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County Tipperary
Contae Thiobraid Árann
Coat of arms of County Tipperary
Location
Map highlighting County Tipperary
Statistics
Province: Munster
County seat: North: Nenagh
South: Clonmel
Code: North: TN
South: TS
Area: 4,303 km2 (1,661 sq mi)
Population (2006) 149,040[1]

County Tipperary (Irish: Contae Thiobraid Árann) is one of the traditional Counties of Ireland. It is located in the province of Munster. It was named after the town of Tipperary (Irish: Tiobraid Árann).

Tipperary is the sixth largest of Ireland’s 32 counties in area and 11th largest in terms of population[1]. It is the third largest of Munster’s 6 counties in size and third largest in terms of population.

Tipperary was one of the first Irish counties to be established in the 13th century. For all government administration purposes the county is divided into North Tipperary (county town: Nenagh) and South Tipperary (county town: Clonmel). This division dates back to the Local Government (Ireland) Act 1898, the county's two "ridings" having had separate assize courts for much longer. The use of riding for the divisions was a historical misnomer, since the word derives from the dividing of an area into three parts. Indeed the expression riding has been discontinued for official purposes since 2002 (Local Government Act, 2001 section 10 and schedule 5).

Contents

Geography

The region is part of the central plain of Ireland, but the terrain is diversified by several mountain ranges: the Knockmealdown, the Galtee, the Arra, and the Silvermine. The southern portion of the county is drained by the Suir River; the northern by tributaries of the Shannon , which widens into Lough Derg on the northern border.

The centre of County Tipperary is known as 'the Golden Vale', a rich pastoral stretch of land in the basin of the River Suir, which crosses the county from north to south.

Towns and villages

Townlands

Culture

Tipperary is sometimes referred to as the Premier County, a description attributed[citation needed] to Thomas Davis, Editor of The Nation newspaper in the 1840s as a tribute to the nationalistic feeling in Tipperary and said[citation needed] that "where Tipperary leads, Ireland follows". Tipperary is famous for its horse breeding industry and is the home of Coolmore Stud, which is the largest thoroughbred breeding operation in the world. The County forms a large part of the Golden Vale (or Vein) of Munster, boasting a rich and fertile agricultural landscape. The County particularly nurtures the ancient game of hurling and its teams have regularly been champions of Ireland since the 19th century.

Economy

There is much fertile land, especially in the region known as the Golden Vale, one of the richest agricultural areas in Ireland. Dairy farming and cattle raising are the principal occupations. Other industries are slate quarrying and the manufacture of meal and flour.

Tourism plays a significant role in County Tipperary - Lough Derg, Thurles, Rock of Cashel and Bru Boru Heritage Centre and Tipperary Crystal are some of the primary tourist destinations in the county.

Transport

Road transport dominates in County Tipperary. The M8 motorway bisects the county from north of Two-Mile-Borris to the County Limerick border and is one of the busiest roads on the island. The Limerick to Dublin N7 national primary route also crosses the north of the county. In addition, the Limerick to Waterford N24 crosses the southern half of Tipperary, travelling through Tipperary Town, Bansha, north of Cahir and around Clonmel. In addition to travel by road, Tipperary also has a number or railway stations situated on the Dublin to Cork and Dublin to Limerick rail lines.

Sports

County Tipperary has a strong sporting history and is home to the Gaelic Games of Hurling, Gaelic Football, Camogie and Handball.

In popular culture

The town of Tipperary situated in the south west of the county was the subject of the famous World War I British army song "It's a Long Way to Tipperary".

County Anthem

The song Slievenamon is traditionally associated with the county. It is common at GAA fixtures involving the county.[8]

Places of interest

See also

References

  1. ^ Corry, Eoghan (2005). The GAA Book of Lists. Hodder Headline Ireland. pp. 186–191. 
  2. ^ For 1653 and 1659 figures from Civil Survey Census of those years, Paper of Mr Hardinge to Royal Irish Academy March 14, 1865.
  3. ^ Census for post 1821 figures.
  4. ^ http://www.histpop.org
  5. ^ http://www.nisranew.nisra.gov.uk/census
  6. ^ Lee, JJ (1981). "On the accuracy of the Pre-famine Irish censuses". in Goldstrom, J. M.; Clarkson, L. A.. Irish Population, Economy, and Society: Essays in Honour of the Late K. H. Connell. Oxford, England: Clarendon Press. 
  7. ^ Mokyr, Joel; O Grada, Cormac (November), "New Developments in Irish Population History, 1700-1850", The Economic History Review Volume 37 (Issue 4): 473–488, doi:10.1111/j.1468-0289.1984.tb00344.x, http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/120035880/abstract 
  8. ^ http://www.irishpage.com/songs/slevmoan.htm

External links


Coordinates: 52°40′N 7°50′W / 52.667°N 7.833°W / 52.667; -7.833

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Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

Cahir castle
Cahir castle

County Tipperary (Tiobraid Árainn in Irish) is a county in the Shannon Region of Ireland.

Understand

Tipperary is a large and beautiful county situated in the mid-west of Ireland. The river Shannon runs down the western edge - including the picturesque Lough Derg, and its twin town of Ballina and Killaloe (Co. Clare). The population is approximately 135,000.

  • Cahir
  • Carrick-On-Suir
  • Cashel
  • Clonmel
  • Nenagh
  • Roscrea
  • Templemore
  • Thurles
  • Tipperary
  • Fethard

Other destinations

Borrisokane

Get in

Shannon airport and the city of Limerick are nearby. Due to its large size and central position (within Ireland it is usually NOT a long way to Tipperary), parts of the county may be visited from Dublin, Waterford, Cork, Limerick or Galway.

