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County Antrim
Contae Aontroma
Coat of arms of County Antrim
Motto: Per angusta ad augusta  (Latin)
"Through Trial to Triumph"
Location
Map highlighting County Antrim
Statistics
Province: Ulster
County seat: Antrim
Area: 2,844 km2 (1,098 sq mi)
Population (est.) 616,384[citation needed]

County Antrim (Irish: Contae Aontroma or simply Aontroim) is one of the traditional counties of Ireland. It is located within the province of Ulster and is part of Northern Ireland. It was named after the town of Antrim.

Covering an area of 2,844 km², it has a population of approximately 616,000, most of them in and around the Belfast area. The Glens of Antrim offer isolated rugged landscapes, the Giant's Causeway is a unique landscape and a UNESCO World Heritage site, Bushmills produces legendary whiskey, and Portrush is a popular seaside resort and night-life area. The majority of the capital city of Northern Ireland, Belfast, is also in County Antrim, with the remainder being in County Down.

Contents

Geology

Fair Head seen from Ballycastle
Columnar basalt at Giant's Causeway
Belfast International Airport
Lisburn railway station
Larne Harbour

A large portion of Antrim is hilly, especially in the east, where the highest elevations are attained. The range runs north and south, and, following this direction the highest points are Knocklayd (1,695 ft), Slieveanorra (1,676 ft), Trostan (1,817 ft), Slemish (1,457 ft) and Divis (1,567 ft). The inland slope is gradual, but on the northern shore the range terminates in abrupt and almost perpendicular declivities, and here, consequently, some of the finest coast scenery in the world is found, widely differing, with its unbroken lines of cliffs, from the indented coast-line of the west. The most remarkable cliffs are those formed of perpendicular basaltic columns, extending for many miles, and most strikingly displayed in Fair Head and the celebrated Giant's Causeway. From the eastern coast the hills rise instantly but less abruptly, and the indentations are wider and deeper. On both coasts there are several resort towns, including Portrush (with well-known golf links), Portballintrae and Ballycastle; on the east Cushendun, Cushendall and Waterfoot on Red Bay, Carnlough and Glenarm, Larne on the Sea of Moyle, and Whitehead on Belfast Lough. All are somewhat exposed to the easterly winds prevalent in spring. The only island of size is Rathlin Island, off Ballycastle, 6½ miles in length by 1½ in breadth, 7 miles from the coast, and of similar basaltic and limestone formation to that of the mainland. It is partially arable, and supports a small population. Islandmagee is in fact a peninsula separating Larne Lough from the North Channel.

The valleys of the Bann and Lagan, with the intervening shores of Lough Neagh, form the fertile lowlands. These two rivers, both rising in County Down, are the only ones of importance. The latter flows to Belfast Lough, the former drains Lough Neagh, which is fed by a number of smaller streams. The fisheries of the Bann and of Lough Neagh (especially for salmon and eels) are of value both commercially and to sportsmen, the small town of Toome, at the outflow of the river, being the centre. Immediately below this point lies Lough Beg, the "Small Lake," about fifteen feet lower than Lough Neagh.

Transport

County Antrim has a number of air, rail and sea links.

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Air

Northern Ireland's main airport, Belfast International Airport, at Aldergrove is in County Antrim. Belfast International shares its runways with the Royal Air Force base RAF Aldergrove, which otherwise has its own facilities.[citation needed] It is the fifth largest regional air cargo centre in the UK. There are regular services to Great Britain, Europe and North America.

The region is also served by George Best Belfast City Airport, a mile east of Belfast city centre on the County Down side of the city, which was renamed in 2006 in honour of footballer George Best.

Rail

See also: Category:Railway stations in County Antrim

The main Translink Northern Ireland Railways routes are the major line between Belfast, Antrim, Ballymena, Coleraine and Londonderry, Belfast to Carrickfergus and Larne, the port for Stranraer in Scotland and Coleraine to Portrush.

Sea

Two of Northern Ireland's main ports are in County Antrim, Larne and Belfast.

