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Cuyahoga County, Ohio
Seal of Cuyahoga County, Ohio
Map of Ohio highlighting Cuyahoga County
Location in the state of Ohio
Map of the U.S. highlighting Ohio
Ohio's location in the U.S.
Seat Cleveland
Largest city Cleveland
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

1,246 sq mi (3,226 km²)
458 sq mi (1,187 km²)
787 sq mi (2,038 km²), 63.19%
Population
 - (2000)
 - Density

1,393,978
3,040/sq mi (1,174/km²)
Founded June 7, 1807[1]
Named for "crooked river" possibly in Algonquian

Cuyahoga County (pronounced /ˌkaɪ.əˈhɒɡə/, or /ˌkaɪ.əˈhoʊɡə/)[2][3][4][5] is a county located in the state of Ohio, United States. It is the most populous county in Ohio; as of the 2000 census, the population was 1,393,978. Its county seat is Cleveland[6]. Cuyahoga County is part of Greater Cleveland, a metropolitan area, and Northeast Ohio, a thirteen-county region, joined together in economic development initiatives. The county is named after the Native American word (possibly Algonquian) Cuyahoga, which means "crooked river".[7] The name is also assigned to the Cuyahoga River, which bisects the county. Former U.S. President James A. Garfield was born in what was Cuyahoga County's Orange Township.

Contents

History

Cuyahoga County was organized on June 7, 1807.[8] It was later reduced by the creation of Huron, Lake, and Lorain Counties.[9]

Cuyahoga County in 1874


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Willoughby Township

In 1835, Willoughby was incorporated as a village. Willoughby Township was separated from Cuyahoga County in 1840, when it was made part of Lake County. In later years, Eastlake, Wickliffe, and Willowick would be formed from parts of the township. What was left of the township became known as Willoughby Hills in 1954.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,246 square miles (3,226 km²).458 square miles (1,187 km²) of it is land and 787 square miles (2,038 km²) of it (63.19%) is water. Part of Cuyahoga Valley National Park is located in the southeastern portion of the county.

Major highways

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.  %±
1810 1,459
1820 6,328 333.7%
1830 10,373 63.9%
1840 26,506 155.5%
1850 48,099 81.5%
1860 78,033 62.2%
1870 132,010 69.2%
1880 196,943 49.2%
1890 309,970 57.4%
1900 439,120 41.7%
1910 637,425 45.2%
1920 943,495 48.0%
1930 1,201,455 27.3%
1940 1,217,250 1.3%
1950 1,389,532 14.2%
1960 1,647,895 18.6%
1970 1,721,300 4.5%
1980 1,498,400 −12.9%
1990 1,412,140 −5.8%
2000 1,393,978 −1.3%
Est. 2007 1,295,958 −7.0%
Population 1810-2007.[1]
Cuyahoga County population (Source: United States Census, 2000)

As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 1,393,978 people, 571,457 households, and 354,874 families residing in the county. The population density was 3,040 people per square mile (1,174/km²). There were 616,903 housing units at an average density of 1,346 per square mile (520/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 67.35% White, 27.45% African American, 0.18% Native American, 1.81% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 1.50% from other races, and 1.68% from two or more races. 3.38% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 12.3% were of German, 9.1% Irish, 8.7% Italian and 7.3% Polish ancestry according to Census 2000. 89.0% spoke English and 3.2% Spanish as their first language.

There were 571,457 households out of which 28.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.40% were married couples living together, 15.70% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.90% were non-families. 32.80% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the county the population was spread out with 25.00% under the age of 18, 8.00% from 18 to 24, 29.30% from 25 to 44, 22.20% from 45 to 64, and 15.60% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 89.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $39,168, and the median income for a family was $49,559. Males had a median income of $39,603 versus $28,395 for females. The per capita income for the county was $22,272. About 10.30% of families and 13.10% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.40% of those under age 18 and 9.30% of those age 65 or over.

Government

Cuyahoga County is led by the three-member Board of County Commissioners. The current members are Jimmy Dimora, Tim Hagan, and Peter Lawson Jones. However, on November 4, 2008, county voters overwhelmingly approved the adoption of a county charter form of government, which would replace the three-commissioner form of county government with an elected county executive and a 12-person county council. Summit County, Ohio (suburban Akron, Ohio) is the only other Ohio county with this form of government.

