County Londonderry: Wikis

  
  
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

County Londonderry / County Derry
Contae Dhoire
Coat of arms of County Londonderry / County Derry
Motto: Auxilium A Domino  (Latin)
"Help comes from the Lord"
Location
Map highlighting County Londonderry / County Derry
Statistics
Province: Ulster
County seat: Coleraine
Area: 2,074 km2 (801 sq mi)
Population (2001) 233,500[1]

County Londonderry or County Derry is one of the traditional counties of Ireland. It is located within the province of Ulster and is part of Northern Ireland. It was named after its main town, Derry (from the Irish: Daire meaning "oak wood"[2][3]), which lies in the north-western corner of the county. Since 1981 it has become one of four counties in Northern Ireland that has a Catholic majority (55.56% according to the 2001 Census[4]), with 57% of the Catholic population residing within Derry City Borough.[4].

The highest point in the county is the summit of Sawel Mountain (678m) on the border with County Tyrone. Sawel is part of the Sperrin Mountains, which dominate the southern part of the county. To the east and west, the land falls into the valleys of the Bann and Foyle rivers respectively; in the south-east, the county touches the shore of Lough Neagh, which is the largest lake in Ireland; the north of the county is distinguished by the steep cliffs, dune systems and remarkable beaches of the Atlantic coast.

The county is home to a number of important buildings and landscapes, including the well-preserved 17th-century city walls of Derry; the National Trust-owned Plantation estate at Springhill; the Mussenden Temple with its spectacular views of the Atlantic; the dikes, artificial coastlines and the noted bird sanctuaries on the eastern shore of Lough Foyle; and the visitor centre at Bellaghy Bawn, close to the childhood home of Nobel laureate Seamus Heaney. In the centre of the county are the old-growth deciduous forests at Banagher and Ness Wood, where the Burntollet River flows over the highest waterfalls in Northern Ireland.

The county flower is the Purple Saxifrage.[5] The term Oak Leaf County is the county nickname particularly in relation to the county's teams in Gaelic Athletic Association competitions.

Contents

Name

As with the city, its name is subject to the Derry/Londonderry name dispute, with the form Derry preferred by nationalists and Londonderry preferred by unionists.[12][13][14][15][16][17][18][19][20][21] The name Derry is used in the Republic of Ireland, while most of the British authorities prefer to use the name Londonderry.

History

Unlike the town, governmentally there was not a preceding administrative area called County Londonderry: it was established in 1613 by the government combining the former County of Coleraine, the Barony of Loughinsholin (which comprised the north of Country Tyrone) and small parts of Counties Antrim, Donegal[22] at the behest of the London Livery Companies and the Irish Society (hence, London-Derry) so that they could control both banks of the mouths of the River Foyle and the River Bann and have access to sufficient wood for construction.

Administratively, the city became a separate county borough, so from the establishment of Londonderry County Council in 1899 until its abolition in 1973, the town of Coleraine was the official county town of County Londonderry with the county council's headquarters.

Administration

Since 1973, administration has been divided between district councils. The councils covering the county are Derry City Council, Limavady Borough Council, and Magherafelt District Council; and most of Coleraine Borough Council, which is partly in County Antrim; and part of Cookstown District Council, which is largely in County Tyrone.

Map of County Londonderry, 1837.

Settlements

Cities

(population of 75,000 or more with a cathedral)

Large towns

(population of 18,000 or more and under 75,000 at 2001 Census)[23]

Medium towns

(population of 10,000 or more and under 18,000 at 2001 Census)[23]

Small towns

(population of 4,500 or more and under 10,000 at 2001 Census)[23]

Intermediate settlements

(population of 2,250 or more and under 4,500 at 2001 Census)[23]

Villages

(population of 1,000 or more and under 2,250 at 2001 Census)[23]

Small villages or hamlets

(population of less than 1,000 at 2001 Census)[23]

Subdivisons

Baronies

  • Coleraine (from the Irish: Cúil Raithin meaning "ferny corner")
  • Keenaght (from the Irish: Cianachta meaning "Clan Cain")
  • North-East Liberties of Coleraine
  • North-West Liberties of Londonderry
  • Loughinsholin (from the Irish: Loch Inis Uí Fhloinn meaning "lough of the island of O'Lynn")
  • Tirkeeran (from the Irish: Tír Mhic Caoirthinn meaning "Cartin's land")

Parishes

Townlands

Education

Government-funded education up to secondary school level is administered by

For Catholic grant-maintained schools administration is by the Derry Diocesan Education Office.

Two major centres of the University of Ulster are in the county, including its headquarters at Coleraine and the Magee Campus in Derry.

Sport

In Gaelic games, the county teams wear the colours red and white. There are many club teams competing in up to five leagues and three championships. The county team has won one All-Ireland Senior Football Championship (in 1993) and five National League titles. Hurling is also widely played but is not as popular as football.[citation needed] However, the county team is generally regarded as one of the top hurling sides in Ulster[citation needed] and in 2006 won the Nicky Rackard Cup - the third tier hurling competition in Ireland.