Ferries sail from Larne Harbour to destinations including Cairnryan and Troon in Scotland, and Fleetwood in England.

The Port of Belfast is Northern Ireland's principal maritime gateway, serving the Northern Ireland economy and increasingly that of the Republic of Ireland. It is a major centre of industry and commerce and has become established as the focus of logistics activity for Northern Ireland. Around two thirds of Northern Ireland's seaborne trade, and a quarter of that for Ireland as a whole, is handled at the port which receives over 6,000 vessels each year[1].

Population

The population of County Antrim was 616,384 according to recent census information. It is one of two counties of Northern Ireland to presently have a majority of the population from a Protestant community background, according to the 2001 census (the other being County Down), and it is the most populous county in Northern Ireland.

Religion

Presbyterianism is the largest religious denomination, followed by Roman Catholicism and Anglicanism. County Antrim is one of two counties in Ireland in which the majority of people are Protestant, the other being Down. The strong Presbyterian presence in the county is due largely to the county's historical links with Scotland.

Administration

The traditional county town is Antrim. More recently, Ballymena was the seat of county government. The counties of Northern Ireland ceased to be administrative entities in 1973, with the reorganization of local government.

In Northern Ireland the county structure is no longer used in local government. Northern Ireland is split into districts. The majority of County Antrim residents are administered by the following nine councils:

Small portions of the county are administered by councils that are based in neighbouring counties, notably the village of Aghagallon in the Craigavon Borough and the town of Portrush in the Coleraine Borough.

The county contains all of five parliamentary constituencies:

Parts of the following constituencies are also in County Antrim:

Settlements

Ballycastle
Carnlough

Large towns

(population of 18,000 or more and under 75,000 at 2001 Census)[2]

Medium towns

(population of 10,000 or more and under 18,000 at 2001 Census)[2]

  • none

Small towns

(population of 4,500 or more and under 10,000 at 2001 Census)[2]

Intermediate settlements

(population of 2,250 or more and under 4,500 at 2001 Census)[2]

Villages

(population of 1,000 or more and under 2,250 at 2001 Census)[2]

Small villages or hamlets

(population of less than 1,000 at 2001 Census)[2]

Subdivisions

Baronies

  • Antrim Lower (Aontroim Íochtarach)
  • Antrim Upper (Aontroim Uachtarach)
  • Belfast Lower (Béal Feirste Íochtarach)
  • Belfast Upper (Béal Feirste Uachtarach)
  • Carrickfergus (Carraig Fhearghais)
  • Cary (Cathraí)
  • Dunluce Lower (Dún Libhse Íochtarach)
  • Dunluce Upper (Dún Libhse Uachtarach)
  • Glenarm Lower (Gleann Arma Íochtarach)
  • Glenarm Upper (Gleann Arma Uachtarach)
  • Kilconway (Coill Chonmhaí)
  • Massereene Lower (Mása Ríona Íochtarach)
  • Massereene Upper (Mása Ríona Uachtarach)
  • Toome Lower (Tuaim Íochtarach)
  • Toome Upper (Tuaim Uachtarach)

Parishes

Townlands

History

Royal Avenue, Belfast. Photochrom print circa 1890-1900.

At what date the county of Antrim was formed is not known, but it appears that a certain district bore this name before the reign of Edward II (early 14th century), and when the shiring of Ulster was undertaken by Sir John Perrot in the 16th century, Antrim and Down were already recognized divisions, in contradistinction to the remainder of the province. The earliest known inhabitants were of Celtic origin,[citation needed] and the names of the townlands or subdivisions, supposed to have been made in the 13th century, are all of Gaelic derivation. Antrim was exposed to the inroads of the Danes, and also of the northern Scots, who ultimately effected permanent settlements.

