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Cycle time variation is a proven metric and philosophy for continuous improvement with the aim of driving down the deviations in the time it takes to produce successive units on a production line.[1] It supports organizations' application of lean manufacturing or lean production by eliminating wasteful expenditure of resources. It is distinguished from some of the more common applications by its different focus of creating a structure for progressively reducing the sources of internal variation that leads to workarounds and disruption causing these wastes to accumulate in the first place. Although it is often used as an indicator of lean progress, its use promotes a structured approach to reducing disruption that impacts efficiency, quality, and value.[2]

Contents

Background

Cycle time variation as a lean manufacturing metric and structure for improvment has its roots in a global study of lean manufacturing in the aerospace industry aimed at understanding how to break its cycle of cost escalation that was making new products unaffordable. These results were described in a report to the Joint Strike Fighter Program, and later in the Shingo Prize winning book, Breaking the Cost Barrier.[2] This study showed that directly targeting “waste” reduction as the focal point for lean manufacturing programs does not lead to significant cost savings. Instead, it provided strong evidence that emphasis should be placed on applying lean principles to mitigate the effects of variation that causes workarounds. For instance, high variation in the time it takes to produce successive units creates challenges in providing supplies, labor, etc. in time to support production needs. Addressing this "cycle time" variation was critical to preventing "waste" from accumulating (overcoming much of the need for the buffered schedules, inventories, and workarounds that often are viewed as waste).[2]

Major aerospace companies subsequently applied this focus on reducing cycle time variation as a central aspect of their "lean" process improvement programs.[3] Other sources cited this book and the general application of "deviation management" as an approach stemming from cycle time variation.[4] Independent research of the aerospace industry showed that firms had embraced the methodology that accompanied this as "...one of the most prominent approaches to transforming and improving military enterprise performance."[5]

Overview

The application of cycle time variation as a core area of focus for lean transformation efforts was subsequently expanded to describe the disruption caused by variation in flow from changing business conditions (such as an economic downturn), demonstrating that the disruption this causes creates skyrocketing "loss" as described by the Taguchi Loss Function. It led to a different approach to implementing lean manufacturing known as Lean Dynamics, focused on addressing the disruption caused by dynamic business conditions that often causes "waste" to accumulate. A lean dynamics approach restructures the way operations, organizations, information, and innovation are structured to overcome this.[6]

Cycle time variation is important for reinforcing the concept of dealing with variation to flow as a central focus in implementing lean manufacturing. This emphasis has made it an important building block to the Six Sigma movement, driving an improved understanding of the common focus of two areas that were previously viewed as having separate objectives.

See also

The topics below are linked to this subject:

Terminology

References

  1. ^ Schonberger, Richard J. (2001). Let's Fix It!. Free Press. ISBN 0-7432-1551-6
  2. ^ a b c Ruffa, Stephen A.; Michael J. Perozzello (2000). Breaking the Cost Barrier: A Proven Approach to Managing and Implementing Lean Manufacturing. John Wiley & Sons. ISBN 0-471-38136-5.
  3. ^ Boeing Measures Revamped Facilities Organization Statistician Guides New Metrics Program
  4. ^ Schonberger, Richard J. (2007). Best Practices in Lean Six Sigma. John Wiley & Sons
  5. ^ Mathaisel, Dennis F. X. (2007). Sustaining the Military Enterprise: An Architecture for a Lean Transformation. Auerbach.
  6. ^ Ruffa, Stephen A. (2008). Going Lean: How the Best Companies Apply Lean Manufacturing Principles to Shatter Uncertainty, Drive Innovation, and Maximize Profits. AMACOM (American Management Association)
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Cycle time variation is a proven metric and philosophy for continuous improvement with the aim of driving down the deviations in the time it takes to produce successive units on a production line.[1] It supports organizations' application of lean manufacturing or lean production by eliminating wasteful expenditure of resources. It is distinguished from some of the more common applications by its different focus of creating a structure for progressively reducing the sources of internal variation that leads to workarounds and disruption causing these wastes to accumulate in the first place. Although it is often used as an indicator of lean progress, its use promotes a structured approach to reducing disruption that impacts efficiency, quality, and value.[2]

Contents

Background

Cycle time variation as a lean manufacturing metric and structure for improvement has its roots in a global study of lean manufacturing in the aerospace industry aimed at understanding how to break its cycle of cost escalation that was making new products unaffordable. These results were described in a report to the Joint Strike Fighter Program, and later in the Shingo Prize winning book, Breaking the Cost Barrier.[2] This study showed that directly targeting “waste” reduction as the focal point for lean manufacturing programs does not lead to significant cost savings. Instead, it provided strong evidence that emphasis should be placed on applying lean principles to mitigate the effects of variation that causes workarounds. For instance, high variation in the time it takes to produce successive units creates challenges in providing supplies, labor, etc. in time to support production needs. Addressing this "cycle time" variation was critical to preventing "waste" from accumulating (overcoming much of the need for the buffered schedules, inventories, and workarounds that often are viewed as waste).[2]

Major aerospace companies subsequently applied this focus on reducing cycle time variation as a central aspect of their "lean" process improvement programs.[3] Other sources cited this book and the general application of "deviation management" as an approach stemming from cycle time variation.[4] Independent research of the aerospace industry showed that firms had embraced the methodology that accompanied this as "...one of the most prominent approaches to transforming and improving military enterprise performance."[5]

Overview

The application of cycle time variation as a core area of focus for lean transformation efforts was subsequently expanded to describe the disruption caused by variation in flow from changing business conditions (such as an economic downturn), demonstrating that the disruption this causes creates skyrocketing "loss" as described by the Taguchi Loss Function. It led to a different approach to implementing lean manufacturing known as Lean Dynamics, focused on addressing the disruption caused by dynamic business conditions that often causes "waste" to accumulate. A lean dynamics approach restructures the way operations, organizations, information, and innovation are structured to overcome this.[6]

Cycle time variation is important for reinforcing the concept of dealing with variation to flow as a central focus in implementing lean manufacturing. This emphasis has made it an important building block to the Six Sigma movement, driving an improved understanding of the common focus of two areas that were previously viewed as having separate objectives.

See also

The topics below are linked to this subject:

Terminology

References

  1. ^ Schonberger, Richard J. (2001). Let's Fix It!. Free Press. ISBN 0-7432-1551-6
  2. ^ a b c Ruffa, Stephen A.; Michael J. Perozzello (2000). Breaking the Cost Barrier: A Proven Approach to Managing and Implementing Lean Manufacturing. John Wiley & Sons. ISBN 0-471-38136-5.
  3. ^ Boeing Measures Revamped Facilities Organization Statistician Guides New Metrics Program
  4. ^ Schonberger, Richard J. (2007). Best Practices in Lean Six Sigma. John Wiley & Sons
  5. ^ Mathaisel, Dennis F. X. (2007). Sustaining the Military Enterprise: An Architecture for a Lean Transformation. Auerbach.
  6. ^ Ruffa, Stephen A. (2008). Going Lean: How the Best Companies Apply Lean Manufacturing Principles to Shatter Uncertainty, Drive Innovation, and Maximize Profits. AMACOM (American Management Association)

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