County Cork: Wikis

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County Cork
Contae Chorcaí
Coat of arms of County Cork
Location
Map highlighting County Cork
Statistics
Province: Munster
County seat: Cork
Code: C
Area: 7,457 km2 (2,879 sq mi) (1st)
Population (2006) 480,909 (including City of Cork);
361,766 (without Cork City)
Website: www.corkcoco.ie

County Cork (Irish: Contae Chorcaí) is one of the traditional counties of Ireland. It is located within the province of Munster, and was named after the city of Cork (Irish: Corcaigh). The southernmost of the Irish counties, it is also the largest, covering an area of just under 7,500 square kilometres. The largest town in County Cork is Cobh, with a population of approximately 28,639

Cork is nicknamed "The Rebel County", as a result of the support of the townsmen of Cork in 1491 for Perkin Warbeck, a pretender to the throne of England during the Wars of the Roses. In more recent times, the name has referred to the prominent role Cork played in the Irish War of Independence (1919–1921) and its position as an anti-treaty stronghold during the Irish Civil War (1922–23). And more recently in the war of independence (1919–1921) it was the scene for most of the fighting.

Contents

History

Much of what is now county Cork was once part of the Kingdom of Deas Mumhan (South Munster), anglicised as "Desmond", ruled by the MacCarthy Mór dynasty. After the Norman Invasion in the 12th century, the McCarthy clan were pushed westward into what is now West Cork and County Kerry. Dunlough Castle, standing just north of Mizen Head, is one of the oldest castles in Ireland (A.D. 1207). The north and east of Cork were taken by the Hiberno-Norman Fitzgerald dynasty, who became the Earls of Desmond. Cork City was given an English Royal Charter in 1318 and for many centuries was an outpost for Old English culture. The Fitzgerald Desmond dynasty was destroyed in the Desmond Rebellions of 1569-1573 and 1579-83. Much of county Cork was devastated in the fighting, particularly in the Second Desmond Rebellion. In the aftermath, much of Cork was colonised by English settlers in the Plantation of Munster.

In 1491 Cork played a part in the English Wars of the Roses when Perkin Warbeck, a pretender to the English throne, landed in the city and tried to recruit support for a plot to overthrow Henry VII of England. The mayor of Cork and several important citizens went with Warbeck to England but when the rebellion collapsed they were all captured and executed. Cork's nickname of the 'rebel city' originates in these events. The nickname was later applied to the whole county.

In 1601 the decisive Battle of Kinsale took place in County Cork, which was to lead to English domination of Ireland for centuries. Kinsale had been the scene of a landing of Spanish troops to help Irish rebels in the Nine Years War (1594–1603). When this force was defeated, the rebel hopes for victory in the war were all but ended. County Cork was officially created by a division of the older County Desmond in 1606.

In the 19th century, Cork was a centre for the Fenians and for the constitutional nationalism of the Irish Parliamentary Party, from 1910 that of the All-for-Ireland Party. The county was a hotbed of guerrilla activity during the Irish War of Independence (1919–1921). Three Cork Brigades of the Irish Republican Army operated in the county and another in the city. Prominent actions included the Kilmichael Ambush in November 1920 and the Crossbarry Ambush in March 1921. The activity of IRA flying columns, such as the one under Tom Barry in west Cork, was popularised in the Ken Loach film The Wind That Shakes The Barley. The centre of Cork city was razed to the ground by the British Black and Tans, in December 1920 as were many other towns and villages around the county.[1]

At this time many Cork residents moved to Liverpool, in England, among them the ancestors of John Lennon and Paul McCartney.

Michael Collins just before his death in 1922

During the Irish Civil War (1922–23), most of the IRA units in Cork sided against the Anglo-Irish Treaty. From July to August 1922 they held the city and county as part of the so called Munster Republic. However, Cork was taken by troops of the Irish Free State in August 1922 in the Irish Free State offensive, that included both overland and seaborne attacks. For the remainder of the war, the county saw sporadic guerrilla fighting until the Anti-Treaty side called a ceasefire and dumped their arms in May 1923. Michael Collins, a key figure in the War of Independence, was born near Clonakilty and assassinated during the civil war in Béal na Bláth, both in West Cork.