In ancient times, it was inhabited by a Celtic[citation needed] people called the Darini. In the early Middle Ages, southern County Antrim was part of the Kingdom of Ulidia, ruled by the Dál Fiatach clans Keenan and MacDonlevy/McDunlavey; the north was part of Dal Riada, which stretched into what is now western Scotland over the Irish Sea. Dal Riada was ruled by the O'Lynch clan, who were vassals of the Ulidians. Besides the Ulidians and Dal Riada, there were the Dal nAraide of lower County Antrim, and the Cruthin, who were not Gaelic Celts but Picts. In the late Middle Ages, it was divided into three parts: northern Clandeboye, the Glynnes and the Route. The Cambro-Norman MacQuillans were powerful in the Route. A branch of the O'Neills of Tyrone migrated to Clandeboye in the 1300s, and ruled it for a time. Their family was called O'Neill Clannaboy. A Gallowglass sept, the MacDonnells, became the most powerful in the Glynnes in the 1400s.

During the Tudor era, the Antrim coast was the scene of one of the 24 wrecks of the Spanish Armada in Ireland. The Spanish vessel La Girona was wrecked off Lacana Point, Giant's Causeway in 1588 with the loss of nearly 1,300 lives.[3]

Antrim is divided into sixteen baronies. Lower Antrim, part of Lower Clandeboye, was settled by the sept O'Flynn/O'Lynn. Upper Antrim, part of Lower Clandeboye, was the home of the O'Keevans. Belfast was part of Lower Clandeboye and was held by the O'Neill-Clannaboys. Lower Belfast, Upper Belfast, and Carrickfergus were also part of Lower Clandeboye. Cary was part of the Glynnes; ruled originally by the O'Quinn sept, the MacDonnell galloglasses from Scotland took power here in the late Middle Ages and some of the O'Haras also migrated from Connaught. Upper and Lower Dunluce were part of the Route, and were ruled by the MacQuillans. Upper and Lower Glenarm was ruled by the O'Flynn/O'Lynn sept, considered part of the Glynns. In addition to that sept and that of O'Quinn, both of which were native, the Scottish Gallowglass septs of MacKeown, MacAlister, and MacGee, are found there. Kilconway was originally O'Flynn/O'Lynn territory, but was held by the MacQuillans as part of the Route, and later by the gallowglass sept of MacNeill. Lower Massereene was part of Lower Clandeboye and was ruled by the O'Flynns and the O'Heircs. Upper Massereene was part of Lower Clandeboye, ruled by the O'Heircs. Upper and Lower Toome, part of the Route, were O'Flynn/O'Lynn territory. Misc was first ruled by the MacQuillans. Later, the Scottish Gallowglass MacDonnells and MacAlisters invaded. The MacDonnells were a branch of the Scottish Clan MacDonald; the MacAlisters traced their origin back to the Irish Colla Uais, eldest of the Three Collas.

Islandmagee had, besides antiquarian remains, a notoriety as a home of witchcraft, and during the Irish Rebellion of 1641 was the scene of an act of reprisal (for the massacre of Protestants) against the Catholic population by the Scottish Covenanter soldiery of Carrickfergus.[citation needed]

Historic monuments

Dunluce Castle.
Carrickferrgus Castle (1177)

See Also: Castles in County Antrim

The antiquities of the county consist of cairns, mounts or forts, remains of ecclesiastical and military structures, and round towers.

There are three round towers: one at Antrim, one at Armoy, and one on Ram Island in Lough Neagh, only that at Antrim being perfect. There are some remains of the ecclesiastic establishments at Bonamargy, where the earls of Antrim are buried, Kells, Glenarm, Glynn, Muckamore and Whiteabbey.

The castle at Carrickfergus, dating from the Norman invasion of Ireland, is one of the best preserved medieval structures in Ireland. There are, however, remains of other ancient castles, as Olderfleet, Cam's, Shane's, Glenarm, Garron Tower, Red Bay, and Dunluce Castle, notable for its dramatic location on a rocky outcrop.

