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Cotton Belt Rail Line
Overview
Type Commuter rail
System Dallas Area Rapid Transit
Status Planning
Locale Dallas County, Texas
Termini Bush Turnpike Station
DFW North Station
Website DART Cotton Belt Rail Line
Operation
Owner Dallas Area Rapid Transit
Operator(s) Dallas Area Rapid Transit
Technical
Line length 26 mi (41.84 km)
Track length 26 mi (41.84 km)
Track gauge 4 ft 8+12 in (1,435 mm) (standard gauge)
Operating speed 0 mph (0 km/h)

The Cotton Belt Rail Line is a planned 26-mile (42 km) commuter rail line in Dallas County, Texas, United States that will provide service from Dallas's northeast suburbs to DFW Airport. It will be operated by Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) and will serve as a crosstown route in northern Dallas County, connecting the Red Line in Plano, the Addison Transit Center, the Green Line in Carrollton (where it will also connect with the Denton County Transportation Authority's proposed northbound A-train[1]), and the Orange Line (future) at DFW Airport (where it will also connect to the Fort Worth Transportation Authority's hoped-for Southwest-to-Northeast Rail Corridor to southwest Tarrant County[2]). It will also pass through a portion of the city of Coppell, a charter member of DART that later pulled out of the system in 1989, though the possibility of rail service may entice Coppell to rejoin.

The line is part of DART's 2030 Plan with hopes of opening sometime near 2013[3]; no color designation has been given for this planned line. The current name for the line comes from the St. Louis Southwestern Railway, a former subsidiary of the Southern Pacific Railroad commonly known as the Cotton Belt Railroad, which previously owned the line.

References

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