County Cavan: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

County Cavan
Contae an Chabháin
Coat of arms of County Cavan
Motto: Feardhacht is Fírinne  (Irish)
"Manliness and Truth"
Location
Map highlighting County Cavan
Statistics
Province: Ulster
County seat: Cavan
Code: CN
Area: 1,931 km2 (746 sq mi)
Population (2006) 63,961
Website: www.cavancoco.ie

County Cavan (Irish: Contae an Chabháin) is one of the traditional counties of Ireland. It is located within the province of Ulster. It was named after the town of Cavan (Irish: an Cabhán). It is one of three counties situated in the province of Ulster without being part of Northern Ireland. The county is bordered by County Monaghan, County Leitrim, County Longford, County Meath, County Westmeath and County Fermanagh. Area: 1,931 km² (746 square miles). Population (census 2006): 63,961. The county town is Cavan. The county is often referred to as the Breffni County.

Cavan is the 19th largest of Ireland's 32 counties in area and 26th largest in terms of population[1]. It is the sixth largest of Ulster’s 9 counties in size and seventh largest in terms of population.

Lough Oughter, County Cavan

Contents

History

In medieval times, Cavan was known as East Brefnie, or Brefnie O'Reilly after its ruling Gaelic family since it was a major part of the 11th century Irish Kingdom of Breifne, A high degree of defense was achieved by using the natural landscape of sharp hills and loughs. This, and poorly drained soils contributed to the obstacle against invasion.

Historically, Cavan was part of the western province of Connaught, but it officially became a part of Ulster in 1584 when Brefnie was shired and became the county of Cavan. In the south, the Lough Sheelin area was part of Leinster until the late 1300s.

Cavan was hard hit by the Great Famine in the mid-nineteenth century. In the winter of 1847, the local landlord in Mountnugent parish decided to evict over 200 people. The famous ballad "By Lough Sheelin Side" is based on this event witnessed by the local Catholic priest.

Geography

The chief rivers are the Woodford, the Shannon (rising on the south slopes of Cuilcagh mountain; 667 m/2,188 ft), and the Erne, which divides Cavan into two parts: a narrow, mostly low-lying stretch of ground, 30 km/19 mi long, between Leitrim and Fermanagh; and an eastern section of wild and bare hill country.

Much of the county is covered in bog and forest. The soil is generally poor and the climate moist and cold.

The chief lakes, noted for their scenery and coarse fishing, include the tortuously shaped Lough Oughter, and Loughs Ramor, Sheelin, Sillan, and Brackley. In total, there are 365 lakes in County Cavan.[citation needed]

Demographics

The county has a population of 63,961 (2006 preliminary census data),[3] and covers an area of 1,931 km².

The average density of population is 29.9 persons per km².

Cavan is predominantly a rural county, with only 16% of its population living in towns with a population of 1,500 or more.

Towns and villages

Subdivisions

Baronies

  • Castlerahan (Caisleán Raithin)
  • Clankee (Clann Chaoich)
  • Clanmahon (Clann Mhathúna)
  • Loughtee Lower (Lucht Tí Íochtarach)
  • Loughtee Upper (Lucht Tí Uachtarach)
  • Tullygarvey (Teallach Ghairbhíth)
  • Tullyhunco (Teallach Dhúnchadha)
  • Tullyhaw (Teallach Eathach)

Parishes

Townlands

Economy

Agriculture is the chief industry; mushrooms and oats are major crops; dairying and pig- and beef-farming are also important.

Politics

Cavan is divided into Four County Electoral Areas: Bailieborough, Ballyjamesduff, Belturbet and Cavan. There are three Town Councils: Cavan Town, Belturbet and Cootehill.[4]

Famous places

See also

References

  1. ^ Corry, Eoghan (2005). The GAA Book of Lists. Hodder Headline Ireland. pp. 186–191. 
  2. ^ [http://www.cso.ie/census for post 1821 figures, 1653 and 1659 figures from Civil Survey Census of those years, Paper of Mr Hardinge to Royal Irish Academy March 14, 1865, For a discussion on he accuracy of pre-famine census returns see JJ Lee “On the accuracy of the Pre-famine Irish censuses Irish Population, Economy and Society edited by JM Goldstrom and LA Clarkson (1981) p54, in and also New Developments in Irish Population History, 1700-1850 by Joel Mokyr and Cormac O Grada in The Economic History Review, New Series, Vol. 37, No. 4 (Nov., 1984), pp. 473-488. ]
  3. ^ "Census 2006 Preliminary report" (pdf). Stationery Office, Dublin, Ireland. http://www.cso.ie/census/documents/2006PreliminaryReport.pdf. 
  4. ^ "Cavan County Council website". http://www.cavancoco.ie. 