The principal cairns are: one on Colin mountain, near Lisburn; one on Slieve True, near Carrickfergus; and two on Colinward. The cromlechs most worthy of notice are: one near Cairngrainey, to the north-east of the old road from Belfast to Templepatrick; the large cromlech at Mount Druid, near Ballintoy; and one at the northern extremity of Islandmagee. The mounts, forts and entrenchments are very numerous.

The natural rock formations of Giant's Causeway on the Antrim coast are now designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Saint Patrick

Slemish, about eight miles east of Ballymena, is notable as being the scene of St Patrick's early life. According to tradition Saint Patrick was a slave for seven years, near the hill of Slemish, until he escaped back to Great Britain.

Linen

Linen manufacturing was previously an important industry in the County. At the time Ireland produced a large mount of flax. Cotton-spinning by jennies was first introduced by to Belfast by industrialists Robert Joy and Thomas M'Cabe in 1777; an Twenty-three years later it was estimated that more than 27,000 people were employed in the industry within ten miles of Belfast. Women were employed in the working of patterns on muslin.

Notable residents

Flora and fauna

Flora

Records of the seaweeds of County Antrim were brought together and published in 1907 by J. Adams [6] who notes that the list contains 211 species. Batter's list, of 1902,[7] contained 747 species in his catalogue of British marine algae.

See Also:

Sport

See also

References

  1. ^ Port of Belfast
  2. ^ a b c d e f "Statistical classification of settlements". NI Neighbourhood Information Service. http://www.ninis.nisra.gov.uk/mapxtreme_towns/statistical%20classification.htm. Retrieved 23 February 2009. 
  3. ^ "La Girona" (PDF). # Annual Report of the Advisory Committee on Historic Wrecks, 2005. Advisory Committee on Historic Wreck Sites. pp. 35. http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/upload/pdf/ACHWS_annual_report_2005.pdf. Retrieved 2008-11-01. 
  4. ^ a b c Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume, 1607-1896. Chicago: Marquis Who's Who. 1967. 
  5. ^ Cullen, Pamela V., "A Stranger in Blood: The Case Files on Dr John Bodkin Adams", London, Elliott & Thompson, 2006, ISBN 1-904027-19-9
  6. ^ Adams, J. 1907. The Seaweeds of the Antrim Coast. Scient. Pap. Ulster Fish. Biol. Ass. Vol.1: 29 - 37
  7. ^ Batters, E.A.L. 1902. A catalogue of the British marine algae being a list of all the species of seaweed known to occur on the shores of the British Islands, with the localities where they are found. J. Bot., Lond. 40 (suppl.): (2) + 107.

External links


Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

For other places with the same name, see Antrim (disambiguation).

County Antrim is a county in Northern Ireland. The Antrim coast is one of the most beautiful parts of Northern Ireland, with the Antrim Coast Road taking in some of the best scenery in the country.

Understand

The Glens of Antrim offer isolated rugged landscapes, the Giant's Causeway is one of the most striking landscapes on Earth and is a UNESCO World Heritage site, Bushmills produces legendary whiskey, and Portrush is where Northern Ireland goes to party. It is one of Ireland's most fascinating counties. The roads which link the towns of Portrush, Portstewart and Coleraine make up the North West 200 - the world's fastest motorcycle road race circuit.

Antrim the county town is worth a visit with many historical locations and for the bargain hunters a large outlet centre and huge saturday morning bootsale at dunsilly

Map of Antrim
Map of Antrim
  • Ahoghill
  • Ballycarry
  • Bushmills
  • Carnlough
  • Cullybackey
  • Cushendall
  • Cushendun
  • Doagh
  • Dunloy
  • Greenisland
  • Whiteabbey
  • Whitehouse
  • Rathlin Island
  • Glens of Antrim
  • Giant's Causeway
  • Carrickfergus Castle
  • Dunluce Castle

Get in

Belfast International Airport is situated near the town of Antrim, and is convenient for exploring the region. Ferries from Scotland land at Larne.

Get around

Translink [1] operates the public transport system in Antrim.