Language

County Cork has two Gaeltacht areas where the Irish language is the primary medium of everyday speech. These are Múscraí (English: Muskerry) in the north of the county, especially the village of Cúil Aodha (English: Coolea) and Oileán Chléire (English: Cape Clear Island) an island in the west.

Economy

One of many bays in Co. Cork

The South-West region comprising of counties Cork and Kerry contribute 24,877 billion ($39.3 billion USD)(2005 values; 2008 exchange rate) towards the Irish GDP.[2] The harbour area to the immediate east of the city is home to a large number of pharmaceutical and medical companies.Mahon Point Shopping Centre is Cork and Munster's largest shopping center and has over 75 stores including a retail park.

Tourism

Attractions include the Blarney Stone and Cobh, the port where many Irish emigrants boarded for their voyage to Australia, Canada, New Zealand, South Africa or the United States and also the last stop of the Titanic, before departing on its fated journey.

West Cork is a popular destination for German, French and Dutch tourists, who visit the small villages and islands including Sherkin Island, Oileán Chléire or Cape Clear Island and Dursey Island. Mizen Head, the "southwesternmost point in Ireland" is also in West Cork, as is Sheep's Head. West Cork is noted for its rugged natural beauty, fine beaches and distinct social atmosphere.

In 2010 the Cork and Swansea reopened to allow tourists and visitors to travel from Cork to Swansea. The new Swansea to Cork route will commence with an inaugural sailing from Cork on Monday March 1, 2010, (returning Wednesday March 3).[3]

Media

There are several media publications printed and distributed in County Cork. These include publications from Thomas Crosbie Holdings, most notably the The Irish Examiner (formerly the Cork Examiner) and its sister publication, the Evening Echo. Local and regional newspapers include the Carrigdhoun, The Corkman, the Mallow Star, the Douglas Post, and the Southern Star. Cork's largest free newspaper is the Cork News, which has the highest circulation figures in the area and distributes each Friday to Cork City and County. Radio stations available in the county include: Cork's 96FM and dual-franchise C103 (formerly 103FM County Sound), CRY 104.0FM, Red FM, and Life FM.

Geography

The highest point in County Cork is Knockboy, at 703m. It is on the border with County Kerry and may be accessed from the area known as Priests Leap, near the village of Coomhola.

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Suburbs and towns

Wildlife

County Cork offers habitat to a diversity of flora and fauna. The Hooded Crow, corvus cornix is a common bird, particularly in areas nearer the coast. Due to this bird's ability to (rarely) prey upon small lambs, the gun clubs of Cork County have killed a large number of these birds in modern times.[10]

A collection of the marine algae is housed in the Herbarium of the botany department of the University College Cork.[11]

Parts of the South West coastline are a hotspots for sightings of rare birds, with Cape Clear being a prime location for bird watching, the Island is also home to one of only a few Ganet colonies around Ireland and the UK.

A major attraction to the coastline of Cork is whale watching with sightings of fin whales, basking sharks, pilot whales, minke whales, and other species being frequent.

Septs and families of Cork

Cork was a stronghold for many powerful septs and families of Munster, most of them of Eóganachta or Dáirine (Corcu Loígde) lineage. Common Cork surnames are , Ahern, Buckley, Coffey, Collins, Condon, Cotter, Crehan, Cronin, Crowley, Daly/Daley, Dineen/Dinneen, Evans, Flynn, Foley, Golden, Gould, Healey, Healy, Heaphy, Hegarty, Hennessy, Horgan, Hurley, Kennedy, Kelly, Kelleher, Lee, Long, Lyons, MacCarthy, McAuliffe, Murphy, Noonan, O'Callaghan, O'Connell, O'Cronin, O'Connor, O'Donovan, O'Driscoll, O'Keeffe, O'Leary, O'Mahony, O'Regan, O'Riordan, O'Rourke, O'Sullivan, Sheehan and Twomey. Some prevalent Norman-Irish names are Barrett, Barry, Fitzgerald, Griffin, Hyde, Oliver, Walsh, and White.

