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.A constellation is a certain area of the celestial sphere.^ An area of the celestial sphere occupied by one of the 88 recognized constellations.
  • constellation - Dictionary definition and pronunciation - Yahoo! Education 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC education.yahoo.com [Source type: Reference]

^ Constellations are now used to designate an area in the celestial sphere.
  • Stars, Constellations, Galaxies and Nebulae Facts 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.kidscosmos.org [Source type: General]

^ To the astronomer, a constellation is not an asterism, but a well-defined area on the celestial sphere.
  • constellations 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.sizes.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Constellation may also refer to:
General
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Science and technology
Fiction and fiction fandom
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Source material

Up to date as of January 22, 2010
(Redirected to The Constellations article)

From Wikisource

The Constellations
by William Cullen Bryant
O constellations of the early night,
That sparkled brighter as the twilight died,
And made the darkness glorious! I have seen
Your rays grow dim upon the horizon's edge,
And sink behind the mountains. .I have seen
The great Orion, with his jewelled belt,
That large-limbed warrior of the skies, go down
Into the gloom.
^ Moving down the belt of Orion, about 20 degrees south, you meet the brightest star called Sirius, also called the Great Dog Star.
  • Well known Stars And Constellations 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www2.potsdam.edu [Source type: General]

^ Ever since people first wandered the Earth, great significance has been given to the celestial objects seen in the sky.
  • Constellations | IAU 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.iau.org [Source type: Academic]

^ Orion (The Hunter) is one of the best known constellations in the sky, having an hourglass shape and the asterisms of Orion's Belt and Orion's Sword.
  • The Stars and Scopes Glossary 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC starsandscopes.net [Source type: Academic]

Beside him sank a crowd
Of shining ones. .I look in vain to find
The group of sister-stars, which mothers love
To show their wondering babes, the gentle Seven.
^ The group of seven twinkling bright stars is a beautiful sight for observation and enjoyment in the night sky.
  • Well known Stars And Constellations 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www2.potsdam.edu [Source type: General]


Along the desert space mine eyes in vain
Seek the resplendent cressets which the Twins
Uplifted in their ever-youthful hands.
The streaming tresses of the Egyptian Queen
Spangle the heavens no more. The Virgin trails
No more her glittering garments through the blue.
Gone! all are gone! and the forsaken .Night,
With all her winds, in all her dreary wastes,
Sighs that they shine upon her face no more.
^ Finally, keep in mind that there is no requirement to have NFPs at all, if they are not needed.
  • CMMI FAQ - brutally honest, totally hip, no nonsense answers (a public service of Entinex) 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.cmmifaq.info [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ For example, I have several family Omegas now more than 50 years old and they still retain all of their original movement parts.

^ All constellations share many things, but fundamentally, they are all nothing more than frameworks for assembling process improvement systems.
  • CMMI FAQ - brutally honest, totally hip, no nonsense answers (a public service of Entinex) 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.cmmifaq.info [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]


.No only here and there a little star
Looks forth alone.
^ And, no, you can't pick them, the Lead Appraiser works with you to pick them; and, no, you can't look at only the "best" aspects of a project and puzzle together all the good-looking evidence from a bunch of different projects.
  • CMMI FAQ - brutally honest, totally hip, no nonsense answers (a public service of Entinex) 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.cmmifaq.info [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Tell me theres no damn way youre letting him look after your son.
  • Constellation 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC members.shaw.ca [Source type: Original source]

^ There is no simple relation about the real and apparent brightness of the stars.
  • Well known Stars And Constellations 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www2.potsdam.edu [Source type: General]

Ah me! I know them not,
Those dim successors of the numberless host
That filled the heavenly fields, and flung to earth
Their guivering fires. .And now the middle watch
Betwixt the eve and morn is past, and still
The darkness gains upon the sky, and still
It closes round my way.
^ He had time right now to do whatever he felt like doing, and it didnt have to be homework, because he was caught up and he still had Sunday morning and Tuesday night if he needed them.
  • Constellation 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC members.shaw.ca [Source type: Original source]

