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Crimson
About these coordinates About these coordinates
— Color coordinates —
Hex triplet #DC143C
RGBB (r, g, b) (220, 20, 60)
HSV (h, s, v) (348°, 91%, 86[1]%)
Source X11
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Crimson is a strong, bright, deep red color combined with some blue, resulting in a tiny degree of purple. It is originally the color of the dye produced from a scale insect, Kermes vermilio, but the name is now also used in general as a generic term for those slightly bluish-red colors that are between red and rose; besides crimson itself, these colors include carmine, raspberry, ruddy, ruby, amaranth, and cerise.

Contents

History

Crimson was produced using the dried bodies of the kermes insect, which were gathered commercially in Mediterranean countries, where they live on the Kermes oak, and sold throughout Europe[2]. Kermes dyes have been found in burial wrappings in Anglo-Scandinavian York. They fell out of use with the introduction of cochineal, because although the dyes were comparable in quality and color intensity it needed ten to twelve times as much kermes to produce the same effect as cochineal.

Carmine is the name given to the dye made from the dried bodies of the female cochineal, although the name crimson is sometimes applied to these dyes too. Cochineal appears to have been discovered during the conquest of Mexico by the Spaniard Hernán Cortés, and the name 'carmine' is derived from the Spanish word for crimson. It was first described by Mathioli in 1549. The pigment is also called cochineal after the insect from which it is made.

Alizarin is a pigment that was first synthesized in 1868 by the German chemists Carl Gräbe and Carl Liebermann and replaced the natural pigment madder lake. Alizarin crimson is a dye bonded onto alum which is then used as a pigment and mixed with ochre, sienna and umber. It is not totally colorfast.

Etymology

The word crimson has been recorded in English since 1400,[3] and its earlier forms include cremesin, crymysyn and cramoysin (cf. cramoisy, a crimson cloth). These were adapted via Old Spanish from the Medieval Latin cremesinus (also kermesinus or carmesinus), the dye produced from Kermes scale insects, and can be traced back to the Turkish kırmızı (red in Turkish), and to the Persian ghermez (red in Persian).

A shortened form of carmesinus also gave the Latin carminus, from which comes carmine.

Other cognates include the Old Church Slavic čruminu and the Russian čermnyj "red". Cf. also vermilion.

Dyes

Carminic acid

Carmine dyes, which give crimson and related red and purple colors, are based on an aluminium and calcium salt of carminic acid. Carmine lake is an aluminium or aluminium-tin lake of cochineal extract, and Crimson lake is prepared by striking down an infusion of cochineal with a 5 percent solution of alum and cream of tartar. Purple lake is prepared like carmine lake with the addition of lime to produce the deep purple tone. Carmine dyes tend to fade quickly.

Carmine dyes were once widely prized in both the Americas and in Europe. They were used in paints by Michelangelo and for the crimson fabrics of the Hussars, the Turks, the British Redcoats, and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

Nowadays carmine dyes are used for coloring foodstuffs, medicines and cosmetics. As a food additive, carmine dyes are designated E120, and are also called cochineal and Natural Red 4. Carmine dyes are also used in some oil paints and watercolors used by artists.

Alizarin crimson

Alizarin Crimson
About these coordinates About these coordinates
— Color coordinates —
Hex triplet #E32636
RGBB (r, g, b) (227, 38, 54)
HSV (h, s, v) (348°, 90%, 77%)
Source [Unsourced]
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

The shade of red on the infobox to the right is alizarin crimson. This is an artificially created color, used to replace the harder to obtain rose madder.


Electric crimson

Electric Crimson
About these coordinates About these coordinates
— Color coordinates —
Hex triplet #FF003F
RGBB (r, g, b) (255, 0, 63)
HSV (h, s, v) (345°, 100%, 100[4]%)
Source HTML Color Chart @345
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Displayed at right is the color electric crimson.

Electric crimson is that tone of crimson which is precisely halfway between red and rose on the color wheel (RGB color wheel).