Location grid

County Anthem

The song "The banks of my own lovely lee" is the song traditionally associated with the county. It is often heard at GAA fixtures involving the county, as well as at soccer matches.[12]

See also

References

  1. ^ rebelcork.com
  2. ^ Cork / Kerry GDPPDF (309 KB)
  3. ^ "Cork to Swansea Ferry". Fastnet Line. 2010-02-16. http://www.fastnetline.com. 
  4. ^ For 1653 and 1659 figures from Civil Survey Census of those years, Paper of Mr Hardinge to Royal Irish Academy March 14, 1865.
  5. ^ Census for post 1821 figures.
  6. ^ http://www.histpop.org
  7. ^ http://www.nisranew.nisra.gov.uk/census
  8. ^ Lee, JJ (1981). "On the accuracy of the Pre-famine Irish censuses". in Goldstrom, J. M.; Clarkson, L. A.. Irish Population, Economy, and Society: Essays in Honour of the Late K. H. Connell. Oxford, England: Clarendon Press. 
  9. ^ Mokyr, Joel; O Grada, Cormac (November), "New Developments in Irish Population History, 1700-1850", The Economic History Review Volume 37 (Issue 4): 473–488, doi:10.1111/j.1468-0289.1984.tb00344.x, http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/120035880/abstract 
  10. ^ C. Michael Hogan. 2009. Hooded Crow: Corvus cornix, GlobalTwitcher.com, ed, N. Stromberg
  11. ^ Cullinane, J.P. 1973 Phycology of the South Coast of Ireland. University College Cork
  12. ^ http://www.corkindependent.com/local-news/local-news/lord-mayor-to-promote-cork-songs-at-schools/

External links

Coordinates: 51°58′N 8°35′W / 51.967°N 8.583°W / 51.967; -8.583


Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

County Cork, in Southwest Ireland is the largest county in the Republic of Ireland and also the location of the country's second largest city. This means that its inhabitants have a reasonable sense of their status. It also has a very large coastline and many items of interest for the visitor.

  • North Cork is a renowned destination for anglers, with several long rivers - notably the Blackwater, providing plentiful fish in a beautiful setting. This part of the county is the least touristed.
Kitchen garden, Ballymaloe
Kitchen garden, Ballymaloe
  • East Cork is known for the quality of it's agricultural produce, the cookery school at Ballymaloe near Cloyne (the Enlightenment philosopher Bishop Berkeley lived in Cloyne) and the pretty seaside village of Ballycotton.
  • West Cork is more touristed, and it's easy to understand why - the southernmost coast of Ireland stretches for over 100km from Cork Harbour through verdant farmland, to three peninsulas jutting out into the Atlantic. It may not quite have some of the drama of Kerry or Donegal, but the little villages and coves and rocky islands are surely some of the prettiest places in Ireland, or anywhere else. When the weather is bad it can be spectacular, or you can retire to the local pub for a Murphy's or a Guinness. When the weather is good, there are few better places to be.
  • Cork Southern transport hub and commercial, administrative and cultural centre for the county and the South of Ireland.
  • Blarney Famed for the stone and it's verdant setting.
  • Kinsale Historic town associated with sailing and good food.
  • Youghal Known for its long beach and as the former home of Walter Raleigh.
  • Cobh Last port of call for hundreds of thousands of emigrants, as well as for the Titanic.
  • Mallow North Cork's largest town, with Cork's only horse-racing course.
  • Clonakilty West Cork's most vibrant town.
  • Skibbereen Gateway to Castletownsend, Baltimore, Schull and the Mizen.
  • Bantry Of the beautiful eponymous bay.
  • Macroom Main town of the mid-Cork/Lee valley region, gateway to Cork's gaeltacht (Irish-speaking area).
  • Glengarriff Relaxed and scenic, on Bantry bay.
  • Midleton Home of Irish whiskey.
  • Crosshaven Home of the world's oldest yacht club.
  • Cork Harbour is one of the finest natural harbours in the world and this is reflected in Cork city's motto - Statio bene fide carinis (a safe place for ships). The city encroaches on the western side of the upper harbour, which also stretches to Midleton in the East and includes Fota Island and Arboretum. Cobh lies in the centre of the harbour. This was the last port of call for the Titanic and was the port through which more Irish people emigrated to America than any other. The lower harbour contains the village of Crosshaven which has the world's oldest yacht club and hosts a week long festival of sailing every year. Much of the harbour area is taken up with residential and industrial areas, but there are also forests and beauty-spots. Some of the world's best-known cruise ships visit occasionally.