^ The shape of a tea pot, this is a remarkable shape that appears in the night sky close to Milky way.
  • Well known Stars And Constellations 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www2.potsdam.edu [Source type: General]

Shall, then, the Night,
Grow starless in her later hours? Have these
No train of flaming watchers, that shall mark
Their coming and farewell? O Sons of Light!
Have ye then left me ere the dawn of day
To grope along my journey sad and faint?
Thus I complained, and from the darkness round
A voice replied--was it indeed a voice,
Or seeming accents of a waking dream
Heard by the inner ear? But thus it said:
O Traveller of the Night! thine eyes are dim
With watching; and the mists, that chill the vale
Down which thy feet are passing, hide from view
The ever-burning stars. It is thy sight
That is so dark, and not the heaens. .Thine eyes,
Were they but clear, would see a fiery host
Above thee; Hercules, with flashing mace,
The Lyre with silver cords, the Swan uppoised
On gleaming wings, the Dolphin gliding on
With glistening scales, and that poetic steed,
With beamy mane, whose hoof struck out from earth
The fount of Hippocrene, and many more,
Fair clustered splendors, with whose rays the Night
Shall close her march in glory, ere she yield,
To the young Day, the great earth steeped in dew.
^ If the constellation signs truly came from God, they then would be of great importance.
  • Enoch's Constellations Testify of Christ 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.johnpratt.com [Source type: Original source]

^ A quick flash of newly clear green eyes, a curve of full pink lips, and, yes, Lex was leaning forward again.
  • Constellation 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC members.shaw.ca [Source type: Original source]

^ About the time I was about to lose consciousness, about to pass out, they would snatch the bag off, and while I’m trying to catch my breath, they would start beating me again.


.So spake the monitor, and I perceived
How vain were my repinings, and my thought
Went backward to the vanished years and all
The good and great who came and passed with them,
And knew that ever would the years to come
Bring with them, in their course, the good and great,
Lights of the world, though, to my clouded sight,
Their rays might seem but dim, or reach me not.
^ "My thoughts today do not so much concern Constellation herself, mighty as she is, as the men who in the future will write her story; whose actions aboard her will tell all," said Cmdr.
  • U.S. Navy - A Brief History of Aircraft Carriers - USS Constellation (CV 64) 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.chinfo.navy.mil [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ If the constellation signs truly came from God, they then would be of great importance.
  • Enoch's Constellations Testify of Christ 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.johnpratt.com [Source type: Original source]

^ One really good thing about Brodie hes like a light switch when it comes to his sleep schedule.
  • Constellation 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC members.shaw.ca [Source type: Original source]

PD-icon.svg This work published before January 1, 1923 is in the public domain worldwide because the author died at least 100 years ago.

Bible wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From BibleWiki

a cluster of stars, or stars which appear to be near each other in the heavens, and which astronomers have reduced to certain figures (as the "Great Bear," the "Bull," etc.) for the sake of classification and of memory. In Isa. 13:10, where this word only occurs, it is the rendering of the Hebrew kesil, i.e., "fool." .This was the Hebrew name of the constellation Orion (Job 9:9; 38:31), a constellation which represented Nimrod, the symbol of folly and impiety.^ In some cases a diagram of the star pattern made a good symbol - in other cases, I've illustrated the object, creature, or myth represented by the constellation.
  • New Constellation Symbols 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.suberic.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ To the ancients, it represented a centaur (half-man, half-horse) archer who was aiming at the Scorpion (the next constellation) which bit Orion.