Folly

Folly
About these coordinates About these coordinates
— Color coordinates —
Hex triplet #FF004F
RGBB (r, g, b) (255, 0, 79)
HSV (h, s, v) (341°, 100%, 100[5]%)
Source Maerz and Paul
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Displayed at right is the color folly.

Folly is a color one-fourth of the way between crimson and rose, closer to crimson than to rose. The first recorded use of folly as a color name in English was in 1920.[6]


Razzmatazz

Razzmatazz
About these coordinates About these coordinates
— Color coordinates —
Hex triplet #E3256B
RGBB (r, g, b) (227, 37, 107)
HSV (h, s, v) (338°, 84%, 89[7]%)
Source Crayola
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Displayed at right is the color razzmatazz.

This color is a rich tone of crimson-rose.

Razzmatazz was a new Crayola crayon color chosen in 1993 as a part of the Name The New Colors Contest.

Harvard crimson

Harvard Crimson
About these coordinates About these coordinates
— Color coordinates —
Hex triplet #C90016
RGBB (r, g, b) (201, 0, 22)
HSV (h, s, v) (353°, 100%, 79[8]%)
Source Internet
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Displayed at right is the color Harvard crimson, the color which is symbolic of Harvard University.

The first recorded use of Harvard crimson as a color name in English was in 1928.[9]



Crimson glory

The ornamental grape crimson glory vine autumn colors
Crimson Glory
About these coordinates About these coordinates
— Color coordinates —
Hex triplet #BE0032
RGBB (r, g, b) (190, 0, 50)
HSV (h, s, v) (356°, 100%, 75[10]%)
Source Plochere
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

The color crimson glory is displayed at right. It is a medium shade of crimson.

The color is a representation of the color of the flowers of the Crimson Glory Vine.

The first use of crimson glory as a color name in English was in 1948 when the Plochere Color System was inaugurated.

The source of the color name crimson glory is the Plochere Color System, a color system formulated in 1948 that is widely used by interior designers.[11]

OU Crimson

OU Logo
OU Crimson
About these coordinates About these coordinates
— Color coordinates —
Hex triplet #990000
RGBB (r, g, b) (153, 0, 0)
Source Official Logos
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

OU Crimson, along with Cream, are the official colors for The University of Oklahoma, and its athletic teams, the Oklahoma Sooners. In the fall of 1895, Miss May Overstreet was asked to chair a committee to select the colors of the university. The committee decided the colors should be crimson and cream and an elaborate display of the colors was draped above a platform before the student body.[12]

OU Crimson is also an official color for the National Weather Center.[13]

Crimson in human culture

Computer & Video Games

  • In the computer game Diablo using an eldritch shrine will give you the message Crimson and Azure becomes as the sun.
  • Crimson is a color of Nintendo DS Lite (crimson on top, black on bottom).
  • In the arcade game The King Of Fighters, one of the main characters is called Ash Crimson owing to his red outfit and his personality.
  • Crimson is a name given to Rosso in Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII for her red outfit and bloodthirsty nature.
  • In the 1997 playstation strategy game Vandal Hearts the Crimson Guard were a bloodthirsty order of knights and soldiers that's crimson armour matched the color of the blood they spilled.
  • In the MMORPG MapleStory, the color "Crimson" is a recurring theme on the continent of Masteria, at the castle Crimsonwood Keep, founded by a man named Christopher Crimsonheart, and protected by the deadly Crimson Guardians, all of which are crimson in color.
  • Crimson Skies is a video game about air pirates in an alternate universe 1930s North America.
  • The sequel to Fatal Frame is called "Fatal Frame II: Crimson Butterfly," as the game is based around spirits of those who have passed away becoming crimson colored butterflies.

Cultural references

  • In English, crimson is traditionally associated with the color of blood, and hence is associated with violence, courage and martyrdom. It was the most distinctive color of British officers' uniforms until the introduction of khaki camouflage, and remains in use for the colours (flag). The King's Royal Hussars still wear crimson trousers as successors to the 11th Hussars (the "Cherrypickers"). However, the haemoglobin red is darker and has a lower chroma, and the haemoglobin molecule is structurally unrelated.
  • In Polish, karmazyn ('crimson') is also a synonym for a Magnate, i.e., a member of the nobility.