Understand

County Cork had a population of 480,000 in the 2006 census, but it's increasing quickly at the moment so it's likely to have over half a million by now. Up to 400,000 are considered to be in the Greater Cork area - within about 20 miles (30 km) of the centre. The more distant parts of the county are sparsely populated. The harbour has a long maritime history and the area is part residential, part industrial. The farmland of the county is very productive and is a mixture of dairy towards the North, arable towards the East and sheep towards the West, with considerable overlap. Fishing is important all along the coast. Manufacturing tends to be centred in and around the city, while Artists and Artisans and small businesses can be found throughout the city and county.

Talk

There is definitely no shortage of chatting in County Cork. Try to concentrate and you will pick up most of English spoken word here.

Get in

By air

The Airport is situated 4 miles (6 km) south of the city centre. Several airlines provide scheduled flights to many cities in the UK and Europe. A regular bus service operates between the airport and the city.

By bus

Eurolines also operate an overnight bus service from London to Cork, via Rosslare.

By boat

The port of Ringaskiddy is 7 miles (11 km) to the southeast of the city, on the harbour, and ferries take passengers to Swansea in Wales (new service operated by Fastnet Line resuming in Late May/Early June 2009) and to Roscoff in Brittany. A bus service operates between the port of Ringaskiddy and the city.

Get around

By bus

Bus Eireann [1] run dozens of services from Cork City bus station to all of the towns in the county and throughout Ireland. Direct services between the major towns and cities in Ireland will run several times daily and can be a very cost effective way of travelling around Ireland.

By train

Trains run from Kent station to Mallow, Charleville and Northwest parts of the County (on their way to Dublin and Tralee) and a commuter service runs to Fota Island [2] and Cobh. It is possible to reach most major towns in Ireland by train, but many will require a change of train during the journey. Irish Rail [3] run the rail network

By taxi

Metered taxis are available almost everywhere and non-metered hackney cabs also (try to find out the price of a journey beforehand). In general, taxis are not cheap in Ireland and can quickly become an expensive luxury while visiting Ireland.

By bicycle

Bicycling is very pleasant on the quieter roads and there is a nascent network of bicycle lanes in the city.

By car hire

Car hire is available from several agencies in the city and at the airport. The following car rental companies are listed as having a location at Cork Airport [4]:

  • Avis - Telephone +353 21 4327460
  • Budget Car Rental Ireland - Telephone +353 21 4314000
  • Hertz [5] - Telephone +353 21 4965849
  • Irish Car Rentals.com - Telephone +353 21 4318644
  • Alamo / National - Telephone +353 21 4318623
  • Dan Dooley - Telephone +353 21 4321099
  • Enterprise Rent a Car - Telephone +353 21 4327031
  • Europcar - Telephone +353 21 4917300
  • Thrifty Car Rental Ireland [6] - Telephone +353 21 4977884
  • In Cork city, St Finbar's cathedral is an obvious architectural highpoint. A walk through the campus of University College Cork is well worth while. The Glucksman gallery, Crawford gallery and Triskel arts centre are the most important Artistic venues in the city. The English market is probably the best food market in either Ireland or Britain. Other obvious attractions are Cork city gaol, St Anne's church in Shandon and the Cork public museum. The city centre is very amenable to walking - there are over 30 bridges across the two channels of the river, and while few of the buildings from prior to the nineteenth century survive, the street layout is interesting and the Architecture can be also.
  • A visit to Blarney Castle would allow you to bend over backwards and kiss the stone of eloquence. This might give you a good chance of being able to better maintain conversations with the inhabitants of the county.
  • Midleton distillery[www.jamesonwhiskey.com/omd/] is where most of the world-famous brands of Irish whiskey are currently produced - Jameson, Powers and Paddy, as well as others. The historic buildings house a museum. And a tasting centre.
  • Bantry house and gardens on the shores of Bantry bay is a glorious example of Georgian architecture in a stunning location.
  • Fota wildlife park and Arboretum in the upper harbour is a forested micro-climate where many endangered species from around the world are bred and protected. It is notable for it's success in breeding cheetahs.
  • The town of Kinsale boasts two seventeenth century star forts on either side of the harbour. James' fort is overgrown and mysterious, while Charles' fort is probably the finest example of a military fortress in Ireland.

