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The 1990-1995 Southern Hemisphere tropical cyclone seasons ran year-round from 1 July to 30 June during each year between 1990 and 1995. Tropical cyclone activity in the Southern Hemisphere reaches its peak from mid-February to early March.

Contents

1990–91 Southern Hemisphere tropical cyclone season

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Tropical Cyclone Joy

Storm path

Beginning 24 December 1990, the outer bands of Cyclone Joy reached Queensland, Australia. The storm killed 5 people and caused extensive flooding. Joy reached Category 4 intensity off the coast of Cairns on the 24th of December 1990, before crossing the coast to the North of Townsville, on 26 December 1990[1] The remnants of Joy created a convergence zone along the central Queensland coast, with many locations around the Mackay region recording over 2000mm of rain during the following week.

Tropical Cyclone Fifi

Storm path

A severe cyclone, Fifi struck Western Australia in mid April 1991. The storm killed 27 people and left 100,000 homes without power. [2]

Tropical Cyclone Errol

Storm path

Cyclone Errol formed on 25 March 1991 and never hit land. The storm was responsible for a sinking of an Indonesian fishing boat. [3]

Angola Tropical Cyclone of 1991

A possible tropical storm formed in the South Atlantic on 10 April 1991. The tropical storm moved southwestward and dissipated on the 15th.

Tropical Cyclone Sina

Storm path

24 to 29 November 1990, Pacific Ocean. Sina was the only named storm to form in the South Pacific this year.[1]

Tropical Storm Laurence

  • Laurence, 15 to 16 December 1990, Timor Sea

Tropical Cyclone Alison

Storm path

12 to 18 January 1991, Indian Ocean

Hurricane Bella

Storm path
  • Bella, 20 January to 4 February, Category 5 in the Indian Ocean

Tropical Storm Chris

Storm path
  • Chris, 16 to 23 February 1991, off Western Australia

Tropical Storm Cynthia

Storm path
  • Cynthia, 16 to 17 February 1991, near Madagascar

Tropical Storm Daphne

Storm path
  • Daphne, 15 to 27 February 1991, Pacific Ocean, then crossed Australia to Indian Ocean

Hurricane Debra

Storm path
  • Debra, 24 February to 4 March 1991, near Madagascar

Tropical Storm Kelvin

Storm path
  • Kelvin, 25 February to 6 March 1991, Pacific Ocean

Tropical Storm Elma

Storm path
  • Elma, 27 February to 3 March 1991, Indian Ocean

Hurricane Fatima

Storm path
  • Fatima, 22 March to 1 April 1991, Indian Ocean

Hurricane Marian

Storm path
  • Marian, 10 to 19 April 1991, off Western Australia

Tropical Cyclone Lisa

Storm path
  • Lisa, 7 to 12 May 1991, Pacific Ocean

Tropical Storm Gritelle

Storm path
  • Gritelle, 8 to 12 June 1991, Indian Ocean

1991–92 Southern Hemisphere tropical cyclone season

Tropical Cyclone Val

Storm path

Cyclone Val was a Category 5 cyclone that hit Samoa in December 1991. It formed on 5 December and dissipated on 13 December in the Pacific Ocean. The cyclone raged for approximately four days and severely stripped 90% of the island, causing 13 deaths and destroying about half of the island's coconut trees, resulting in a tremendous blow to the country's economy.

Tropical Cyclone Fran

Storm path

While out at sea, Fran reached the powerful Category 5 equivalent on the Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Scale. Eventually, as a Category 2 system, Fran crossed the coast near 1770, Queensland on 16 March 1992. Having crossed the coast a first time, Fran turned to the south-east and crossed the coast again, at Fraser Island, before heading back out to sea. The cyclone damaged houses in Bundaberg and extensively damaged a marina complex at Burnett Heads. The Kolan and Burnett rivers suffered major flooding. No deaths were attributed to this cyclone.