Politics

Cuyahoga County is heavily Democratic in voter registration.

Presidential election results, 1960–2008
Year Democrat Republican
2008 68.50% 441,836 30.44% 196,369
2004 66.57% 448,503 32.89% 221,600
2000 62.62% 359,913 33.42% 192,099
1996 60.75% 341,357 29.15% 163,770
1992 52.72% 337,548 29.24% 187,186
1988 58.79% 353,401 40.33% 242,439
1984 55.65% 362,626 43.60% 284,094
1980 50.02% 307,448 41.47% 254,883
1976 56.03% 349,186 41.01% 255,594
1972 48.15% 317,670 49.94% 329,493
1968 53.95% 363,540 35.44% 238,791
1964 71.50% 492,911 28.50% 196,436
1960 59.83% 429,030 40.17% 288,056

Allegations of voter fraud in 2004

It has been alleged that Cuyahoga County was the scene of widespread voter fraud during the 2004 presidential election. Investigations found that there were many voting irregularities, and that many voters were unfairly purged from voter lists or otherwise disenfranchised. Statewide, as many as 42,000 voters were unfairly disenfranchised. However, allegations that this was due to interference by Republican operatives have been disproven. A report by the Greater Cleveland Voter Registration Coalition found that nearly all problems were unintentional and were due to systemic flaws in voter registration systems.[11]

Communities

Map of Cuyahoga County, Ohio With Municipal and Township Labels

Cities

Villages

Townships

National park

The county is home to part of Cuyahoga Valley National Park, which extends southward into Summit County.

References

  1. ^ a b "Ohio County Profiles: Cuyahoga County" (PDF). Ohio Department of Development. http://www.odod.state.oh.us/research/FILES/S0/Cuyahoga.pdf. Retrieved 2007-04-28. 
  2. ^ Feran, Tom (2004-02-13). "Shooing the hog out of Cuyahoga". The Plain Dealer. http://infoweb.newsbank.com/iw-search/we/InfoWeb?p_action=doc&p_topdoc=1&p_docnum=1&p_sort=YMD_date:D&p_product=NewsBank&p_text_direct-0=document_id=(%20100B6B280DC46277%20)&p_docid=100B6B280DC46277&p_theme=aggregated5&p_queryname=100B6B280DC46277&f_openurl=yes&p_nbid=E5DN55ITMTE5OTkxMTg3NC41MzY1NTE6MToxMzo2Ni4yMTMuNDEuMTQy&&p_multi=CPDB. 
  3. ^ Feran, Tom (2006-06-02). "It's a Cleveland thing, so to speak". The Plain Dealer. http://infoweb.newsbank.com/iw-search/we/InfoWeb?p_action=doc&p_topdoc=1&p_docnum=1&p_sort=YMD_date:D&p_product=NewsBank&p_text_direct-0=document_id=(%20112043416CC2CD20%20)&p_docid=112043416CC2CD20&p_theme=aggregated5&p_queryname=112043416CC2CD20&f_openurl=yes&p_nbid=F58P50SOMTE5OTkxMjUxOS4yOTM5NjU6MToxMzo2Ni4yMTMuNDEuMTQy&&p_multi=CPDB. 
  4. ^ Siegel, Robert; Block, Melissa (2009-06-23). "Letters: Cuyahoga River". All Things Considered (National Public Radio). http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=105828999. Retrieved 2009-06-23. 
  5. ^ McIntyre, Michael K. (2009-06-28). "How to pronounce 'Cuyahoga' turns into a national debate: Tipoff". The Plain Dealer. http://www.cleveland.com/tipoff/index.ssf/2009/06/how_to_pronounce_cuyahoga_turn.html. Retrieved 2009-06-29. 
  6. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. http://www.naco.org/Template.cfm?Section=Find_a_County&Template=/cffiles/counties/usamap.cfm. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  7. ^ "Cuyahoga County data". Ohio State University Extension Data Center. http://www.osuedc.org/profiles/profile_entrance.php?fips=39035&sid=0. Retrieved 2007-04-28. 
  8. ^ "Federal Roster: Counties of Ohio, Derivation of Name and Date of Erection". http://www.sos.state.oh.us/SOS/PublicAffairs/fedRoster.aspx?Section=1585. Retrieved 2007-07-22. 
  9. ^ "Ohio Genealogy Clickable County Map". http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/oh/1/counties.htm. Retrieved 2007-07-25. 
  10. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. http://factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  11. ^ "ANALYSES OF VOTER DISQUALIFICATION,CUYAHOGA COUNTY, OHIO, NOVEMBER 2004," Greater Cleveland Voter Registration Coalition (CVRC). [1]. Retrieved October 17, 2008