Itineraries

You could base an itinerary on any of several activities, including:

  • Fishing - Inland river-angling and Oceanic shark-fishing would cover this. There are several places to do both.
  • Horseriding - Many horseriding facilities are available throughout the county.
  • Golfing - A good variety of courses are available, topped by the magnificent (if pricey) Old Head of Kinsale course.
  • Diving - Mostly offshore, but there is Lake diving at Lough Ine near Skibbereen.
  • Surfing - It can get rough. Popular spots include Garretstown near Kinsale, Castlefreke near Clonakilty and Barleycove on the Mizen peninsula.
  • Sailing - Visit Crosshaven, home to Royal Cork Yacht Club. Holidays and lessons with SailCork at East Ferry in Cobh.
  • Try to get off the beaten track and have some unique experiences. Head West. West is best.
  • Try the seafood. And try washing it down with some Murphy's or Beamish.
  • Try to learn a few words of Irish every now and again. (Dia dhuit a chara - Hello friend).
  • Visit Crosshaven every 2 years for the Bi-annual Cork Week sailing regatta at the world's oldest Yacht club or come to East Ferry in Cobh for lessons in sailing or powerboating with SailCork
  • SailCork, East Ferry Cobh, +353214811237, [7]. Have fun learning sailing, powerboating and navigation. Enjoyable courses for adults and juniors under the guidance of Eddie English and his team of professional instructors.  edit

Eat

Cork has a good reputation for food. Beef, Lamb, Bacon and poultry are raised to a very high standard. The dairy produce is as good as any in the world. The sea is full of fish and shellfish. These products are served up in both traditional and innovative ways throughout the county, and are complemented by dozens of ethnic restaurants cooking food from all over the world. There are over 500 restaurants in the yellow pages and many are world class. Some examples are:

  • The Ambassador, Cook St, Cork - One of the finest Chinese restaurants around.
  • Cafe Paradiso, Lancaster Quay, Cork - One of the best vegetarian restaurants anywhere.
  • Quay Coop, Sullivan's Quay, Cork - Top quality vegetarian wholefoods, especially good lunches.
  • Wylam, Victoria Cross, Cork - Excellent Chinese food.
  • Gingerbread House, Paul St, Cork - Large daytime cafe with large selection of cakes.
  • Bully's, Paul St, Cork - Possibly the best pizza in Cork.
  • Bracken Cafe, Paul St, Cork - Nicest scones in the city.
  • Jim Edwards, Short Quay, Kinsale - Quality, reasonably-priced restaurant.
  • Fishy Fishy Cafe, Guardwell, Kinsale - Top class fish dishes.
  • Ballymaloe House, Shanagarry, Midleton - Top-quality, wholesome Irish food (as seen on TV, regularly).
  • Blair's Cove, Durrus, Bantry - Gorgeous food, gorgeous location.
  • Rivers End, Crosshaven, - cafe style snack bar

Drink

Irish pubs are an important part of Irish life and Cork has lots of them. There is at least one in every little village, and sometimes they don't even need a village, they're just there. Cork city has a selection worthy of the second city, and they tend to be more intimate and friendly than those you might find in bigger cities. Do try Murphy's and Beamish at least once each. Some good pubs are:

Stay safe

For emergency assistance (Gardai (Police), Ambulance or Fire-brigade), phone 112 or 999.