In association football, County Londonderry is represented in the IFA Premiership by Coleraine F.C. and Institute F.C. Coleraine are one of the most successful provincial sides in the country.[citation needed] Limavady United F.C., Moyola Park F.C., Portstewart F.C. and Tobermore United F.C. compete in the IFA Championship. Derry City F.C. play in the Premier Division of the League of Ireland after leaving the Northern Ireland structures in 1985, having resigned from the Irish Football League at the height of the Troubles because of not being allowed play their home games at the Brandywell due to security concerns from other clubs.

The Northern Ireland Milk Cup was established in 1983 and is regarded as one of the most prestigious youth football tournaments in Europe and the world.[24][25][26][27] The competition is based at Coleraine, County Londonderry and several surrounding towns - Ballymoney, Limavady, Portstewart, Portrush, Castlerock, Ballymena and Broughshane. The event, held in the last week of July, has attracted teams from 56 countries around the world including Europe, the USA, Africa, the Far East, South America, the Middle East, Australia, Russia, New Zealand and Canada. Some of the biggest teams in the world have entered including Premiership giants Everton F.C, Liverpool, Manchester United, Chelsea, Tottenham Hotspur as well as top European teams such as Feyenoord, FC Porto, FC Barcelona, Benfica, Bayern Munich and Dynamo Kiev.

In rugby union, the county is represented at senior level by Rainey Old Boys Rugby Club, Magherafelt who compete in the Ulster Senior League and All Ireland Division Three. Limavady R.F.C, City of Derry Rugby Club, Londonderry Y.M.C.A and Coleraine Rugby Club all compete in Ulster Qualifying League One.

Cricket is particularly popular in the north-west of Ireland, with eleven of the twenty senior clubs in the North West Cricket Union located in County Londonderry: Limavady, Eglinton, Glendermott, Brigade, Killymallaght, Ardmore, Coleraine, Bonds Glen, Drummond, Creevedonnell and The Nedd.

In rowing, Richard Archibald from Coleraine along with his Irish team-mates qualified for the Beijing 2008 Olympics by finishing second in the lightweight fours final in Poznan, thus qualifying for the Beijing 2008 Olympics. Another Coleraine rower Alan Campbell is a World Cup gold medallist in the single sculls in 2006.

Media

The county currently has four main radio stations

See also

References

  1. ^ Key Statistics Tables 2001 Census combined for Coleraine, Derry, Limavady & Magherfelt.
  2. ^ http://www.libraryireland.com/IrishPictures/IX-Derry-History.php)
  3. ^ http://books.google.com/books?id=kVslRbrSH7QC&pg=PA123&dq=daire+origin+of+Derry
  4. ^ a b 2001 Census Statistics
  5. ^ County flowers in Britain www.plantlife.org.uk
  6. ^ For 1653 and 1659 figures from Civil Survey Census of those years, Paper of Mr Hardinge to Royal Irish Academy March 14, 1865.
  7. ^ Census for post 1821 figures.
  8. ^ http://www.histpop.org
  9. ^ http://www.nisranew.nisra.gov.uk/census
  10. ^ Lee, JJ (1981). "On the accuracy of the Pre-famine Irish censuses". in Goldstrom, J. M.; Clarkson, L. A.. Irish Population, Economy, and Society: Essays in Honour of the Late K. H. Connell. Oxford, England: Clarendon Press. 
  11. ^ Mokyr, Joel; O Grada, Cormac (November), "New Developments in Irish Population History, 1700-1850", The Economic History Review Volume 37 (Issue 4): 473–488, doi:10.1111/j.1468-0289.1984.tb00344.x, http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/120035880/abstract 
  12. ^ Protest at Derry name switch, The Times, January 25, 1984
  13. ^ Centre for European Policy Studies, accessed October 6, 2007
  14. ^ High Court may decide on Derry name change, The Times, May 8, 1984
  15. ^ "The Walled City Experience". Northern Ireland Tourist Board. http://www.discovernorthernireland.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=1588. Retrieved 2008-09-04. 
  16. ^ BBC News: Court to Rule on City Name April 7, 2006
  17. ^ City name row lands in High Court BBC News
  18. ^ Court begins Derry name change hearing BreakingNews.ie
  19. ^ Judge to decide Derry name issue RTE News
  20. ^ Judgement of Mr Justice Weatherup
  21. ^ Derry City Council: Re Application for Judicial Review
  22. ^ Curl, James Stevens (2001). "The City of London and the Plantation of Ulster". BBCi History Online. http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/plantation/companies/londoncompanies_full.rtf. Retrieved 2008-08-10. 
  23. ^ a b c d e f "Statistical classification of settlements". NI Neighbourhood Information Service. http://www.ninis.nisra.gov.uk/mapxtreme_towns/statistical%20classification.htm. Retrieved 23 February 2009. 
  24. ^ Newsletter.co.uk
  25. ^ [1] NI Milk Cup Official Site
  26. ^ [2] Manchester United Official Website
  27. ^ University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC)

External links


Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

Contents

County Londonderry or County Derry is located in Northern Ireland. The name of the county is a point of political dispute, with unionists advocating the longer name, and nationalists advocating the shorter. A common attempt at compromise is to refer to the county as "Londonderry" and the city as "Derry", but this is not universally accepted.