^ In star maps it is common to mark line “patterns” that represent the shapes that give the name to the constellations.
  • Constellations | IAU 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.iau.org [Source type: Academic]

.The word some interpret by "the giant" in this place, "some heaven-daring rebel who was chained to the sky for his impiety."^ The constellations, as they were described in Greek mythology, were mostly god-favoured (or cursed) heroes and beasts who received a place in the heavens in memorial of their deeds.
  • Greek Mythology: THE CONSTELLATIONS, STAR MYTHS 1 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.theoi.com [Source type: General]

^ To the ancients, the figure represented the giant Orion, placed in the heavens, in a heroic gesture holding the shield against Taurus the mighty Bull.
  • Well known Stars And Constellations 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www2.potsdam.edu [Source type: General]

^ DOG OF ORION The dog of the giant hunter Orion who stands above it in the heavens.
  • Greek Mythology: THE CONSTELLATIONS, STAR MYTHS 1 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.theoi.com [Source type: General]

This entry includes text from Easton's Bible Dictionary, 1897.
what mentions this? (please help by turning references to this page into wiki links)

Clusters of stars. .The number of constellations named in the Biblical writings is small.^ Later, catalogues of stars were made by naming them by numbers instead of letters but preserving the name of the constellation.
  • Well known Stars And Constellations 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www2.potsdam.edu [Source type: General]

^ Tucana, the Toucan Another one of the southern constellations name for exotic birds, this constellation is the home of the Small Magellanic Cloud.
  • Stories Behind the Constellations 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.pooh-corner.org [Source type: General]

.In view of the extensive astronomical attainments of the Assyro-Babylonians, it is safe to predicate of the Hebrews larger knowledge of the starry heavens (compare Ps.^ Astronomy: Roen Kelly [ View Larger Image ] On a winter evening, the sky is home to what most astronomers agree is the grandest of all constellations — Orion the Hunter .
  • Astronomy.com - Learn the constellations 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.astronomy.com [Source type: General]

viii.) than appears from references actually embodied in .Biblical literature; and there is no necessity for accepting Stern's explanation that only such celestial bodies were regarded with interest by the Hebrews as were of importance for calendric purposes in ushering in the seasons (Stern, in Geiger's "Jüd.^ There is no prescribed method for connecting the stars to form the figure, so the pictures will often vary slightly depending upon the personal preferences of the celestial cartographer.
  • Constellations and Mythologies 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.astronomy.org [Source type: General]

^ In all this there is no novelty...case that arises not unfrequently in astronomy , in which a fact of broad general...regarded as a noteworthy achievement in astronomy , nor is the result to which it...
  • Constellation in Astronomy: Free Encyclopedia Articles at Questia.com Online Library 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.questia.com [Source type: Academic]

^ Theres no such word as flatulating, Lex added.
  • Constellation 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC members.shaw.ca [Source type: Original source]

Zeit." iii. 258; Friedrich Delitzsch, "Hiob," p. 169; see also Astronomy).

The Great Bear.

."'Ash" or "'Ayish" is mentioned twice in Job (Job 9:9, Job 38:32, R. V.), and has been identified with the Great Bear, though this identification has been rejected by many Biblical scholars.^ Other 16 bright stars can be identified with reference to The Big Dipper (Ursa Major), a part of the Great Bear constellation.
  • Well known Stars And Constellations 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www2.potsdam.edu [Source type: General]

.The Arabs certainly knew this brilliant cluster of stars by the name of "Na'sh" (the Bier); and the three stars in the tail they designated as "Banat Na'sh" (the Daughters of the Bier); i.e., the "followers," an appellation still in vogue in modern Syria.^ The last three constellations are modern astronomical images providing identification for a few fainter stars unattacged to the older groups.
  • Constellation families 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.maa.mhn.de [Source type: General]

^ A cluster or group of fixed stars, or dvision of the heavens, designated in most cases by the name of some animal, or of some mythologial personage, within whose imaginary outline, as traced upon the heavens, the group is included.
  • constellation@Everything2.com 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Much of Greek Mythology is linked to the objects in the sky, though whether they grouped the stars according to their myths or created their myths to explain the star clusters, I could not say.
  • constellation@Everything2.com 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

A legend is connected therewith, according to which Gedi (the pole-star) slew Na'sh, whose children now are intent upon avenging the murder; while "Suhail" (Canopus) would rush to the slayer's aid (Wetzstein, in Franz Delitzsch, "Hiob," 2d ed., p. 501). .The assumed etymological affinity between "'Ash" and "Na'sh" is more than doubtful.^ I really want to take it this term, but the workload is more than I can handle between the farm and Brodie.
  • Constellation 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC members.shaw.ca [Source type: Original source]

Still, in Job 38:32 the "children" are also introduced, while it would be strange if this most brilliant group were omitted from Job 9:9.