Get out

Cork city has several multi-screen 'Multiplex' cinemas in the centre and suburbs which show popular movies. There are similar cinemas in Clonakilty, Midleton and Mallow. For more alternative and international movies, try the Kino Arthouse cinema on Washington St in Cork, or occasionally, the Triskel Arts Centre on Tobin St, Cork.

There are several Theatres in Cork city, providing a wide variety of stage-based entertainment. The Cork Opera House on Emmet Place is the largest, and among the others are the Everyman Palace on MacCurtain St, the intimate Granary Theatre on Mardyke Parade and the Triskel Arts Centre on Tobin St.

There are usually a couple of dozen clubs running in the city at weekends, perhaps a dozen during the week. Ask around or check out the flyers in pubs to see if there is something you like on - there probably will be.

Most of the towns in the county have a club or two at weekends. These tend to try to please as many people as possible and serve the purpose of providing late night alcohol, rather than cutting-edge music. But you never know.

(If you must leave the county, the nearest places are Kerry, Waterford, Limerick and Tipperary ;-)

This is a usable article. It has information for getting in as well as some complete entries for restaurants and hotels. An adventurous person could use this article, but please plunge forward and help it grow!

Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Familypedia

This article requires significantly more historical detail on the particular phases of this location's historical development. The ideal article for a place will give the reader a feel for what it was like to live at that location at the time their relatives were alive there..
Please help to improve this page yourself if you can..
County Cork
Contae Chorcaí
Coat of arms of County Cork
Location
centerMap highlighting County Cork
Statistics
Province: Munster
County Town: Cork
Code: C (CK proposed)
Area: 7,457 km²
2,879 mi²
Population (2006) 480,909 (including City of Cork);
361,766 (without Cork City)
Website: www.corkcoco.ie


County Cork (Irish: Contae Chorcaí ) is the most southwesterly and the largest of the modern counties of Ireland. Cork is nicknamed "The Rebel County", as a result of the support of the townsmen of Cork in 1491 for Perkin Warbeck, a pretender to the throne of England during the Wars of the Roses. In more recent times, the name has referred to the prominent role Cork played in the Irish War of Independence (1919-1921) and its position as an anti-treaty stronghold during the Irish Civil War (1922-23). Attractions include the Blarney Stone and Cobh (formerly Queenstown), the port where many Irish emigrants boarded for their voyage to the United States, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, or South Africa and also the last stop of the Titanic, before departing on its doomed journey. The city of Cork is the second largest city in the Republic of Ireland and capital of the province of Munster.[1]

The remote western area of the county, known as West Cork, is a popular destination for tourists, who visit the small villages and islands including Sherkin Island, Oileán Chléire or Cape Clear Island and Dursey Island. Mizen Head, the "southwesternmost point in Ireland" is also in West Cork, as is Sheep's Head.

In recent years land in the far west of the county has become in high demand internationally, and large numbers of EU citizens have settled in the area, along with celebrities such as Jeremy Irons. West Cork is noted for its rugged natural beauty, fine beaches and distinct social atmosphere.

Contents

Septs and Families of Cork

Cork was a stronghold for many powerful septs and families of Munster, most of them of Eoghanacht lineage. Common Cork surnames are Ahern, Buckley, Collins, Cody, Cronin, Crowley, Flynn, Foley, Gould, Horgan, Lee, McCarthy, Murphy, Noonan, O'Callaghan, O'Cronin, O'Connor, O'Donovan, O'Driscoll, O'Keeffe, O'Leary, O'Mahony, O'Rourke, O'Sullivan, Sheehan and Toomey. Some prevalent Norman-Irish names are Barrett, Barry, Fitzgerald, Walsh and White