Emblem colors

Literature

  • In the Old Testament, the prophet Isaiah uses crimson to symbolize sin. Isaiah 1:18 states, "'Come now, let us reason together,' says the LORD. 'Though your sins are like scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they are red as crimson, they shall be like wool."
  • In fiction, the primary villain of Stephen King's The Dark Tower series is the Crimson King. The Crimson King also makes appearances in other King works, such as the novel Insomnia. Bev Vincent notes in his The Road to the Dark Tower that the color is intended to symbolize sickness, madness, and pain.
  • In the Star Trek universe, in the mirror universe, the Terran Empire has a flag that displays the symbol of the empire, a map of Earth with a dagger through it facing downward, rendered in gold on a field of crimson. By apparent analogy with the nickname Old Glory for the Flag of the United States in our universe, the flag of the Terran Empire is called by the nickname Crimson Glory.[14][15]

Military

Music

Panelology

Television

See also

References

  1. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code of color #DC143C (Crimson):
  2. ^ Naturenet article with images and description of Kermes vermilio and its foodplant
  3. ^ The first recorded use of crimson as a color name in English was in 1400 according to the following book: Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930--McGraw Hill Page 193; Color Sample of Crimson: Page 31 Plate 4 Color Sample K6
  4. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code of color #FF003F (Electric Crimson):
  5. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code of color # FF004F (Folly):
  6. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930--McGraw Hill Page 193; Color Sample of Folly: Page 27 Plate 2 Color Sample J6; on the upper half of Plate 2, the color Folly is shown as being one-fourth of the way between crimson and rose, closer to crimson than to rose.
  7. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code of color #E3256B (Razzmatazz):
  8. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code of color #C90016 (Harvard Crimson):
  9. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930--McGraw Hill Page 196; Color Sample of Harvard Crimson: Page 33 Plate 5 Color Sample J6
  10. ^ web.forret.com Color Conversion Tool set to hex code of color #BE0032 (Crimson Glory):
  11. ^ Plochere Color System:
  12. ^ Sooner Tradition - Crimson & Cream
  13. ^ National Weather Center Logo
  14. ^ Berman, Rick and Braga, Brannan (Creators of Star Trek: Enterprise) editors Glass Empires (Three Tales of the Mirror Universe)--Age of the Empress by Karen Ward and Kevin Dilmore [Story by Mike Sussman]; Sorrows of Empire by David Mack; The Worst of Both Worlds by Greg Cox) New York:2007 Pocket Books, a division of Simon & Schuster, Inc. (Trade Paperback) Page 230
  15. ^ Image of the Flag of the Terran Empire on Flags of the World website:
  16. ^ Flash #284 April 1980 New York:1980 DC Comics Inc. On the cover of this comic book, The Flash is referred to as the Crimson Comet



1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

CRIMSON, the name of a strong, bright red colour tinged to a greater or less degree with purple. It is the colour of the dye produced from the dried bodies of the cochineal insect (Coccus cacti). The word, in its earlier forms cremesin, crymysyn, also cramoysin, cf. "cramoisy," the name of a red cloth, is adapted from the Med. Lat. cremesinus for kermesinus or carmesinus, the dye produced from the insect Kermes (Coccus ilicis), Arab. quirmiz, which Skeat (Etym. Diet., 1898) connects with the Sanskrit krimi, cognate with Lat. vermis and Eng. "worm." From the Lat. carminus, a shortened form of carmesinus, comes "carmine" (q.v.).


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Bible wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010
(Redirected to Colour article)

From BibleWiki

The subject of colours holds an important place in the Scriptures.

White occurs as the translation of various Hebrew words. It is applied to milk (Gen 49:12), manna (Ex 16:31), snow (Isa 1:18), horses (Zech 1:8), raiment (Eccl 9:8). Another Hebrew word so rendered is applied to marble (Est 1:6), and a cognate word to the lily (Song 2:16). A different term, meaning "dazzling," is applied to the countenance (Song 5:10).