External links

Coordinates: 41°32′N 81°40′W / 41.54°N 81.66°W / 41.54; -81.66


Redirecting to Cuyahoga County, Ohio


Travel guide

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikitravel

Cuyahoga County, Ohio, USA
Cuyahoga County, Ohio, USA

Cuyahoga [1] is a county in Northeast Ohio. The City of Cleveland is its County Seat and the hub a 13-county region with 4.5 million people.

  • Cleveland [2], the County Seat of Cuyahoga County, is the "Rock and Roll Capital of the World" and home to one of the five richest collections of arts and culture institutions in the US.
Map of Cleveland and suburbs
Map of Cleveland and suburbs
  • Beachwood is the cosmopolitan mecca of Cleveland's East Side, including the core of both its "Fashion District" and its "Restaurant Row"".
  • Berea is a small town on the Rocky River and home to Baldwin-Wallace College as well as the NFL Cleveland Browns Training Center.
  • Brecksville is a quaint suburb tucked into the Cuyahoga Valley National Park and Cleveland Metroparks and is situated between Cleveland and Akron.
  • Cleveland Heights, first named "Turkey Ridge", is an inner ring suburb that sits atop Cedar Hill (the last of the Allegheny foothills), overlooking University Circle and some breathtaking views of the Cleveland skyline.
Downtown Chagrin Falls
Downtown Chagrin Falls
  • Chagrin Falls, named after a French fur trader Sequin, is a charming town in suburban Cleveland, sitting atop the waterfalls of the Chagrin River.
  • Independence is the commercial mecca south of Cleveland, providing businesses accessibility to the East and West Sides of town as well as both Cleveland and Akron. It will soon be home to the NBA Cleveland Cavaliers training center.
  • Lakewood, originally named "Rockport', is the inner ring suburban home of the Gold Coast, high-rise residences lined up along Lake Erie, just west of Cleveland's Edgewater Park. It is also the most densely populated city between New York and Chicago.
  • Olmsted Falls southwest of Cleveland, is a small town sitting atop the waterfalls of the Rocky River.
  • Parma is Cleveland's largest suburb, just southwest of Cleveland. Was originally part of Parma Township. The name was taken from Parma, New York, where it was probably derived from the early-19th century fascination with classical Italy.
  • Rocky River sits on Lake Erie across from Lakewood at the mouth of the Rocky River.
  • Shaker Heights is one of America's first planned suburban communities and has served as the home of many of NEO's corporate, legal and health care leaders. It previously served as an enclave for the North Union Shaker Community.
  • Solon is a suburb to Cleveland's southeast, home of many of Northeast Ohio's Real Estate Industry elite, and noted in the original theme song from The Drew Carey Show, "let's go bowlin' in Solon".
  • Valley View
  • University Heights is home of John Carroll University on Cleveland's East Side.
  • Westlake is a suburb on Cleveland's West Side, home of Crocker Park, a upscale lifestyle center and mixed use neighborhood.

Strongsville is home to SouthPark Mall, the premier shopping center with a great all around things to do.

  • Cleveland Hopkins International Airport, CLE. Cleveland's main airport is located on the west side of the city. The airport is served by most of the major domestic airlines, and it is a hub for Continental Airlines as well.
  • Akron-Canton Regional Airport, CAK. Visitors could also use this airport which is a 45-minute drive from Cleveland.
  • Burke Lakefront Airport. A small airport right on the shore of Lake Erie that handles private jet and business traffic.
  • Cuyahoga County Airport is located in northeastern Cuyahoga County.

By car

The State of Ohio is served by the following interstate highways:

  • I-71 connects Cleveland to Medina and then runs southwest toward Columbus.
  • I-76 serving Akron and Youngstown and connecting to beyond Pennsylvania to the east.
  • I-77 starts in Cleveland and runs south through Akron, Canton, New Philadelphia and beyond.
  • I-80 is the Ohio Turnpike (a toll road) that runs across the northern part of the state, serving Cleveland, Akron and Youngstown (where I-80 and I-76 criss cross).
  • I-90 also serves the far northern part of the state, including Cleveland, Lorain, Elyria, Mentor, Painesville and Ashtabula.

