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XA-14
Curtiss XA-14
Role Ground attack
Manufacturer Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company
First flight September 1935
Status Prototype
Primary user U.S. Army Air Corps
Number built 1[1]
Variants A-18 Shrike

The Curtiss XA-14 was a 1930s United States airplane, the first multi-engine attack aircraft tested by the United States Army Air Corps. Carrying a crew of two, it was as fast as the standard pursuit aircraft in service at the time.

Contents

Design and development

Originally built as an in-house venture as the Curtiss Model 76, powered by two experimental Wright XR-1510 radial engines, flight testing was sufficiently impressive that after the USAAC appraisal the Model 76 was returned to Curtiss and fitted with two 775 hp (578 kW) Wright R-1670-5 Cyclone engines with constant-speed propellers. This configuration was accepted by the Army with the designation XA-14.[2] It had standard Army markings with the serial number 36-146.[3]

The Model 76 was of all-metal construction with an oval section semimonocoque fuselage, described as "pencil slim". The XA-14 was extensively tested, at one stage being fitted with a 37 mm (1.46 in) nose cannon.[4]

In July 1936 thirteen (serial numbers 37-52 to 37-64) developed versions, re-engined with two Wright R-1820-47 Cyclone twin-row radials, were ordered into production as the Y1A-18.[3]

Specifications (XA-14)

Data from USAF Museum

General characteristics

Performance

Armament

  • 4 × .30 in (7.62 mm) M1919 Browning machine guns forward-firing
  • 1 × .30 in (7.62 mm) machine gun aft-firing
  • 650 lb (295 kg) bombs in internal bay

See also

Related development

Comparable aircraft

Related lists

References

  1. ^ "U.S. Army Aircraft 1908-1946" by James C. Fahey, 1946, 64pp.
  2. ^ "The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft" Editors: Paul Eden & Soph Moeng, (Amber Books Ltd. Bradley's Close, 74-77 White Lion Street, London, NI 9PF, 2002, ISBN 0-7607-3432-1), 1152 pp.
  3. ^ a b "United States Military Aircraft Since 1909" by F. G. Swanborough & Peter M. Bowers (Putnam New York, ISBN 085177816X) 1964, 596 pp.
  4. ^ "The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the 20th Century Weapons and Warfare" Editor: Bernard Fitzsimons (Purnell & Sons Ltd., ISBN 0839361750) 1967/1969, Vol. 21, page 2324
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XA-14
[[Image:|300px|center]]
Curtiss XA-14
Role Ground attack
Manufacturer Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company
First flight September 1935
Status Prototype
Primary user U.S. Army Air Corps
Number built 1[1]
Variants A-18 Shrike

The Curtiss XA-14 was a 1930s United States airplane, the first multi-engine attack aircraft tested by the United States Army Air Corps. Carrying a crew of two, it was as fast as the standard pursuit aircraft in service at the time.

Contents

Design and development

Originally built as an in-house venture as the Curtiss Model 76, powered by two experimental Wright XR-1510 radial engines, flight testing was sufficiently impressive that after the USAAC appraisal the Model 76 was returned to Curtiss and fitted with two 775 hp (578 kW) Wright R-1670-5 Cyclone engines with constant-speed propellers. This configuration was accepted by the Army with the designation XA-14.[2] It had standard Army markings with the serial number 36-146.[3]

The Model 76 was of all-metal construction with an oval section semimonocoque fuselage, described as "pencil slim". The XA-14 was extensively tested, at one stage being fitted with a 37 mm (1.46 in) nose cannon.[4]

In July 1936 thirteen (serial numbers 37-52 to 37-64) developed versions, re-engined with two Wright R-1820-47 Cyclone twin-row radials, were ordered into production as the Y1A-18.[3]

Specifications (XA-14)

Data from USAF Museum

General characteristics

Performance

Armament
  • 4 × .30 in (7.62 mm) M1919 Browning machine guns forward-firing
  • 1 × .30 in (7.62 mm) machine gun aft-firing
  • 650 lb (295 kg) bombs in internal bay
  • See also

    Related development

    Comparable aircraft

    Related lists

    References

    1. "U.S. Army Aircraft 1908-1946" by James C. Fahey, 1946, 64pp.
    2. "The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft" Editors: Paul Eden & Soph Moeng, (Amber Books Ltd. Bradley's Close, 74-77 White Lion Street, London, NI 9PF, 2002, ISBN 0-7607-3432-1), 1152 pp.
    3. 3.0 3.1 "United States Military Aircraft Since 1909" by F. G. Swanborough & Peter M. Bowers (Putnam New York, ISBN 085177816X) 1964, 596 pp.
    4. "The Illustrated Encyclopedia of the 20th Century Weapons and Warfare" Editor: Bernard Fitzsimons (Purnell & Sons Ltd., ISBN 0839361750) 1967/1969, Vol. 21, page 2324

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