"'Ash."

The vocalization "'Ayush" is proposed by Hoffmann (in Stade's "Zeitschrift," iii. 107); "'Iyush," by Brown-Briggs (Gesenius, s.v.); and "'Esch," by Friedrich Delitzsch (in "Hiob," xxxviii. 32), who previously identified it with "Moth," a star known as such to the Assyrians ("Assyr. Handwörterb." s.v. "săsu"), but in his "Hiob," in ix. 9, translates by the German equivalent of "Great Bear." Luther renders "Wagen" (Wagon), and in this has been followed by Ideler ("Sternnamen," pp. 21 et seq.), Hirzel, Ewald, Franz Delitzsch, Hitzig; and R. V. Stern (l.c.) maintains that the Pleiades are meant—a view accepted by Schrader, Nöldeke (Schenkel's "Bibel-Lexikon," iv. 370), and G. Hoffmann (l.c.). Merx writes "Canopus." Of the old versions, the LXX. in Job ix. 9 has Πλειάς, and in ib. xxxviii. 32, Ἕσπερος. The Vulgate and A. V. in ix. 9 have "Arcturus," and "Vesperus" and "Arcturus" respectively in xxxviii. 32. Targum in the former verse gives the Hebrew word; in the latter renders by the Aramaic for "hen" (=Pleiades). The Syriac has "'Iyuta" (= Aldabaran; see Merx, in xxxviii.) or the Hyades, which Jensen (l.c.) also suggests. Of this Syriac word, the Talmudical (image) in some manuscripts), Ber. 58b, is the East Aramaic form. .According to Levy, the latter is the seven-starred (Little) Bear; but in the passage itself R. Judah explains it as the tail of the Ram, if not the head of the Wagon or, according to Rashi, of the Bull.^ The IAU reforms assigned the shared stars to Ophiuchus, leaving Serpens in two disjoint pieces: Serpens Caput (the Serpent's Head) and Serpens Cauda (the Serpent's Tail).
  • SkyandTelescope.com - How To - Constellation Names and Abbreviations 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.skyandtelescope.com [Source type: General]

^ The Pleiades are a nearby star cluster (Seven Sisters) which occupy a small portion of the constellation of Taurus, the bull, while the Great Square of Pegasus represents the horses body.
  • Constellations and Mythologies 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.astronomy.org [Source type: General]

^ Look for...The planet begins the month in the constellation Taurus, the bull, seven and...from the bright star Capella, in the constellation Auriga, the charioteer.
  • Constellation in Astronomy: Free Encyclopedia Articles at Questia.com Online Library 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.questia.com [Source type: Academic]

.Kohut ("Aruch Completum," s.v.) derives it, as Stern and others before him, from the Greek ϒάδες, and explains it as a cluster of seven stars in the head of Taurus.^ It contains more bright stars clustered together than any other single group.
  • Well known Stars And Constellations 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www2.potsdam.edu [Source type: General]

^ The Pleiades are a nearby star cluster (Seven Sisters) which occupy a small portion of the constellation of Taurus, the bull, while the Great Square of Pegasus represents the horses body.
  • Constellations and Mythologies 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.astronomy.org [Source type: General]

^ Look for...The planet begins the month in the constellation Taurus, the bull, seven and...from the bright star Capella, in the constellation Auriga, the charioteer.
  • Constellation in Astronomy: Free Encyclopedia Articles at Questia.com Online Library 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.questia.com [Source type: Academic]