Tropical Cyclone Ian

Storm path

A Category 4 stuck Western Australia in March 1992 causing minimal damage. [4]

Tropical Cyclone Neville

Storm path

Struck Tiwi Islands in April 1992 leaving only minor damage. [5]

Other tropical cyclones

The following tropical cyclones also occurred within the 1991-1992 Southern Hemisphere tropical cyclone season: [6]

Storm path
  • Tia, 15 to 21 November 1991, Pacific Ocean
Storm path
  • Graham, 2 to 10 December 1991, Indian Ocean
Storm path
  • Wasa, 5 to 13 December 1991, Pacific Ocean
Storm path
  • Arthur, 15 to 17 December 1991, Pacific Ocean
Storm path
  • Alexandra, 20 to 25 December 1991, Indian Ocean
Storm path
  • Bryna, 30 December 1991 to 2 January 1992, crossed Madagascar
Storm path
  • Betsy, 6 to 15 January 1992, Pacific Ocean
  • Mark, 8 to 10 January 1992, Gulf of Carpentaria
Storm path
  • Cliff, 6 to 9 February 1992, Pacific Ocean
Storm path
  • Celesta, 11 to 13 February 1992, Indian Ocean
Storm path
  • Daman, 14 to 19 February 1992, Pacific Ocean
Storm path
  • Davilia, 23 to 24 February 1992, Indian Ocean
Storm path
  • Harriet, 26 February to 8 March 1992, Indian Ocean
Storm path
  • Esau, 26 February to 6 March 1992, Category 5 in Pacific Ocean
Storm path
  • Farida, 26 February to 3 March 1992, Indian Ocean
Storm path
  • Gerda, 27 to 28 February, Indian Ocean
Storm path
  • Gene, 15 to 19 March 1992, Pacific Ocean
Storm path
  • Hettie, 25 to 29 March 1992, Pacific Ocean
Storm path
  • Jane/Irna, 8 to 18 April 1992, Indian Ocean
Storm path
  • Innis, 28 April to 2 May 1992, Pacific Ocean

1992–93 Southern Hemisphere tropical cyclone season

Tropical Cyclone Nina

Storm path

Nina formed on December 23, 1992, the storm reached Category 1 status before making landfall in northern Queensland, then Nina moved eastward, reaching Category 3 status before becoming extratropical on January 2, 1993. [7]

Tropical Cyclone Kina

Storm path

Formed on 26 December 1992 over the Pacific Ocean, south of Fiji's main Island, Viti Levu. Tracked towards the capital, Suva, where it caused significant damage and reports of causualties[8]. The main bridge and secondary bridge to the international airport at Nadi collapsed and subsequently delayed the evacuation of tourists from the island, with emergency ferry services forced to ferry passengers from buses waiting on either side of the river bank.

Tropical Cyclone Adel

Storm path

Adel lasted from 13-16 May 1993. During its life, it passed over Bougainville Island and near Goodenough Island, leaving two drowned and a total of at least 15 missing. Leaves were blown from trees, and 345 houses were destroyed, along with a radio tower that was bent over.[9]

Other tropical cyclones

The following tropical cyclones also occurred within the 1992-1993 Southern Hemisphere tropical cyclone season: [10]

Storm path
  • Aviona, 27 September to 1 October 1992, Indian Ocean
Storm path
  • Babie, 18 to 21 October 1992, Indian Ocean
Storm path
  • Joni, 6 to 12 December 1992, Pacific Ocean
Storm path
  • Ken, 19 to 23 December 1992, Indian Ocean
Storm path
  • Colina, 14 to 21 January 1993, Indian Ocean
Storm path
  • Dessilia, 20 to 21 January 1993, crossed Madagascar
Storm path
  • Edwina, 20 to 29 January 1993, Indian Ocean
Storm path
  • Lena, 24 to 29 January 1993, off Western Australia
Storm path
  • Lin, 31 January to 4 February 1993, Pacific Ocean
Storm path
  • Oliver, 4 to 12 February 1993, off Queensland
Storm path
  • Mick, 5 to 9 February 1993, Pacific Ocean
Storm path
  • Nisha, 12 to 16 February 1993, Pacific Ocean
Storm path
  • Finella, 13 to 15 February 1993, near Madagascar
Storm path
  • Oli, 16 to 18 February 1993, Pacific Ocean
Storm path
  • Polly, 25 February to 3 March 1993, Pacific Ocean
Storm path
  • Roger, 12 to 18 March 1993, Pacific Ocean
Storm path
  • Prema, 27 March to 1 April 1993, Pacific Ocean
Storm path
  • Jourdanne, 3 to 9 April 1993, Indian Ocean
Storm path
  • Monty, 10 to 12 April 1993, near Western Australia
Storm path
  • Konita, 2 to 7 May 1993, Indian Ocean

