County Monaghan: Wikis

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Coordinates: 54°14′37″N 7°02′22″W / 54.243563°N 7.039490°W / 54.243563; -7.039490

County Monaghan
Contae Mhuineacháin
Motto: Dúthracht agus Dícheall  (Irish)
"Diligence and Best Endeavour"
Location
Map highlighting County Monaghan
Statistics
Province: Ulster
County seat: Monaghan
Code: MN
Area: 1,294 km2 (500 sq mi)
Population (2006[1]) 55,816
Website: www.monaghan.ie

County Monaghan (pronounced /ˈmɒnəhən/Irish: Contae Mhuineacháin) is one of the traditional counties of Ireland. It is located within the Province of Ulster and is part of the Republic of Ireland. It was named after the town of Monaghan (Irish: Muineachán).

Monaghan is the sixth smallest of Ireland’s 32 counties in area and fourth smallest in terms of population[2]. It is the second smallest of Ulster’s 9 counties in size and smallest in terms of population.

The county borders County Tyrone (NI) to the north, County Armagh (NI) to the east, County Louth to the southeast, County Meath to the south, County Cavan to the southwest and County Fermanagh (NI) to the west. There is a pene-enclave jutting into Fermanagh in the western area of the county.

Contents

History

In 1585, Sir John Perrot, the natural son of King Henry VIII, visited the area and met with the Irish chieftains. They requested that Ulster be divided into counties and land in the kingdom of Airgíalla be apportioned to each of the McMahon chiefs. A commission was established to accomplish this and County Monaghan came into being. The County was subdivided into the five baronies that exist today: Farney, Cremorne, Dartrey, Monaghan, and Truagh, which was left under the control of the McKenna chieftans.

After the defeat of the rebellion of Hugh O'Neill, The O'Neill and the Ulster chieftains in 1603, the county was not planted like the other counties of Ulster. The lands were instead left in the hands of the native chieftains. In the Irish Rebellion of 1641 the McMahons and their allies joined the general rebellion of Irish Catholics, and following their defeat there was some plantation of the county with Scottish and English families.

Twinning

County Monaghan is twinned with the Province of Prince Edward Island in Canada. At least 20% of the population of Prince Edward Island can trace ancestry to Co Monaghan as a result of migration from Monaghan to that part of Canada during the years 1820-1840. Co Monaghan is also twinned with the City of Miramichi in New Brunswick and also with the City of Peterborough in Ontario and with the township of Cavan-Millbrook-North Monaghan in Ontario.

It also has links with Gheel in Belgium, as a result of the martyrdom there in the 5th century of St Dymphna, a local Monaghan saint who is regarded as Patroness of those with mental illness.

The following places are twinned with Co. Monaghan:

Geography

There are several mountains in the county: Mullyash Mountain, Slieve Beagh (on the border with Tyrone and Fermanagh) and Coolberrin Hill (214 m).

There are also a large number of lakes, including Lough Egish, Lough Fea, Muckno Lough, Lough Avaghon, Inner Lough (in Dartrey Forest), Drumlona Lough, White Lough and Emy Lough.

Rivers in Monaghan include the river Fane (in the southeast of the county and along the border with Louth), river Glyde (along the Louth and Meath borders), the River Blackwater (along the border with County Tyrone) and Dromore River (along the border of County Cavan, linking Cootehill to Ballybay).

Monaghan also has a number of forests, including Rossmore Forest, Dartrey Forest and Dún na Rí Forest Park. Managed by Coillte since 1988, the majority of trees are conifers. Due to a long history of intensive farming practices and recent intensive forestry practices only small pockets of native woodland remain.

The Finn Bridge is a border crossing point across the River Finn between County Monaghan in the Republic of Ireland close to Scotshouse.

Culture & arts

Monaghan is the birthplace of the poet and writer Patrick Kavanagh, who based much of his work in the county. Kavanagh is one of the most significant figures in 20th century Irish Poetry. The poems Stony Grey Soil and Shancoduff refer to the county. The county was also home to the writer of the much-loved Irish ballad Danny Boy, whose lyrics, written to the tune of The Derry Air, mark the poignant departure of his son for war from the historic town of Clones in the west of the county.

Notable residents

Towns and villages

Monaghan is the principal town. Other major towns include Carrickmacross, Castleblayney, and Clones. Towns with legally defined boundaries are shown in italics.

Subdivisions

Baronies

  • Cremorne (Críoch Mhúrn)
  • Dartree (Dartraí)
  • Farney (Fearnaigh)
  • Monaghan (Muineachán)
  • Trough (an Triúcha)