This colour was an emblem of purity and innocence (Mk 16:5; Jn 20:12; Rev 19:8, 14), of joy (Eccl 9:8), and also of victory (Zech 6:3; Rev 6:2). The hangings of the tabernacle court (Ex 27:9; 38:9), the coats, mitres, bonnets, and breeches of the priests (Ex 39:27,28), and the dress of the high priest on the day of Atonement (Lev 16:4,32), were white.

Black, applied to the hair (Lev 13:31; Song 5:11), the complexion (Song 1:5), and to horses (Zech 6:2,6). The word rendered "brown" in Gen 30:32 (R.V., "black") means properly "scorched", i.e., the colour produced by the influence of the sun's rays. "Black" in Job 30:30 means dirty, blackened by sorrow and disease. The word is applied to a mourner's robes (Jer 8:21; 14:2), to a clouded sky (1 Kg 18:45), to night (Mic 3:6; Jer 4:28), and to a brook rendered turbid by melted snow (Job 6:16). It is used as symbolical of evil in Zech 6:2, 6 and Rev 6:5. It was the emblem of mourning, affliction, calamity (Jer 14:2; Lam 4:8; 5:10).

Red, applied to blood (2 Kings 3;22), a heifer (Num 19:2), pottage of lentils (Gen 25:30), a horse (Zech 1:8), wine (Prov 23:31), the complexion (Gen 25:25; Song 5:10). This colour is symbolical of bloodshed (Zech 6:2; Rev 6:4; 12:3).

Purple, a colour obtained from the secretion of a species of shell-fish (the Murex trunculus) which was found in the Mediterranean, and particularly on the coasts of Phoenicia and Asia Minor. The colouring matter in each separate shell-fish amounted to only a single drop, and hence the great value of this dye. Robes of this colour were worn by kings (Jdg 8:26) and high officers (Est 8:15). They were also worn by the wealthy and luxurious (Jer 10:9; Ezek 27:7; Lk 16:19; Rev 17:4). With this colour was associated the idea of royalty and majesty (Jdg 8:26; Song 3:10; 7:5; Dan 5:7, 16,29).

Blue. This colour was also procured from a species of shell-fish, the chelzon of the Hebrews, and the Helix ianthina of modern naturalists. The tint was emblematic of the sky, the deep dark hue of the Eastern sky. This colour was used in the same way as purple. The ribbon and fringe of the Hebrew dress were of this colour (Num 15:38). The loops of the curtains (Ex 26:4), the lace of the high priest's breastplate, the robe of the ephod, and the lace on his mitre, were blue (Ex 28:28, 31, 37).

Scarlet, or Crimson. In Isa 1:18 a Hebrew word is used which denotes the worm or grub whence this dye was procured. In Gen 38:28,30, the word so rendered means "to shine," and expresses the brilliancy of the colour. The small parasitic insects from which this dye was obtained somewhat resembled the cochineal which is found in Eastern countries. It is called by naturalists Coccus ilics. The dye was procured from the female grub alone. The only natural object to which this colour is applied in Scripture is the lips, which are likened to a scarlet thread (Song 4:3). Scarlet robes were worn by the rich and luxurious (2 Sam 1:24; Prov 31:21; Jer 4:30. Rev 17:4). It was also the hue of the warrior's dress (Nah 2:3; Isa 9:5). The Phoenicians excelled in the art of dyeing this colour (2Chr 2:7).

These four colours--white, purple, blue, and scarlet--were used in the textures of the tabernacle curtains (Ex 26:1, 31, 36), and also in the high priest's ephod, girdle, and breastplate (Ex 28:5, 6, 8, 15). Scarlet thread is mentioned in connection with the rites of cleansing the leper (Lev 14:4, 6, 51) and of burning the red heifer (Num 19:6). It was a crimson thread that Rahab was to bind on her window as a sign that she was to be saved alive (Josh 2:18; 6:25) when the city of Jericho was taken.

Vermilion, the red sulphuret of mercury, or cinnabar; a colour used for drawing the figures of idols on the walls of temples (Ezek 23:14), or for decorating the walls and beams of houses (Jer 22:14).

