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The Council on Chiropractic Education (CCE) is the agency recognized by the U.S. Secretary of Education for accreditation of programs and institutions offering the doctor of chiropractic degree. CCE seeks to insure the quality of chiropractic education in the United States by means of accreditation, educational improvement and public information. CCE develops accreditation criteria to assess how effectively programs or institutions plan, implement and evaluate their mission and goals, program objectives, inputs, resources and outcomes of their chiropractic programs. The CCE is also recognized by the Council for Higher Education (CHEA) and is a member of the Association of Specialized and Professional Accreditors (ASPA).

History

Throughout the 1920s, debate between the Universal Chiropractic Association (UCA) and its competing American Chiropractic Association (ACA) revolved around the quality of education within the chiropractic profession. In 1930, the two associations merged to form the NCA and by 1935 John Nugent, DC, who had played a significant role in developing the Basic Science Board for all healthcare providers, became the first Director of the Committee on Education Standards (CES). Under his direction, efforts were implemented that led to the formation of what would become today's CCE.

Between 1935 and 1940, national chiropractic associations such as the NCA; the Chiropractic Health Bureau (CHB); and the Council on State Chiropractic Examining Boards (CSCEB) worked to support improvements in chiropractic education. The NCA transformed into the American Chiropractic Association (ACA) and the Chiropractic Health Bureau became the International Chiropractors Association (ICA).

In 1938 the CES and CSCEB merged into a new CES. Under the direction of this committee the first institution self-study questionnaire was sent to all 37 chiropractic institutions actively engaged in chiropractic education in the United States. In 1941, after independent inspection of the schools and evaluation of the educational criteria, the CES issued its first list of institutions with status; the list contained 12 provisionally approved institutions.

The Council on Education (COE) was formed by institutional representatives and members of the CES. On August 4, 1947, this Council received the approval and support of the House of Delegates of the NCA. From 1941 to 1961 the Council continued to work to improve chiropractic education, merging weaker institutions with other institutions to create stronger academic programs. A number of the grossly substandard institutions were closed. By 1961, the original 37 chiropractic schools were reduced to 10 institutions.

In 1964 the NCA merged with other groups to form the current ACA with continued support for the Council on Education. In 1971 this committee was incorporated as the Council on Chiropractic Education (CCE), an autonomous national organization, separate from the ACA. It continues to function as such.

The CCE was first listed as a Nationally Recognized Accrediting Agency by the U.S. Commissioner of Education (USCE) in 1974 and has kept its status since that time. In 1975 The CCE was also accepted as a member of the Council of Specialized Accrediting Agencies. It has also been recognized by the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation (COPA) from 1978 through 1992. In 1992, the CCE was granted continued recognition by the Council on Recognition of Postsecondary Education (CORPA) for a five-year period to 1997, and, in 1997, until 2002, and is now recognized by the successor, Council on Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA).

References

The Council on Chiropractic Education (CCE) www.cce-usa.org

External links

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