Parishes

Townlands

Notes

  1. ^ From Census 2006 Preliminary Report - Table 1
  2. ^ Corry, Eoghan (2005). The GAA Book of Lists. Hodder Headline Ireland. pp. 186–191. 
  3. ^ [http://www.cso.ie/census for post 1821 figures, 1653 and 1659 figures from Civil Survey Census of those years, Paper of Mr Hardinge to Royal Irish Academy March 14, 1865, For a discussion on he accuracy of pre-famine census returns see JJ Lee “On the accuracy of the Pre-famine Irish censuses Irish Population, Economy and Society edited by JM Goldstrom and LA Clarkson (1981) p54, in and also New Developments in Irish Population History, 1700-1850 by Joel Mokyr and Cormac O Grada in The Economic History Review, New Series, Vol. 37, No. 4 (Nov., 1984), pp. 473-488. ]
  4. ^ "Tommy Bowe 2009 British and Irish Lions Squad Profile". http://www.lions-tour.com/the_lions/profile.asp?id=62. Retrieved 10 November 2009. 
  5. ^ Chris True. "Biography: Monaghan Mimic". all music. http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p=amg&sql=11:0ifixzu5ldde~T1. Retrieved 10 November 2009. 
  6. ^ Joy E. Parnaby (1972). "Duffy, Sir Charles Gavan (1816 - 1903)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. Melbourne University Press. http://adbonline.anu.edu.au/biogs/A040109b.htm. Retrieved 10 November 2009. 
  7. ^ "Barry McGuigan". BoxRec.com Boxing Encyclopedia. http://www.boxrec.com/list_bouts.php?human_id=012746&cat=boxer. Retrieved 10 November 2009. 
  8. ^ "Life". Patrick Kavanagh 1904 – 1967. Patrick Kavanagh Trust, Trinity College Dublin. http://www.tcd.ie/English/patrickkavanagh/life.html. Retrieved 10 November 2009. 
  9. ^ "Big Tom". BBC Music. BBC. http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/artists/3ead0fc5-d162-4a3b-87d6-cbaca9d1d853. Retrieved 10 November 2009. 
  10. ^ "GEN. EOIN O'DUFFY (1892 -1944)". Cumann na nGaedhael History. Collins 22 Society. http://generalmichaelcollins.com/Fine_Gael/Eoin_O_Duffy.html. Retrieved 10 November 2009. 

See also

External links

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Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

Monaghan is a county in Northwest Ireland and Lakelands.

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Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Familypedia

This article requires significantly more historical detail on the particular phases of this location's historical development. The ideal article for a place will give the reader a feel for what it was like to live at that location at the time their relatives were alive there..
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County Monaghan
Contae Mhuineacháin
Coat of arms of County Monaghan
Location
centerMap highlighting County Monaghan
Statistics
Province: Ulster
County Town: Monaghan
Code: MN
Area: 1,294 km²
Population (2006[1]) 55,816
Website: www.monaghan.ie

County Monaghan (Irish: Contae Mhuineacháin) is a county in the Republic of Ireland. It is one of three counties situated in the province of Ulster without being part of Northern Ireland. The name comes from the Irish, derived from Muine Cheain meaning the Land of the little hills. This name refers to the density of drumlins in the area, those small hills formed from glacial action (during a previous ice age).

The county borders County Tyrone (Northern Ireland) to the north, County Armagh (NI) to the east, County Louth (Republic of Ireland) to the southeast, County Meath (ROI) to the south, County Cavan (ROI) to the southwest and County Fermanagh (NI) to the west.

There is a pene-enclave jutting into Fermanagh in the western area of the county.

Monaghan is the principal town. Other major towns include Carrickmacross, Castleblayney, and Clones.

Monaghan is the birthplace of the poet and writer Patrick Kavanagh, who based much of his work in the county. Kavanagh is one of the most significant figures in mid 20th century Irish Poetry. The poems Stony Grey Soil and Shancoduff refer to the county.

Contents

Twinning

County Monaghan is twinned with the Province of Prince Edward Island in Canada. At least 20% of the population of Prince Edward Island can trace ancestry to Co Monaghan as a result of migration from Monaghan to that part of Canada during the years 1820-1840. Co Monaghan is also twinned with the City of Miramichi in New Brunswick and also with the City of Peterborough in Ontario and with the township of Cavan-Millbrook-North Monaghan in Ontario.

It also has links with Gheel in Belgium, as a result of the martyrdom there in the 5th century of St Dymphna, a local Monaghan saint who is regarded as Patroness of those with mental illness.

The following places are twinned with Co. Monaghan:

Geography

There are several mountains in the county: Mullyash Mountain, Slieve Beagh (on the border with Tyrone and Fermanagh) and Coolberrin Hill (214 m).

There are also a large number of lakes, including Lough Egish, Lough Fea, Muckno Lough, Lough Avaghon, Inner Lough (in Dartrey Forest), Drumlona Lough, White Lough and Emy Lough.

Rivers in Monaghan include the river Fane (in the southeast of the county and along the border with Louth), river Glyde (along the Louth and Meath borders), the river Blackwater (along the border with Tyrone, Northern Ireland) and Dromore river (along the border of Cavan, linking Cootehill to Ballybay).

Monaghan also has a number of forests, including Rossmore Forest, Dartrey Forest and Dún na Rí Forest Park. Managed by Coillte since 1988, the majority of trees are conifers. Due to a long history of intensive farming practices and recent intensive forestry practices only small pockets of native woodland remain.

Towns and villages

Towns with legally defined boundaries are shown in italics.

Notes

External links


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at County Monaghan. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
Facts about County MonaghanRDF feed

This article uses material from the "County Monaghan" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

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