Eat

Standard Northern Irish fare, but if you're lucky enough to catch the Oul Lammas Fair in Ballycastle (held on the last Monday and Tuesday of August), be sure to try Yallow Man, a rock hard yellow sweet that is eaten with the aid of a hammer. Make sure your dental insurance is up to date first.

Drink

Bushmills Distillery, of course. You can take distillery tours, and you'll likely be more merry going out than when you went in. It's worth noting that at the end of each tour four people from the tour group (two women and two men) are asked to volunteer for a special whiskey tasting, where participants get to try nine different types of whiskey.

US visitors who are unaccustomed to driving on the left are well advised to shun the whiskey tasting. Buy some to take back to your hotel.

Stay safe

Stay sensible, don't wander around urban areas at night or make political statements in strange company, and you'll be just fine.

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Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Familypedia

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County Antrim
Contae Aontroma
Coat of arms of County Antrim
Location
centerMap highlighting County Antrim
Statistics
Province: Ulster
County Town: Antrim
Area: 2,844 km²
Population (est.) 566,000

County Antrim (Contae Aontroma in Irish) is one of the six counties that form Northern Ireland. It is the 9th largest of the 32 traditional counties of Ireland in terms of area, and 2nd in terms of population behind Dublin. It is situated in the north-east of the island of Ireland, in the province of Ulster. It is bounded north and east by the narrow seas separating Northern Ireland from Scotland, the Atlantic Ocean and Irish Sea, south by Belfast Lough and the River Lagan dividing it from County Down, south-west by Lough Neagh, dividing it from County Armagh and County Tyrone, and west by County Londonderry, the boundary with which is the River Bann. Covering an area of 2,844 km², it has a population of approximately 566,000, most of them in and around the Belfast area.

The Glens of Antrim offer isolated rugged landscapes, the Giant's Causeway is a unique landscape and a UNESCO World Heritage site, Bushmills produces legendary whiskey, and Portrush is a popular nightlife zone. The majority of the capital city of Northern Ireland, Belfast, is also in County Antrim, with the remainder being in County Down.

Contents

Geology

Fair Head seen from Ballycastle

A large portion of the county is hilly, especially in the east, where the highest elevations are attained, though these are nowhere great. The range runs north and south, and, following this direction the highest points are Knocklayd (1,695 feet), Slieveanorra (1,676 feet), Trostan (1,817 feet), Slemish (1,457 feet) and Divis (1,567 feet). The inland slope is gradual, but on the northern shore the range terminates in abrupt and almost perpendicular declivities, and here, consequently, some of the finest coast scenery in the world is found, widely differing, with its unbroken lines of cliffs, from the indented coast-line of the west. The most remarkable cliffs are those formed of perpendicular basaltic columns, extending for many miles, and most strikingly displayed in Fair Head and the celebrated Giant's Causeway. From the eastern coast the hills rise instantly but less abruptly, and the indentations are wider and deeper. On both coasts there are several resort towns, including Portrush (with well-known golf links), Portballintrae and Ballycastle; on the east Cushendun, Cushendall and Milltown on Red Bay, Carnlough and Glenarm, Larne, and Whitehead on Belfast Lough. All are somewhat exposed to the easterly winds prevalent in spring. The only island of size is Rathlin Island, off Ballycastle, 6½ miles in length by 1½ in breadth, 7 miles from the coast, and of similar basaltic and limestone formation to that of the mainland. It is partially arable, and supports a small population. Islandmagee is in fact a peninsula separating Larne Lough from the North Channel.

The valleys of the Bann and Lagan, with the intervening shores of Lough Neagh, form the fertile lowlands. These two rivers, both rising in County Down, are the only ones of importance. The latter flows to Belfast Lough, the former drains Lough Neagh, which is fed by a number of smaller streams. The fisheries of the Bann and of Lough Neagh (especially for salmon and eels) are of value both commercially and to sportsmen, the small town of Toome, at the outflow of the river, being the centre. Immediately below this point lies Lough Beg, the "Small Lake," about 15 feet lower than Lough Neagh.