Get around

The county is well served by road and rail. Limerick Junction railway station is 4 km from Tipperary town.

  • The Rock of Cashel is worth a visit.
  • Cahir Castle is a must see.
  • The Swiss Cottage in Cahir.
  • Mitchelstown Caves are outside the town, but are renowned for their beauty and size.
  • The Glen of Aherlow is as breathtaking as any of the famed views in Killarney (Co. Kerry).
  • The Galtee mountains are a fine-looking range, topped by one of Ireland's highest in Galtymore mountain (1000 metres).

The whole Lough Derg area is worth visiting. This runs for about 30 miles from Ballina, Garrykennedy, Dromineer, Puckane, Terryglass and on up to Portumna. You can even continue down the Clare side of the lake back to your starting point.

Eat

If visiting South Tipperary - dinner at Lily Mai's Restaurant in Thomastown (between Cashel and Tipperary Town) is a must! Open Thursday, Friday and Saturday night (booking is essential)- Lily Mai's has won all the awards since it opened 3-years ago. Fine dining at its best! 062.72847 for reservations. As one of Tipperarys main tourist towns, Cashel has a number of eating possibilities - however the pre-eminent one remains Chez Hans, now in it's second generation, serving a 'best of irish menu' in a converted Church. They also provide a cheaper bistro option during the day.

  • Paddys Bar & Restaurant, Terryglass, North Tipperary Tel: +353 (067)22147 Paddy's Bar is located in the village of Terryglass about five miles from Portumna. This is a beautiful village noted for it's achievements in Ireland's tidiest town competition.

In Nenagh try the Peppermill Restaurant or The Abbot's Bistro or Cloister Restaurant at the Abbey Court Hotel.

Just discovered Lily Mai's Cafe between Carrick-0n-Suir and Clonmel - excellent food and herself can go shopping in Blarney Woollen Mills and Meadows & Byrne as well! I have had Sunday lunch there with the family - top class - and have dropped-in twice when on the way to Waterford. Both ocasions have proved well-worth it. Food is top-drawer. The also have a Deli - very Avoca!

  • There are many outstanding farmers markets around the county that sell local food grown and produced in the region. Markets take place in Carrick-on-suir, Cahir, Thurles and Nenagh. Cahir Farmers Market takes place every Saturday morning from 9am - 1pm and is held in the carpark beside the Granary Craft Centre, a 2 minute walk from the train station. Produce inculdes potatoes, apples, home grown vegetables, home baking, jams and jellies, local cheeses, pate, organic meats, flowers and plants, eggs etc... and is all of very high quality. As with all markets, it is the case of the early bird catches the worm in Cahir!

Drink

In Nenagh the following two pubs are well worth a visit. Rohan's on Sarsfield Street is a very friendly local pub, caught in an authentic 1970's timewarp. Una Powell's in the Summerhill area is another fine local pub. Both are generally only open in the evenings.

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Tipperary Country Club situated about 5 miles from Cashel in the village of Dundrum provides a testing 18 hole golf course, designed by former Ryder Cup Player, Philip Walton.


Genealogy

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Familypedia

This article requires significantly more historical detail on the particular phases of this location's historical development. The ideal article for a place will give the reader a feel for what it was like to live at that location at the time their relatives were alive there..
Please help to improve this page yourself if you can..
County Tipperary
Contae Thiobraid Árann
Location
centerMap highlighting County Tipperary
Statistics
Province: Munster
County Town: North: Nenagh
South: Clonmel
Code: North: TN
South: TS
Area: 4,303 km²
Population (2006) 149,040[prelim table01.pdf]

County Tipperary (Irish: Contae Thiobraid Árann ) is a county in the Republic of Ireland situated in the province of Munster. Tipperary was one of the first Irish counties to be established in the 13th century. For all government administration purposes the county is divided into North Tipperary (county town: Nenagh) and South Tipperary (county town: Clonmel). This division dates back to the Local Government (Ireland) Act 1898, the county's two "ridings" having had separate assize courts for much longer. The use of riding for the divisions was a historical misnomer, since the word derives from the dividing of an area into three parts. Indeed the expression riding has been discontinued for official purposes since 2002 (Local Government Act, 2001 section 10 and schedule 5)

Tipperary is sometimes referred to as the Premier County, a description attributed to Thomas Davis, Editor of The Nation newspaper in the 1840s as a tribute to the nationalistic feeling in Tipperary and said that "where Tipperary leads, Ireland follows". Tipperary is famous for its horse breeding industry and is the home of Coolmore Stud, which is the largest thoroughbred breeding operation in the world. The County forms a large part of the Golden Vale (or Vein) of Munster, boasting a rich and fertile agricultural landscape. The County particularly nurtures the ancient game of hurling and its teams have regularly been champions of Ireland since the 19th century.

The town of Tipperary situated in the south west of the county was the subject of the famous World War I British army song It's a Long Way to Tipperary. As with several other counties in Ireland named for a town or village (examples include Leitrim and Mayo) Tipperary Town has never been the county town of County Tipperary. That honour belonged to Cashel for a while prior to the creation of the County Palatine and thereafter to Clonmel until the creation of separate assizes in 1838 when Clonmel has shared the honour with Nenagh

Contents

Towns, villages, and townlands

Places of interest

See also

External links


This page uses content from the English language Wikipedia. The original content was at County Tipperary. The list of authors can be seen in the page history. As with this Familypedia wiki, the content of Wikipedia is available under the Creative Commons License.
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This article uses material from the "County Tipperary" article on the Genealogy wiki at Wikia and is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike License.

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