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"Crying in the Chapel" is a song written by Artie Glenn for his son Darrell to sing. Darrell recorded it while still in high school in 1953, along with Artie's band the Rhythm Riders. It became a local hit and publishers got a hold of it and it went nationwide. June Valli had the biggest pop hit version, reaching number four on Billboard after charting for 17 weeks beginning August 1, 1953. That same year, the black group, The Orioles, recorded it, and it became a major success. The Orioles' version went to number one on the R&B chart and number eleven on the pop chart.[1] Darrell Glenn's version hit number six, Rex Allen's number eight, Ella Fitzgerald number 15, and Art Lund reached number 23.[2]

Elvis Presley version

On October 30, 1960, Elvis Presley recorded a version of the song during the sessions for his RCA Records gospel album, His Hand in Mine. It was not included on that album, but rather was held back by RCA and finally released as an "Easter Special" single (447-0643) in April 1965, hitting number three on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart and topping the Easy Listening chart for six weeks, the greatest chart success for Presley over a six-year span. It was later included as a bonus track on Presley's 1967 gospel album, How Great Thou Art. The single was eventually certified "Platinum" by the RIAA for sales in excess of one million units in the US.

The song was redone in the 1980s by Allies, a Christian band, on their 1989 album "Long Way From Paradise".

In popular culture

The original recording by Sonny Till & the Orioles is featured in the film American Graffiti (1973).

References

  • Roy Carr & Mick Farren: Elvis: The Illustrated Record (Harmony Books, 1982), pp. 97, 106.
  1. ^ Whitburn, Joel (2004). Top R&B/Hip-Hop Singles: 1942-2004. Record Research. p. 444.  
  2. ^ Joel Whitburn's Pop Memories 1890-1954
Preceded by
"The Clock" by Johnny Ace and The Beale Streeters
Billboard National R&B Best Sellers number-one single (Sonny Till and the Orioles version)
August 22, 1953 – September 12, 1953
Succeeded by
"Shake a Hand" by Faye Adams
Preceded by
Vaya con Dios
Cash Box magazine best selling record chart number-one single
September 5, 1953
Succeeded by
Vaya con Dios
Preceded by
Vaya con Dios
Cash Box magazine best selling record chart number-one single
September 19, 1953–September 26, 1953
Succeeded by
You, You, You
Preceded by
A Walk in the Black Forest
Billboard Easy Listening number-one single
May 20, 1965 – July 1965
Succeeded by
Cast Your Fate to the Wind
Preceded by
"Long Live Love" by Sandie Shaw
UK number-one single (Elvis Presley version)
17 June 1965
1 July 1965
Succeeded by
"I'm Alive" by The Hollies
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