Of medieval Jewish commentators, Saadia identifies it with the Bear; ReDaḲ, again, in his dictionary, under (image) , explains (image) as the tail of the Ram. Ibn Ezra merely states that (image) = "seven stars." .Gersonides locates it as a constellation "within the sphere of the fixed stars."^ This star, located in the constellation Carina, is said to be Canopus, an island in the Nile.
  • CONSTELLATIONS & STARS - Greek Mythology Link 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC homepage.mac.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Normally the team with the constellation information will locate the star cluster more rapidly, thus providing a practical reason for still using the constellations in the twentieth century.
  • Constellations and Mythologies 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.astronomy.org [Source type: General]

^ Star locations are accurate to within 1 minute of right ascension and 6 minutes of declination.
  • Science First :: STARLAB 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.starlab.com [Source type: General]

What terrestrial being (image) is, is not known. Ewald thinks of the Arabic "'ayyath" (lion), and says that the Hebrews called the group the "Lioness and Her Whelps."
Orion is undoubtedly designated by the Hebrew "Kesil" ("Fool"; see below) in Job ix. 9, xxxviii. 31; Amos v. 8; Isa. xiii. .10. Of the ancient versions, the LXX. has "Orion" in Job and Isaiah, while Targum and Peshiṭta render by "Giant."^ To the ancients, the figure represented the giant Orion, placed in the heavens, in a heroic gesture holding the shield against Taurus the mighty Bull.
  • Well known Stars And Constellations 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www2.potsdam.edu [Source type: General]

.In this there is a reminiscence of an ancient, perhaps pre-Semitic, myth—also current in variants among the Greeks—concerning a giant bound to the sky, whom the Hebrews, with characteristic reflection upon his presumption to resist and defy heavenly power, labeled "Fool."^ As a result the Greeks had a number of alternate myths describing each of the star groups, as the foreign traditions were translated in different ways by the various regions and poetical traditions of ancient Greece.
  • Greek Mythology: THE CONSTELLATIONS, STAR MYTHS 1 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.theoi.com [Source type: General]

^ Much of Greek Mythology is linked to the objects in the sky, though whether they grouped the stars according to their myths or created their myths to explain the star clusters, I could not say.
  • constellation@Everything2.com 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The Greek myths are not much help here; there are many variations, but most agree that the Swan represented Zeus in disguise.
  • Enoch's Constellations Testify of Christ 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.johnpratt.com [Source type: Original source]

Nimrod was associated with this "Fool" by later folk-lore. The question in Job about loosening the bands (xxxviii. .31) has reference to this, and not, as Dillmann contends (commentary, ad loc.), to the rise and fall of the stars according as the "rope with which they are drawn" is tightened or slacked.^ The constellation paintings below were made according to astronomical maps and the size of the pebbles has been carefully chosen in accordance with the magnitude and brightness of the stars they represent.

^ Much of Greek Mythology is linked to the objects in the sky, though whether they grouped the stars according to their myths or created their myths to explain the star clusters, I could not say.
  • constellation@Everything2.com 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Most ancient astronomers carefully followed tradition about exactly where to place every star because they believed that the "gods" had drawn the figures.
  • Enoch's Constellations Testify of Christ 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.johnpratt.com [Source type: Original source]

The Jewish medieval commentators hold the "Kesil" to have been either the Arabic "Suhail" (= Canopus) or Sirius. On the plural, in Isa. xiii. 10, see Jensen, l.c. (note also his suggestion that "Kesil" is a generic name for "comet").
"Kimah" (Job ix. 9, xxxviii. 31; Amos v. 8) is the "Hen" (Luther) with her brood. .Etymologically, the name signifies "a heap," and is thus very appropriately descriptive of the cluster, now known as the Pleiades, in the zodiacal sign of the Bull.^ The cluster is the head of the well known constellation "Taurus" the bull, named by the Greeks.
  • Well known Stars And Constellations 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www2.potsdam.edu [Source type: General]

Pleiades.

