Connecticut's 2nd congressional district: Wikis

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Connecticut's 2nd congressional district
United States House of Representatives, Connecticut District 2 map.png
Current Representative Joe Courtney (D)
Area 2,143 mi²
Distribution 66.7% urban, 33.3% rural
Population (2000) 681,113
Median income $54,498
Ethnicity 88.6% White, 3.3% Black, 1.7% Asian, 4.3% Hispanic, 0.5% Native American, 0.2% other
Cook PVI D+6

Connecticut District 2 is represented in the 111th Congress by Democrat Joe Courtney. George W. Bush received 44% of the vote in this district in 2004.[1] The district covers eastern Connecticut, including New London and Norwich. Courtney won an extremely close race against incumbent Republican Rob Simmons involving a town-by-town recount; at one point his lead was 65 votes or less.[2]

In 2008, Courtney was re-elected to a second term, defeating Republican opponent Sean Sullivan, the former commander of the Naval Submarine Base New London.[3]

Barack Obama won the second in 2008 with 59% of the vote, although it's generally considered a swing district.

Contents

Elections

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2008

US House election, 2008: Connecticut District 2
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Joe Courtney (inc.) 210,786 65.5
Republican Sean Sullivan 104,029 32.3
Green G. Scott Deshefy 6,895 2.1
Democratic hold Swing
Turnout

2006

Voter Registration and Party Enrollment as of October 25, 2005[4]
Party Active Voters Inactive Voters Total Voters Percentage
  Democratic 119,995 5,501 125,496 28.94%
  Republican 90,371 4,174 94,545 21.80%
  Unaffiliated 201,003 12,027 213,030 49.12%
  Minor Parties 580 48 628 0.14%
Total 411,949 21,750 433,699 100%
US House election, 2006: Connecticut District 2[5]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Joe Courtney 121,252 50.02%
Republican Rob Simmons (inc.) 121,158 49.98%
Democratic gain from Republican Swing
Turnout 242,410

Towns of the 2nd Congressional District of Connecticut

The district includes the whole of each of the following towns, except where a percentage appears. Such a percentage notation indicates the proportion, to the nearest percent, of the corresponding town's population who were living, at the time of the 1990 U.S. Census, within the new boundary established in 1991 for the 2nd CD.[6]

