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Consumer sovereignty is a term which is used in economics to refer to the rule or sovereignty of purchasers in markets as to production of goods. It is the power of consumers to decide what gets produced. People use the this term to describe the consumer as the "king," or ruler, of the market, the one who determines what products will be produced. [1] Also, this term denotes the way in which a consumer ideologically choices to buy a good or service. Furthermore, the term can be used as either a norm (as to what consumers should be permitted) or a description (as to what consumers are permitted).

In unrestricted markets, those with income or wealth are able to use their purchasing power to motivate producers as what to produce (and how much). Customers do not necessarily have to buy and, if dissatisfied, can take their business elsewhere, while the profit-seeking sellers find that they can make the greatest profit by trying to provide the best possible products for the price (or the lowest possible price for a given product). In the language of cliché, "The one with the gold makes the rules."

To most neoclassical economists, complete consumer sovereignty is an ideal rather than a reality because of the existence -- or even the ubiquity -- of market failure. Some economists of the Chicago school and the Austrian school see consumer sovereignty as a reality in a free market economy without interference from government or other non-market institutions, or anti-market institutions such as monopolies or cartels. That is, alleged market failures are seen as being a result of non-market forces.

The term "consumer sovereignty" was coined by William Hutt who firstly used it in his 1936 book "Economists and the Public". [[Media:Examp le.ogg

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Contents

See also

Citations

  • Campbell R. McConnell and Stanley L. Brue (1999, 14th ed.), Economics. McGraw-Hill, p. 68.

References

  1. ^ Sullivan, arthur; Steven M. Sheffrin (2003). Economics: Principles in action. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey 07458: Pearson Prentice Hall. pp. 32. ISBN 0-13-063085-3. http://www.pearsonschool.com/index.cfm?locator=PSZ3R9&PMDbSiteId=2781&PMDbSolutionId=6724&PMDbCategoryId=&PMDbProgramId=12881&level=4.  

External links

  • Persky, Joseph, “Retrospectives: Consumer Sovereignty,” Journal of Economic

Perspectives, 7 (1993), 183-191.

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