External links


Coordinates: 53°55′N 7°15′W / 53.917°N 7.25°W / 53.917; -7.25

Advertisements

Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

Contents
This article or section does not match our manual of style or needs other editing. Please plunge forward, give it your attention and help it improve!

County Cavan [1] is in Northwest Ireland and Lakelands.

Towns

Urban areas in County Cavan include the county town Cavan:

  • Arva
  • Bailieborough, Ballinagh, Ballyconnell, Ballyhaise, Ballyjamesduff, Bawnboy, Belturbet, Blacklion, Butlersbridge
  • Cootehill
  • Dowra, Glangevlin
  • Kingscourt, Killeshandra, Kilnaleck
  • Mountnugent, Mullagh
  • Redhills
  • Stradone, Shercock
  • Virginia[2] Gateway to the Ireland's Lakeland Region, an atractive small town founded in 1612, situated on the N3 beside Lough Ramor. Several hotels, B&B's, pubs, restaurants and a golf course. Ideal location for weekend breaks with good angling, boating, wildlife and forest walks close by.
  • Car: From Dublin, the N3 will get you to Cavan town in about 1.45h.
  • Bus: From Dublin, Belfast or Donegal.

Get around

You will need a car to get around County Cavan speedily. Besides the hourly busservices to Dublin etc., there is little in the way of public transport.

See

Go see the County museum in Ballyjamesduff and the Cavan Crystal showrooms in Cavan.

  • Virginia Pumpkin Festival [3]. October Bank Holiday weekend

Go fishing/boating on the Erne river. Go explore the Marble Arch Caves.

  • Duggans Pub and Resturant/Olde Post Inn/At Cloverhill.
  • Fortview House B&B, [4] Family run Guesthouse located in the beautiful countryside of Cavan.Fishing,Golf,Horseriding,walking, Geonology,Homecooking,Family walks.
This article is an outline and needs more content. It has a template, but there is not enough information present. Please plunge forward and help it grow!

Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Familypedia

This article requires significantly more historical detail on the particular phases of this location's historical development. The ideal article for a place will give the reader a feel for what it was like to live at that location at the time their relatives were alive there..
Please help to improve this page yourself if you can..
County Cavan
Contae an Chabháin
Location
centerMap highlighting County Cavan
Statistics
Province: Ulster
County Town: Cavan
Code: CN
Area: 1,931 km²
Population (2006) 63,961
Website: www.cavancoco.ie

County Cavan (Contae an Chabháin in Irish) is a county in the Republic of Ireland.

Contents

Location

It is one of three counties situated in the province of Ulster without being part of Northern Ireland. The county is bordered by County Monaghan, County Leitrim, County Longford, County Meath, County Westmeath and County Fermanagh. Area: 1,931 km² (746 square miles). Population (census 2006): 63,961. The county town is Cavan.

Statistics

The county has a population of 63,961 (2006 preliminary census data),[1] and covers an area of 730 km². The average density of population is 29.9 persons per km². Cavan is divided into Four County Electoral Areas: Bailieborough, Ballyjamesduff, Belturbet and Cavan. There are three Town Councils: Cavan Town, Belturbet and Cootehill.[2]

History

Cavan formed the Eastern half of the kingdom of Breifne.

Towns and villages in County Cavan

The township of Cavan, Canada was named after County Cavan, from which its settlers had emigrated.

Famous places

References

  1. ^ Census 2006 Preliminary report (pdf). Stationery Office, Dublin, Ireland.
  2. ^ Cavan County Council website.

External links



This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at County Cavan. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.

This article uses material from the "County Cavan" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message