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Curtiss XF13C: Wikis

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XF13C
Role fighter
National origin United States
Manufacturer Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company
First flight 7 January 1934[1]

The Curtis XF13C (Model 70) was a carrier-based biplane fighter aircraft built by Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company.

Contents

Development and design

The XF13C was an all-metal construction, with a semi-monocoque fuselage, manually retractable landing gear and an enclosed cockpit. The aircraft was design to facilitate conversions from biplane to monoplane and vice-versa. The United States Navy bought a prototype, designated XF13C-1 when in monoplane configuration, and XF13C-2 when a biplane.[1]

The Xf13C first flew in 1934 with good results. In 1935, the plane received a more powerful engine and modifications to the overly tall tailplanes. The designation was changed to XF13C-3 for more flight testing. No production orders were received, but he aircraft flew for NACA experiments, and by VWJ-1 Squadron at Quantico.[1]

Specifications (XF13C-3)

Data from Angelucci, 1987. pp. 152-153.[1]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Length: 25 ft 0 in (7.62 m)
  • Wingspan: 35 ft 0 in (10.66 m)
  • Height: 8 ft 9.5 in (2.66 m)
  • Wing area: 205 ft² (19.04 m²)
  • Empty weight: 3.412 lb (1,548 kg)
  • Gross weight: 4,634 lb (2,102 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Wright SGR-1510-12, 700 hp ( kW)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 246 mph (396 km/h)
  • Range: 726 miles (1,168 km)
  • Service ceiling: 25,250 ft (7,696 m)
  • Rate of climb: 2000 ft/min (10.16 m/s)

Armament

  • 1 × .50 in (12.7 mm) machine gun
  • 1 × .30 in (7.62 mm) machine gun

References

  1. ^ a b c d Angelucci, 1987. pp. 152-153.
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Bibliography

  • Angelucci, Enzo (1987). The American Fighter from 1917 to the present. New York: Orion Books.  

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