1993–94 Southern Hemisphere tropical cyclone season

Tropical Cyclone Naomi

Storm path

Naomi was the first cyclone of the 1993/94 season. Forming early on 16 December 1993, the storm moved south and strengthened into a Category 3 before making landfall. There was moderate damage and a fishing boat was disabled during the storm. There were no deaths.[11]

Tropical Cyclone Oscar

Storm path

Cyclone Oscar was a weak system, and only barely reached cyclone strength on 3 January 1994 for about a 12 hour period. It moved on a generally westsouthwest course parallel to the Kimberley and Pilbara coasts. [12]

Tropical Cyclone Pearl

Storm path

Tropical Cyclone Pearl developed off the northwest Kimberley coast on 11 January 1994 and moved westwards as a very small but severe Category 3 cyclone covering a distance of more than 4000 km, before finally dissipating in the Central Indian Ocean on the 22nd. [13]

Tropical Cyclone Quenton

Storm path

Tropical Cyclone Quenton began as a tropical low to the east of Christmas Island on 23 January 1994. The low moved slowly west, then on 25 January intensified to cyclone strength and moved southward across the Indian Ocean. By early on the 27th the cyclone had dissipated. [14]

Tropical Cyclone Sharon

Tropical Cyclone Sharon was the most intense cyclone in the Western Australian region during the 1993/94 season. It formed about 1100 km north of Northwest Cape on 13 March 1994, then rapidly intensified during the 14th while moving on a southsouthwest path towards the west Pilbara coast. During the 16th the cyclone rapidly weakened due to movement into a region of strong westerly wind shear. Cyclone warnings were issued for the west Pilbara and upper west coast on the 16th but were cancelled on the morning of the 17th Continued shearing and subsequent movement over cooler waters weakened the storm to below cyclone strength by the morning of the 18th. [15]

Tropical Cyclone Tim

Tropical Cyclone Tim was a very small weak system that moved on a generally westward path from south of Sumatra to the Cocos Islands from 30 March to 1 April 1994. It passed about 100 km to the south of Christmas Island but its effects, other than a wind shift, were barely recognisable on the Island. [16]

Tropical Cyclone Vivienne

Storm path

Tropical Cyclone Vivienne formed from a tropical low that had moved westward across the Timor Sea. It intensified rapidly during the afternoon and night of 7 April 1994, reaching maximum intensity on 8 April when it was located 550 km to the northnorthwest of Broome. Its development from here on was hampered by vertical wind shear and Vivienne moved on a generally westsouthwest path parallel to, but well offshore from, the Western Australian coastline. It dissipated on 11 April and no watches or warnings were issued. [17]

Tropical Cyclone Willy

Storm path

Willy was a Category 1 cyclone lasting from 28 to 30 April 1994 that passed about 80 km west of the Cocos Islands. [18]

Tropical Cyclone Rewa

Storm path

Cyclone Rewa formed on 26 December 1993. It looped around the Coral Sea for almost a month, crossed New Caledonia and the Solomon Island, and dissipated on 21 January. Rewa was the longest-lived South Pacific tropical cyclone on record, lasting 25 days, from 26 December to 21 January.

Intense Tropical Cyclone Geralda

Intense tropical cyclone (MFR)
Category 5 tropical cyclone (SSHS)
Duration 26 January – 5 February
Intensity 205 km/h (125 mph) (10-min), 905 hPa (mbar)

Part of a spree of four powerful cyclones to impact Madagascar this year, Geralda killed 200 people and left half a million homeless as it made landfall on the island in early February.