Map of County Londonderry
Map of County Londonderry

Eat

Timberquay Restaurant & Wine Bar, Strand Road: A new vibrant dining experience located on the banks of the River Foyle www.timberquay.com.

  • Restaurants in Derry, - Quality Restaurants throughout the Historic Walled City:Derry Restaurants
  • Bars in Derry, - Directory listing of some of Derry's finest watering holes:Bars in Derry

Stay

BT48 Apartotel - 5 Star Self Catering Accommodation, luxury 1-3 bedroom apartments on the banks of the River Foyle:www.derrycityaparthotel.com

  • Derry Accommodation, - Hotel, self catering and b&B accommodation throughout the Historic Walled City:www.derryaccommodation.com

Get out

This article is an outline and needs more content. It has a template, but there is not enough information present. Please plunge forward and help it grow!

Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Familypedia

This article requires significantly more historical detail on the particular phases of this location's historical development. The ideal article for a place will give the reader a feel for what it was like to live at that location at the time their relatives were alive there..
Please help to improve this page yourself if you can..
County Londonderry / County Derry
Contae Dhoire
Coontie Lunnonderrie[1] / Coontie Derrie
Coat of arms of County Londonderry / County Derry
Location
centerMap highlighting County Londonderry / County Derry
Statistics
Province: Ulster
County Town: Derry
Area: 2,074 km²
Population (est.) 213,000


County Londonderry or County Derry (Irish: Contae Dhoire) is one of the six counties of Northern Ireland in the province of Ulster in Ireland. It was named after its main town – and later city and administrative centre – Derry (Londonderry), which lies in the north-western corner of the county.

The highest point in the county is the summit of Sawel Mountain (678m) on the border with County Tyrone. Sawel is part of the Sperrin Mountains, which dominate the southern part of the county. To the east and west, the land falls into the valleys of the Bann and Foyle rivers respectively; the north of the county is distinguished by the steep cliffs, dune systems and remarkable beaches of the Atlantic coast.

The county is home to a number of important buildings and landscapes: these include the excellently preserved seventeenth-century city walls of Derry; the fine National Trust Plantation house and estate at Springhill; the Mussenden Temple with its spectacular views of the Atlantic; the dykes, artificial coastlines and internationally important bird sanctuaries on the eastern shore of Lough Foyle; and the visitor centre at Bellaghy Bawn, close to the childhood home of Nobel laureate Seamus Heaney.

The county flower is the Purple Saxifrage.[2]

Contents

Name

As with the town, its name is subject to the Derry/Londonderry name dispute, with the form Derry preferred by nationalists and Londonderry preferred by unionists. The name Derry is usually used in the Republic of Ireland, it also has a mixed usage in Northern Ireland, depending on the source; while most of the British authorities prefer to use the name Londonderry.

History

Unlike the town, historically there was not a preceding County Derry: it was established in 1613 by combining the former County of Coleraine with small parts of Counties Antrim, Donegal, and Tyrone at the behest of the London livery companies and the Irish Society (hence, London-Derry) so that they could control both banks of the mouths of the River Foyle and the River Bann and have access to sufficient wood for construction.

Administration

Since 1973, administration has been divided between district councils. The councils covering the county are Coleraine Borough Council, Derry City Council, Limavady Borough Council, and Magherafelt District Council; and part of Cookstown District Council, which is largely in County Tyrone.

Map of County Londonderry, 1837.

Education

Government-funded education up to secondary school level is administered by

For Catholic grant-maintained schools administration is by the Derry Diocesan Education Office.

Two major centres of the University of Ulster are in the county, including its headquarters at Coleraine and the Magee Campus in Derry.

Sport

In the Gaelic Athletic Association, the Derry county teams wear the colours red and white. There are many club teams competing in up to five leagues and three championships.

In Association Football, County Londonderry/Derry is represented in the Irish Premier League by Limavady United, Institute F.C. and Coleraine F.C.. Tobermore United and Moyola Park compete in Division One. Derry City F.C. play in the top division in the Eircom Ireland league.

In Rugby union, the county is represented at senior level by City of Derry Rugby Club and Rainey Old Boys Rugby Club. Limavady R.F.C, Londonderry Y.M.C.A and Coleraine Rugby Club compete in the qualifying leagues.

Media

C9TV broadcasts to much of the north and east of the county and is based in Derry.

The county currently has four main radio stations

  • BBC Radio Foyle
  • Q102.9
  • Q97.2
  • Six FM (in the south of the county)
  • Highland Radio, a station based in Letterkenny, County Donegal. It has a huge listenership in Derry City and West Tyrone.

See also

References



This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at County Londonderry. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.

This article uses material from the "County Londonderry" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.







Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message