By train

Cleveland is served by Amtrak with a station located on the north end of downtown (near Cleveland Browns Stadium). Unforturnately, most Amtrak routes serving Cleveland arrive and depart in the wee hours of the morning (like in the 1:00 to 4:00 a.m. time frame).

By boat

Many boaters utilize the Great Lakes, St. Lawrence Seaway and their connection points as a travel route. There are many marinas and public boat ramps available for this purpose. Also, the American Canadian Caribbean Line and the Great Lakes Cruising Companyprovide Great Lakes cruises that include Cleveland on the itineria.

  • Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority [3]

Do

A wide variety of activities await you in Northeast Ohio. Whether you are looking for outdoor fun, culture, the fine arts, history, sports, shopping, clubbing and dining - Cleveland ROCKS!

  • Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Located south of Cleveland, this park follows the course of the Cuyahoga River and the historic Ohio & Erie Canal between Cleveland and Akron. A number of older buildings are preserved here. The Cuyahoga Scenic Railroad, with train cars from the 1940s and 1950s also runs through the park. Pick up the train in Valley View near Thornburg Station (8111 Rockside Road), a mixed-use retail, restaurant and office complex sitting between the river and canal.
  • North Coast Beaches. Along the southern shore of Lake Erie are a large number of public beaches. The largest natural sand beach in Ohio, Headlands Beach State Park, is located east of Cleveland, in Mentor. Cleveland Lakefront State Park also includes a large beach at its Edgewater Park, just west of downtown Cleveland. Many other beaches are available throughout Northeast Ohio, including Huntington Beach, Euclid Beach and Fairport Harbor.
  • Lake Erie Islands. Located west of Cleveland, a group of picturesque and festive islands in Lake Erie are accessible via ferry. In addition to several[4] Ohio State Parks] located on the islands, there is plenty to do including wineries, restaurants, bars, marinas and beaches.
  • Baldwin-Wallace College, Berea
  • Capital University, Cleveland Center
  • Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland (University Circle)
  • Cleveland College of Jewish Studies, Beachwood
  • Cleveland Institute of Art, Cleveland (University Circle)
  • Cleveland State University, Cleveland
  • Cuyahoga Community College, Cleveland, Parma and Warrensville Heights campuses
  • David N. Myers College, Cleveland
  • John Carroll University, University Heights
  • Notre Dame College of Ohio, South Euclid
  • Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine, Cleveland
  • Ursuline College, Pepper Pike

Work

Enjoy your visit, but you'll probably want to stay. Greater Cleveland today is a global corporate center where national and international corporations grow and develop from the area’s strong, diversified economy. Poised as the leading center of commerce between New York City and Chicago, Greater Cleveland has been ranked by Fortune magazine as the sixth best location in North America to conduct business. Five major industries have evolved to become the economic strength of the region: Health & Medicine, Science & Engineering, Biotechnology & Biomedical, Manufacturing and Education.

Fifteen companies headquartered in Cuyahoga County are on Fortunes 2008 list of the top 1000 U.S. corporations. More than 37% of the Fortune 500 companies are present in Greater Cleveland through corporate headquarters, major divisions, subsidiaries and sales offices. Cleveland is headquarters to 113 companies with revenues of $100 million or more and more than 150 international companies have a presence here.

Cuyahoga County has a diverse mix of business activity, including the following Fortune 1000 Company Headquarters (according to the 2008 list):