Transport

County Antrim has a number of important air, rail and sea links.

Air

Northern Ireland's main Airport, Belfast International Airport, at Aldergrove is in County Antrim. Belfast International shares its runways with the Royal Air Force base RAF Aldergrove, which otherwise has its own facilities. It is the fifth largest regional air cargo centre in the UK. There are regular services to Great Britain, Europe and North America.

(The region is also served by George Best Belfast City Airport, two kilometres east of Belfast city centre on the Co. Down side of the city, which was renamed in 2006 in honour of footballer George Best.)

Rail

The main Translink Northern Ireland Railways routes are the major line between Belfast, Antrim, Ballymena, Coleraine and Londonderry, Belfast to Carrickfergus and Larne, the port for Stranraer in Scotland and Coleraine to Portrush.

See Also:

  • Railway Stations in County Antrim

Sea

Two of Northern Ireland's main ports are in County Antrim, Larne and Belfast.

Ferries sail from Larne Harbour to destinations including Cairnryan and Troon in Scotland, and Fleetwood in England.

The Port of Belfast is Northern Ireland's principal maritime gateway, serving the Northern Ireland economy and increasingly that of the Republic of Ireland. It is a major centre of industry and commerce and has become established as the focus of logistics activity for Northern Ireland. Around two thirds of Northern Ireland's seaborne trade, and a quarter of that for Ireland as a whole, is handled at the port which receives over 9000 vessels each year.

Population

The population of County Antrim is 566,000 (estimate).

Religion

Presbyterianism is the largest religious denomination, followed by Anglicanism.

Administration

The traditional county town is Antrim. More recently, Ballymena was the seat of county government. (The counties of Northern Ireland ceased to be administrative entities in the 1970s, with the reorganization of local government.)

In Northern Ireland the county structure is no longer used in local government. Northern Ireland is split into districts. Those in County Antrim are administered by the following nine councils:

The county contains all of 5 parliamentary constituencies:

Parts of the following constituencies are also in County Antrim:

Settlements

The principal towns are Antrim, Ballymena, Ballymoney, Carrickfergus, Larne and Portrush. Belfast and Lisburn are split between County Antrim and County Down. Ballyclare, Bushmills, Crumlin, Portglenone and Randalstown are among the lesser towns. Belfast and Larne are the chief ports.

See Also:

History

At what date the county of Antrim was formed is not known, but it appears that a certain district bore this name before the reign of Edward II (early 14th century), and when the shiring of Ulster was undertaken by Sir John Perrot in the 16th century, Antrim and Down were already recognized divisions, in contradistinction to the remainder of the province. The earliest known inhabitants were of Celtic origin, and the names of the townlands or subdivisions, supposed to have been made in the 13th century, are all of Gaelic derivation. Antrim was exposed to the inroads of the Danes, and also of the northern Scots, who ultimately effected permanent settlements. In ancient times, it was inhabited by a Celtic people called the Darini. In the early Middle Ages, southern County Antrim was part of the Kingdom of Ulidia, ruled by the Dál Fiatach clans O'Haughey/O'Hoey and MacDonlevy/McDunlavey; the north was part of Dal Riada, which stretched into western Scotland over the Irish Sea. Dal Riada was ruled by the O'Lynch clan, who were vassals of the Ulidians. Besides the Ulidians and Dal Riada, there were the Dal nAraide of lower County Antrim, and the Cruithne, who were not Gaelic Celts but Picts. In the late Middle Ages, it was divided into three parts: northern Clandeboy, the Glynnes and the Route. The Cambro-Norman MacQuillans were powerful in the Route. A branch of the O'Neills of Tyrone migrated to Clandeboy in the 1300s, and ruled it for a time. Their family was called O'Neill Clannaboy. A galloglass sept, the MacDonnells, became the most powerful in the Glynnes in the 1400s.