Stern (l.c.) argues that "Kimah" is Sirius. In the Talmud occurs this statement: "But for the heat of Kesil, the world could not endure, on account of the excessive cold of the Pleiades, and vice versa" (Ber. 59a; B. M. 106b). "Kimah" is qualified as a planet ( (image) ; Ber. 58a); the etymology (image) is, of course, fanciful. The setting of the Pleiades is said to have been the cause of the Flood (Yer. Ta'an. i. 64a, at foot). According to Abu al-Walid, "Kimah" is the Arabic "Al-Thurayya" (= Pleiades). .Ibn Ezra reports that his predecessors held it to be a group of seven stars in the tail of the Ram, but he believes it to be a single star, "the left eye of Taurus."^ A fishhook-shaped row of stars trailing down and to the left of Antares forms the Scorpion's tail and stinger, while an upright row of three stars to Antares's right marks the location of its claws.
  • Astronomy.com - Learn the constellations 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.astronomy.com [Source type: General]

^ It contains more bright stars clustered together than any other single group.
  • Well known Stars And Constellations 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www2.potsdam.edu [Source type: General]

^ Look for...The planet begins the month in the constellation Taurus, the bull, seven and...from the bright star Capella, in the constellation Auriga, the charioteer.
  • Constellation in Astronomy: Free Encyclopedia Articles at Questia.com Online Library 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.questia.com [Source type: Academic]

In Job xxxviii. 31 A. V. occurs the puzzling phrase "the sweet influences of Pleiades" (R. V. "cluster of the Pleiades"; margin, "chain"); (image) , as shown by the parallelism with the "bands of Orion," and the expression "canst thou bind," is a transposition of (image) ("chains" or "fetters"). Some mythological allusion is probably hidden in the expression.
Ḳimḥi's explanation, that the reference is to the ripening of the fruit ("Kesil"), or the reverse ("Kimah"), is plainly too rationalistic, notwithstanding the Talmudic authority he quotes or the opinion of his father (under (image) ).
What "Mazzarot" (Job xxxviii. 32) may be is still unsettled. Perhaps it is identical with "Mazzalot" (II Kings xxiii. 5). If so, it might designate Saturn or the seven planets. Stern (l.c.) would have this strange expression denote the Hyades. .Ewald, for the passage in Job, claims the reference to be to the Northern and Southern Crowns, corresponding to the "chambers of the South" ("Teman") in Job ix.^ Triangulum Australe, the Southern Triange Much more prominent than its northern counterpart, Triangulum , this group lies south of Norma .
  • Stories Behind the Constellations 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.pooh-corner.org [Source type: General]

^ This constellation is sometimes referred to as the "Southern Cross", the "Northern Cross" being a nickname for Cygnus .
  • Stories Behind the Constellations 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.pooh-corner.org [Source type: General]

.9. Others have suggested the constellation of the Southern Ship, characterized in an Arabic translation as the "heart of the South"; others again suggest Sirius.^ Greek constellations on which our present-day...translated into Arabic in about AD 820, means...mission was the X-ray astronomy satellite Ariel...gen.
  • Constellation in Astronomy: Free Encyclopedia Articles at Questia.com Online Library 10 February 2010 13:42 UTC www.questia.com [Source type: Academic]

Friedrich Delitzsch leaves the problem open, simply transliterating the Hebrew (see his "Hiob," p. 169, note to verses 31 et seq.). It has also been held to designate the Zodiac.
According to Schrader (Schenkel, "Bibel-Lexikon," v. 398), the constellation of the Dragon is mentioned in Job xxii. 13 (R. V. "swift serpent"); but this is very problematic. Winckler has suggested to read for "Nadgalot"; in Cant. iv. 4, 10, "Nergalot"; i.e., the Twins (Gemini; see "Altorientalische, Forschungen," i. 293).
Bibliography: Ideler, Sternamen, 1869; the commentaries on Job of Dillmann, Hitzig, Merx, Ewald, Franz Delitzsch; Winer, B. R. ii. 526 et seq.; Riehm, Wörterbuch, 2d ed., ii. 1573 et seq.; Hastings, Dict. Bible, s.v. Astronomy; Schenkel, Bibelwörterbuch, iv. 370, v., s.v. Sterne.
This entry includes text from the Jewish Encyclopedia, 1906.

Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 30, 2010

Here are sentences from other pages on Constellation, which are similar to those in the above article.








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