  • 175 Progressive Corporation, Mayfield Heights - Insurance
  • 207 Eaton Corporation, Cleveland - Motor Vehicle/Parts
  • 226 National City Corporation, Cleveland - Banking
  • 247 Parker-Hannifin Corporation, Cleveland - Aerospace
  • 316 Sherwin Williams Company, Cleveland - Paint and Coatings
  • 321 KeyCorp, Cleveland - Banking
  • 376 Aleris International, Beachwood - Metals
  • 395 TravelCenters of America, Westlake - Highway Retail
  • 591 Nacco Industries, Cleveland - Industrial Equipment
  • 807 Medical Mutual of Ohio, Cleveland - Health Insurance
  • 820 Lincoln Electric, Cleveland - Arc Welding Equipment
  • 822 Cleveland-Cliffs, Cleveland - Mining & Crude Oil
  • 836 Ferro, Cleveland - Chemicals
  • 895 Applied Industrial Technologies, Cleveland - Bearings
  • 957 American Greetings, Cleveland - Greeting Cards
  • Tower City Center, a large urban complex, a retail mall, Ritz Carlton and Renaissance hotels, the hub of the RTA (Greater Cleveland Regional Transportation Authority) rail system and the Terminal Tower.
  • The Galleria at Erieview is another downtown complex that includes a popular lunchtime foodcourt serving the Financial District.
  • Beachwood Place, an upscale enclosed shopping mall located at the southeast corner of Cedar and Richmond Rds in the Fashion District in Beachwood.
  • Chagrin Falls, a quaint Western Reserve style downtown with the Chagrin River (and Falls) running through it.
  • Coventry District, a hip and eclectic bohemian neighborhood in Cleveland Heights.
  • Eton Collection, on Chagrin Boulevard in Woodmere, provides upscale options for shopping and dining.
  • La Place, upscale retail and dining options located at the southeast corner of Cedar and Richmond Roads in the Fashion District in Beachwood.
  • Legacy Village, a lifestyle center located at the northwest corner of Cedar and Richmond Roads in the Fashion District in Lyndhurst.
  • Shaker Commons, a renovated retail district located along Chagrin Boulevard between Lee and Avalon Roads, serving as the town center of Greater Cleveland's most prestigious address, Shaker Heights.
  • Shaker Square, a turn-of-the-century mixed use urban center located at the secondary hub of RTA's light rail system in Cleveland along the western border of Shaker Heights.
  • Uptown Solon, located in Cleveland Magazine's multi-year recipient of the "Best Suburb" selection.
  • Berea, college town, home to Baldwin-Wallace College.
  • Crocker Park provides a mixed-use "new town" environment with upscale shopping in Westlake.
  • Great Northern Mall in North Olmsted.
  • Westgate in Rocky River.
  • Little Italy, old world meets new, where this ethnically cultured neighorhood sits on the doorstep of Cleveland's University Circle.
  • Ohio City, home of the West Side Market, a neighborhood enriched by Italianate and Victorian architecture and breathtaking views of Downtown Cleveland.
  • Tremont, a neighborhood pioneered by Cleveland's art community has evolved into a diverse young professional community.
  • Convention & Visitors Bureau of Greater Cleveland, 50 Public Square, 3100 Terminal Tower, Hotline 800-321-1004, 216 621-4110, 800 321-1001, Main fax: 216 621-5967, Tourism fax: 216 623-4499, Housing fax 216 623-4495, cvb@travelcleveland.com, [5].
  • Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Located south of Cleveland, this park follows the course of the Cuyahoga River and the historic Ohio & Erie Canal between Cleveland and Akron. A number of older buildings are preserved here. The Cuyahoga Scenic Railroad, with train cars from the 1940s and 1950s also runs through the park. Pick up the train in Valley View near Thornburg Station (8111 Rockside Road), a mixed-use retail, restaurant and office complex sitting between the river and canal.
  • North Coast Beaches. Along the southern shore of Lake Erie are a large number of public beaches. The largest natural sand beach in Ohio, Headlands Beach State Park, is located east of Cleveland, in Mentor. Cleveland Lakefront State Park also includes a large beach at its Edgewater Park, just west of downtown Cleveland. Many other beaches are available throughout Northeast Ohio, including Huntington Beach, Euclid Beach and Fairport Harbor.
  • Lake Erie Islands. Located west of Cleveland, a group of picturesque and festive islands in Lake Erie are accessible via ferry. In addition to several Ohio State Parks located on the islands, there is plenty to do including wineries, restaurants, bars, marinas and beaches.
  • Hall of Fame Cycle. Tourists can plan visits to the Rock Hall, Inventure Place (the National Inventors Hall of Fame in Akron) and the Pro Football Hall of Fame (in Canton).
This is a usable article. It gives a good overview of the region, its sights, and how to get in, as well as links to the main destinations, whose articles are similarly well developed. An adventurous person could use this article, but please plunge forward and help it grow!

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