This entry includes text from Easton's Bible Dictionary, 1897.

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Simple English

This box shows the color crimson.
 

Crimson is deep purplish red color between red and rose. You can make it by combining a strong, bright deep red with a little blue. It is originally the color of the dye produced from the dried bodies of a scale insect, Kermes vermilio.

The word crimson has been recorded in English since 1400,[1]

Contents

Meaning of crimson

  • Crimson was the most distinctive color of British officers' uniforms until the introduction of khaki camouflage, and remains in use for the colours (flag). The King's Royal Hussars still wear crimson trousers.
  • In Poland, karmazyn ('crimson') is a synonym for a Magnate (someone who is a member of the nobility).


Tones of crimson color comparison chart

  • Pink (web color) (Tamarisk) (Hex: #FFCBDB) (RGB: 255, 192, 203)
  • Cotton Candy (Crayola) (Hex: #FFB7D5) (RGB: 255, 183, 213)
  • Carnation Pink (Crayola) (Hex: #FFA6C9) (RGB: 246, 166, 201)
  • Amaranth Pink (Hex: #F19CBB) (RGB: 241, 156, 187)
  • Light Thulian Pink (Light Icelandic Pink) (Hex: #E68FAC) (RGB: 230, 143, 172)
  • Thulian Pink (Icelandic Pink) (First Lady) (Hex: #DE6FA1) (RGB: 222, 111, 61)
  • Raspberry Pink (Hex: #E25098) (RGB: 226, 80, 155)
  • Cerise Pink (Hex: #EC3B83) (RGB: 236, 59, 131)
  • Cerise (Hex: #DE3163) (RGB: 222, 49, 99)
  • Ruby (Hex: #E0115F) (RGB: 224, 17, 95)
  • Raspberry (Hex: #E30B5C) (RGB: 227, 11, 92)
  • Razzmatazz (Crayola) (Hex: #E3256B) (RGB: 227, 37, 107)
  • Red Devil Light (Xona.com Color List) (Hex: #C51C56) (RGB: 197, 28, 86)
  • Amaranth (Hex: #E52B50) (RGB: 229, 43, 80)
  • Radical Red (Crayola) (Bright Amaranth Pink) (Hex: #FF355E) (RGB: 255, 53, 94)
  • Rose Neyron (Hex: #FF0057) (RGB: 255, 0, 87)
  • Folly (Hex: #FF004F) (RGB: 255, 0, 79)
  • Cherry Red (Hex: #FF0047) (RGB: 255, 0, 71)
  • Electric Crimson (Hex: #FF003F) (RGB: 255, 0, 63)
  • American Rose (American Beauty) (Hex: #FF033E) (RGB: 255, 3, 62)
  • Carmine Red (Hex: #FF0038) (RGB: 255, 0, 56)
  • Alizarin Crimson (Rose Madder) (Hex: #E32636) (RGB: 227, 38, 54)
  • CRIMSON (web color) (Hex: #DC143C) (RGB: 220, 20, 60)
  • Utah Crimson (Hex: #D3003F) (RGB: 211, 0, 63)
  • Harvard Crimson (Hex: #C90016) (RGB: 201, 0, 22)
  • Crimson Glory (Hex: #BE0032) (RGB: 190, 0, 50)
  • Medium Crimson (Prismacolor PC924 Crimson Red) (Hex: #AD1022) (RGB: 173, 16, 34)
  • OU Crimson (University of Oklahoma Crimson) (Hex: #990000) (RGB: 153, 0, 0)
  • Red Devil (Xona.com Color List) (Hex: #860111) (RGB: 134, 1, 17)
  • Crimson Lake (Prismacolor PC925) (Hex: #670F25) (RGB: 103, 15, 37)
ColorsList of colors
Cyan Magenta Black Gray Silver White
Red Orange Yellow Green Blue Indigo Violet
Gold Olive Purple Navy Brown Pink

References

  1. The first recorded use of crimson as a color name in English was in 1400 according to the following book: Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930--McGraw Hill Page 193; Color Sample of Crimson: Page 31 Plate 4 Color Sample K6

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