engineer a split. The revocation of faction status thus expelled Ted Grant and his supporters, who later went on to form the International Marxist Tendency.

Grant dismissed the leadership of the CWI, especially Peter Taaffe, as sectarians because they had deserted, in his view, the mass parties of the working class. Grant cited the success of the Militant in Britain, which as entryists had secured Dave Nellist, Terry Fields and Pat Wall as MPs. However this was countered with the argument that the clear determination of the Labour leadership under Neil Kinnock to destroy Trotskyist influence in the party, as well as Labour's move away from socialist policies, had changed the situation in the party. However, out of nearly 8,000 members only 200 were successfully expelled from the Labour Party. It was no longer possible, the CWI argued, for Militant to carry out activity in the way it had been done up to the late 1980s. In the UK, Kinnock had Terry Fields removed as a Labour MP in 1991, and Dave Nellist was suspended from the party around the same time. (Pat Wall had died.) Since the abandonment of entryism the CWI's influence and membership has dwindled for a number of reasons though it remains significantly larger and more influential than Grant's group.

Activities

Since their Open Turn CWI sections have, in a number of countries, run candidates under their own name, electing Joe Higgins to the Irish parliament Dáil Éireann as a Socialist Party candidate (and after to the European Parliament[3]) as well as several councillors in Britain, specifically in London and Coventry, and in the Republic of Ireland. The CWI also has elected members of regional legislatures or local councils in Sweden, Germany, Australia, the Netherlands (members of the Dutch Socialist Party), Pakistan, Sri Lanka and in the former Soviet Union. In the 2005 Sri Lankan presidential elections the CWI affiliate, the United Socialist Party, came third (with 0.4%) while gaining the highest left vote.[4]

Supporters of the CWI launched a youth organisation, International Socialist Resistance, in 2001. [5]

CWI members played a leading role in founding the Scottish Socialist Party. The CWI later left the SSP, establishing a new party in Scotland, Solidarity, in conjunction with the Socialist Workers Party.

CWI members stood as National Conscience Party candidates in the 2003 Nigerian legislative elections, gaining the best results that the NCP (reaching 0.51% on a national scale) achieved. In Germany CWI members have been active in the new WASG since its foundation in 2004 and in December 2005 were elected part of the new leadership of its Berlin district that ran candidates on a clear anti-cuts programme in the 2006 Berlin regional election, gaining 3.1% and several borough council seats, but the Berlin WASG fell apart soon after the elections. In Brazil CWI members helped found the P-SOL Socialism and Freedom Party after left wing parliamentarians were expelled from the PT.

List of CWI sections

The following are the sections claimed by the CWI.

Criticism

Other Marxists and trotskyites have criticised the CWI for being too centred on the UK, having Peter Taaffe and Lynn Walsh (both British) as it main leaders and having a too narrow idea of what Marxism means in the late 20th and now 21st century. [6]

See also

References

  1. ^ Taaffe, P. (2004) A Socialist World is Possible London: CWI Publications and Socialist Books, pg.67
  2. ^ Taaffe, P. (2004) A Socialist World is Possible London: CWI Publications and Socialist Books, pg.52
  3. ^ 2009 European Election results - retrieved 11/24/09
  4. ^ United Socialist Party (cwi) comes third in presidential election - retrieved 17/08/07
  5. ^ 500+ at Brussels ISR conference - retrieved 17/03/08
  6. ^ http://links.org.au/node/149

External links


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message