History

Main article: History of Cork

Much of what is now county Cork was once part of the Kingdom of Deis Muin (South Munster), anglicised as "Desmond", ruled by the MacCarthy Mor dynasty. After the Norman Invasion in the 12th century, the McCarty clan were pushed westward into what is now West Cork and County Kerry. The north and east of Cork were taken by the Hiberno-Norman Fitzgerald dynasty, who became the Earl of Desmond. Cork City was given an English Royal Charter in 1318 and for many centuries was an outpost for Old English culture. The Fitzgerald Desmond dynasty was destroyed in the Desmond Rebellions of 1569-1573 and 1579-83. Much of county Cork was devastated in the fighting, particularly in the Second Desmond Rebellion. In the aftermath, much of Cork was colonised by English settlers in the Plantation of Munster.

In 1491 Cork played a part in the English Wars of the Roses when Perkin Warbeck, a pretender to the English throne, landed in the city and tried to recruit support for a plot to overthrow Henry VII of England. The mayor of Cork and several important citizens went with Warbeck to England but when the rebellion collapsed they were all captured and executed. Cork's nickname of the 'rebel city' originates in these events. The nickname was later applied to the whole county.

In 1601 the decisive Battle of Kinsale took place in County Cork, which was to lead to English domination of Ireland for centuries. Kinsale had been the scene of a landing of Spanish troops to help Irish rebels in the Nine Years War (1594-1603). When this force was defeated, the rebel hopes for victory in the war were all but ended. County Cork was officially created by a division of the older County Desmond in 1606.

In the 19th century, Cork was a centre for the Fenians and for the constitutional nationalism of the Irish Parliamentary Party. The county was a hotbed of guerrilla activity during the Irish War of Independence 1919-1921. Three Cork Brigades of the Irish Republican Army operated in the county and another in the city. Prominent actions included the Kilmichael Ambush in November 1920 and the Crossbarry Ambush in March 1921. The activity of IRA flying columns, such as the one under Tom Barry in west Cork, was recently popularised in the Ken Loach film The Wind That Shakes The Barley. The centre of Cork city was razed to the ground by the British Black and Tans, in December 1920 as were many other towns and villages around the county.[2]

During the Irish Civil War (1922-23), most of the IRA units in Cork sided against the Anglo-Irish Treaty. From July to August 1922 they held the city and county as part of the so called Munster Republic. However, Cork was taken by troops of the Irish Free State in August 1922 in the Irish Free State offensive, that included both overland and seaborne attacks. For the remainder of the war, the county saw sporadic guerrilla fighting until the Anti-Treaty side called a ceasefire and dumped their arms in May 1923. Michael Collins, a key figure in the War of Independence, was born near Clonakilty and assassinated during the civil war in Béal na Bláth, both in West Cork.

Language

County Cork has two Gaeltacht areas where the Irish language is the primary medium of everyday speech. These are Múscraí (English: Muskerry ) in the north of the county, especially the village of Cúil Aodha (English: Coolea ) and Oileán Chléire (English: Cape Clear ) an island in the west.

Economy

One of many bays in Co. Cork

The South-West region comprising of counties Cork and Kerry contribute 22.298 billion (2002 values) towards the Irish GDP. The harbour area to the immediate east of the city is home to a large number of pharmaceutical and medical companies.

Wildlife

A collection of the marine algae is housed in the Herbarium of the botany department of the University College Cork. [3]

References

  1. ^ http://www.sun.com/customers/storage/cork.xml
  2. ^ rebelcork.com
  3. ^ Cullinane, J.P. 1973 Phycology of the South Coast of Ireland. University College Cork

External links


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at County Cork. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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This article uses material from the "County Cork" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

Simple English

County Cork is the largest county in Ireland in terms of size. Almost half a million people live in County cork. The leader of the Irish War of Independence, Michael Collins, was born in the town of Clonakilty in County Cork. He was murdered in Béal na mBláth in west Cork. West Cork is known for its beautiful scenery.

The main towns in County Cork are Cork City, Youghal, Mallow , Bandon, Clonakilty, Kinsale, Blarney and Cobh. It is nicknamed "The Rebel County".

Parts of the Gaeltacht are in the county.

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