Representatives

Representative Party Years District home Note
District organized from Connecticut's At-large congressional district in 1837
Samuel Ingham Democratic March 4, 1837 – March 3, 1839 Lost Re-election
William L. Storrs Whig March 4, 1839 – June, 1840 Resigned on appointment as associate justice to Connecticut Supreme Court
Vacant June, 1840 – December 7, 1840
William Whiting Boardman Whig December 7, 1840 – March 3, 1843 Declined Nomination
John Stewart Democratic March 4, 1843 – March 3, 1845 Lost Re-election
Samuel D. Hubbard Whig March 4, 1845 – March 3, 1849
Walter Booth Free Soil March 4, 1849 – March 3, 1851 Lost Re-election
Colin M. Ingersoll Democratic March 4, 1851 – March 3, 1855
John Woodruff American March 4, 1855 – March 3, 1857 Lost Re-election
Samuel Arnold Democratic March 4, 1857 – March 3, 1859 Declined Nomination
John Woodruff Republican March 4, 1859 – March 3, 1861 Declined Nomination
James E. English Democratic March 4, 1861 – March 3, 1865 Declined Nomination
Samuel L. Warner Republican March 4, 1865 – March 3, 1867 Declined Nomination
Julius Hotchkiss Democratic March 4, 1867 – March 3, 1869
Stephen Wright Kellogg Republican March 4, 1869 – March 3, 1875 Lost Re-election
James Phelps Democratic March 4, 1875 – March 3, 1883 Declined Nomination
Charles Le Moyne Mitchell Democratic March 4, 1883 – March 3, 1887 Declined Nomination
Carlos French Democratic March 4, 1887 – March 3, 1889 Declined Nomination
Washington F. Willcox Democratic March 4, 1889 – March 3, 1893 Declined Nomination
James P. Pigott Democratic March 4, 1893 – March 3, 1895 Lost Re-election
Nehemiah D. Sperry Republican March 4, 1895 – March 3, 1911 Retired
Thomas L. Reilly Democratic March 4, 1911 – March 3, 1913 Re-districted to 3rd District
Bryan F. Mahan Democratic March 4, 1913 – March 3, 1915 Lost Re-election
Richard P. Freeman Republican March 4, 1915 – March 3, 1933 Lost Re-election
William L. Higgins Republican March 4, 1933 – January 3, 1937 Lost Re-election
William J. Fitzgerald Democratic January 3, 1937 – January 3, 1939 Lost Re-election
Thomas R. Ball Republican January 3, 1939 – January 3, 1941 Lost Re-election
William J. Fitzgerald Democratic January 3, 1941 – January 3, 1945 Lost Re-election
John D. McWilliams Republican January 3, 1943 – January 3, 1945 Lost Re-election
Chase G. Woodhouse Democratic January 3, 1945 – January 3, 1947 Lost Re-election
Horace Seely-Brown, Jr. Republican January 3, 1947 – January 3, 1949 Pomfret Lost Re-election
Chase G. Woodhouse Democratic January 3, 1949 – January 3, 1951 Lost Re-election
Horace Seely-Brown, Jr. Republican January 3, 1951 – January 3, 1959 Pomfret Lost Re-election
Chester Bowles Democratic January 3, 1959 – January 3, 1961 Declined Nomination, Appointed Under Secretary of State
Horace Seely-Brown, Jr. Republican January 3, 1961 – January 3, 1963 Pomfret Retired to run for U.S. Senate
William St. Onge Democratic January 3, 1963 – May 1, 1970 Putnam Died
Vacant May 1, 1970 – November 3, 1970
Robert H. Steele Republican November 3, 1970 – January 3, 1975 Vernon Retired to run for Governor
Chris Dodd Democratic January 3, 1975 – January 3, 1981 Norwich Retired to run for US Senate
Sam Gejdenson Democratic January 3, 1981 – January 3, 2001 Bozrah Lost Re-election
Rob Simmons Republican January 3, 2001 – January 3, 2007 Stonington Lost Re-election
Joe Courtney Democratic January 3, 2007 – present Vernon Incumbent

References

  1. ^ Ted Mann (2006-11-15). "Recount Confirms Courtney Victory". The Day. http://theday.com/re.aspx?re=9dc80a93-619e-4557-bcb8-f8fc7c78fb44. Retrieved 2006-11-15. 
  2. ^ David Kurtz (2006-11-13). "Election Central has...". Talking Points Memo. http://www.talkingpointsmemo.com/archives/011079.php. Retrieved 2006-11-13. 
  3. ^ Dankosky, John; Blanksteen, Melissa (2008-04-15). "2nd District Challenger Sean Sullivan". Where We Live. Connecticut Public Broadcasting. http://www.cpbn.org/program/where-we-live/episode/sean-sullivan. Retrieved 2008-10-13. 
  4. ^ "Registration and Party Enrollment Statistics as of October 25, 2005" (PDF). Connecticut Secretary of State. http://www.sots.ct.gov/ElectionsServices/lists/2005OctRegEnrollStats.pdf. Retrieved 2006-10-02. 
  5. ^ http://www.sots.ct.gov/ElectionsServices/election_results/2006_Nov_Election/Congress.pdf 2006 Official Election Results
  6. ^ "Connecticut State Register and Manual, "2001 Congresssional Districting" [sic, Congressional District 2 table"]. [CT] Secretary of the State. http://www.sots.ct.gov/sots/cwp/view.asp?a=3188&q=392452. Retrieved 2008-11-17. 
  7. ^ "Connecticut State Register and Manual, "2001 Congresssional Districting" [sic, Congressional District 2 and Congressional District 3 tables"]. [CT] Secretary of the State. http://www.sots.ct.gov/sots/cwp/view.asp?a=3188&q=392452. Retrieved 2008-11-17. 
  8. ^ "Connecticut State Register and Manual, "2001 Congresssional Districting" [sic, Congressional District 1 and Congressional District 2 tables"]. [CT] Secretary of the State. http://www.sots.ct.gov/sots/cwp/view.asp?a=3188&q=392452. Retrieved 2008-11-17. 


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