Antrim is divided into 16 baronies. Lower Antrim, part of Lower Clandeboy, was settled by the sept O'Flynn/O'Lynn. Upper Antrim, part of Lower Clandeboy, was the home of the O'Keevans. Belfast was part of Lower Clandeboy and was held by the O'Neill-Clannaboys. Lower Belfast, Upper Belfast, and Carrickfergus were also part of Lower Clandeboy. Cary was part of the Glynnes; ruled originally by the O'Quinn sept, the MacDonnell galloglasses from Scotland took power here in the late Middle Ages and some of the O'Haras also migrated from Connaught. Upper and Lower Dunluce were part of the Route, and were ruled by the MacQuillans. Upper and Lower Glenarm was ruled by the O'Flynn/O'Lynn sept, considered part of the Glynns. In addition to that sept and that of O'Quinn, both of which were native, the Scottish gallowglass septs of MacKeown, MacAlister, and MacGee, are found there. Kilconway was originally O'Flynn/O'Lynn territory, but was held by the MacQuillans as part of the Route, and later by the gallowglass sept of MacNeill. Lower Massereene was part of Lower Clandeboy and was ruled by the O'Flynns and the O'Heircs. Upper Massereene was part of Lower Clandeboy, ruled by the O'Heircs. Upper and Lower Toome, part of the Route, were O'Flynn/O'Lynn territory. Misc was first ruled by the MacQuillans. Later, the Scottish gallowglass MacDonnells and MacAlisters invaded. The MacDonnells were a branch of the Scottish Clan MacDonald; the MacAlisters traced their origin back to the Irish Colla Uais, eldest of the Three Collas. Islandmagee had, besides antiquarian remains, a notoriety as a home of witchcraft, and was the scene of an act of reprisal against the Catholic population during the Irish Rebellion of 1641 for the massacre of Protestants, by the Scottish Covenanter soldiery of Carrickfergus.

Historic Monuments

Dunluce Castle.

The antiquities of the county consist of cairns, mounts or forts, remains of ecclesiastical and military structures, and round towers. The principal cairns are: one on Colin mountain, near Lisburn; one on Slieve True, near Carrickfergus; and two on Colinward. The cromlechs most worthy of notice are: one near Cairngrainey, to the north-east of the old road from Belfast to Templepatrick; the large cromlech at Mount Druid, near Ballintoy; and one at the northern extremity of Islandmagee. The mounts, forts and entrenchments are very numerous.

There are three round towers: one at Antrim, one at Armoy, and one on Ram Island in Lough Neagh, only that at Antrim being perfect. There are some remains of the ecclesiastic establishments at Bonamargy, where the earls of Antrim are buried, Kells, Glenarm, Glynn, Muckamore and Whiteabbey.

The noble castle of Carrickfergus is the only one in perfect preservation. There are, however, remains of other ancient castles, as Olderfleet, Cam's, Shane's, Glenarm, Garron Tower and Red Bay, but the most interesting of all is Dunluce Castle, remarkable for its great extent and romantic situation.

The UNESCO World Heritage Site, the Giant's Causeway, is in Antrim.

See Also:

  • Castles in County Antrim

Saint Patrick

Slemish, about 8 miles east of Ballymena, is notable as being the scene of St Patrick's early life. According to tradition Saint Patrick was a slave for seven years, near the hill of Slemish, until he escaped back to Great Britain.

Linen

Linen manufacturing was previously an important industry in the County. At the time Ireland produced a large mount of flax. Cotton-spinning by jennies was first introduced by to Belfast by industrialists Robert Joy and Thomas M'Cabe in 1777; an Twenty-three years later it was estimated that more than 27,000 people were employed in the industry within 10 miles of Belfast. Women were employed in the working of patterns on muslin.

Notable residents

Flora and Fauna

Flora

Records of the seaweeds of Co. Antrim were brought together and published in 1907 by J. Adams [3] who notes that the list contains 211 species. Batter's list, of 1902,[4] contained 747 species from the British Isles and Channel Islands.

See Also:

  • People from County Antrim

References


This article uses material from the "County Antrim" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

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