Tropical Cyclone Hollanda

Storm path

Named shortly after Geralda was dissipating, Hollanda, a category 4 cyclone was the most devastating tropical cyclone to have hit the island of Mauritius in the Indian Ocean since tropical cyclone Gervaise in 1975. The cyclone passed 10 km to the west of Mauritius on February 10, 1994. The island was seriously affected, with winds of over 160 km/h (100 mph) and torrential rains (an average of 400mm for the island). The maximum gusts speed recorded was 218 km/h when Hollanda was at its closest to the country, earning a warning cyclone class 4 (the maximum). A warning cyclone class 4 is issued by the Mauritian Meteorological Services when gusts speeds of the order of 120 km/h is being recorded on the island and is expected to continue. On the Saffir–Simpson Hurricane Scale, Hollanda reached category 4 (winds speeds of 210–249 km/h). Some sources issued that tropical cyclone Hollanda could have exceeded the gusts speed of 216 km/h and reached about 300 km/h in Port Louis due to the considerable damage caused in the northern part of the island. In the capital city, some concrete buildings were severely damaged and a construction tower crane collapsed. The Mauritius Meteorological Services rejected that Hollanda could have peak to a category 5 or a very intense tropical cyclone with gusts of 280–300 km/h. During the cyclone, three people died by a falling tree, 50% of the telephone system was down, electrical power was nearly completely out, 50% of sugar plantation was destroyed, many vegetables fields were devastated, 1500 people became homeless and concrete buildings were moderately damaged. Major roads were blocked by trees and lanslides. The estimated damaged caused by the cyclone was USD 135.4 million.[19][20][21]

Tropical Cyclone Nadia

Storm path

The last of the spree of devastating Madagascar cyclones, Nadia made landfall in Madagascar in late March. After crossing the northern tip of the island, Nadia impacted Mozambique before returning to the Mozambique channel and finally dissipating. Nadia killed dozens in Madagascar. It claimed around 200 more lives in Mozambique and left over one million people homeless.

Other tropical cyclones

The following tropical cyclones also occurred within the 1993-1994 Southern Hemisphere tropical cyclone season:

Tropical Cyclone Alexina

Storm path

Tropical Cyclone Bettina

Storm path

Tropical Cyclone Cecilia

Storm path

Tropical Cyclone Daisy

Storm path

Tropical Cyclone Edmea

Tropical Cyclone Farah

Tropical Cyclone Ivy

Storm path

Tropical Cyclone Julita

Tropical Cyclone Kelvina

Storm path

Tropical Cyclone Litanne

Storm path

Tropical Cyclone Mariola

Storm path

Tropical Cyclone Odille

Storm path

1994–95 Southern Hemisphere tropical cyclone season

Australia

Tropical Cyclone Annette

Storm path

Annette formed on 15 December 1994. The storm moved southeastward while intensifying to a Category 4 cyclone. Annette made landfall at Mandora Station on 18 December. There was considerable damage to homes and crops and about a 1,000 cattle were lost in the storm.[22]

Tropical Cyclone Bobby

Storm path

Severe Tropical Cyclone Bobby, a Category 4 cyclone with estimated winds up to 270 km/hour near the centre, crossed the Western Australian Pilbara coast to the east of Onslow between midnight and 0100 on the 25 February 1995. Seven lives were lost when two fishing trawlers were sunk off the coast from Onslow. A bulk ore carrier also ran aground in the cyclone. There was very minor property damage reported from the Karratha area and approximately 20 houses in Onslow suffered superficial roofing damage. Cyclone Bobby also brought heavy rains and extensive flooding to the south of the Pilbara area, which damaged roads, bridges and crops and seriously affected mining production. A motorist was drowned inland from Carnarvon while attempting to cross a flooded creek.[2][3][4]

Tropical Cyclone Chloe

Storm path

The third major cyclone to strike Australia. Cyclone Chloe reached Category 5 status before making landfall in the uninhabited section of the coast of the Kimberley region of Western Australia on 7 April 1995. The storm dissipated well inland.[23]

Other tropical cyclones

The following tropical cyclones also occurred within the 1994-1995 Southern Hemisphere tropical cyclone season: [24]

Storm path
  • Vania, 13 to 17 November 1994, Pacific Ocean
Storm path
  • William, 31 December 1994 to 3 January 1995, Pacific Ocean
Storm path
  • Violet, 3 to 7 March 1995, Category 5 in Pacific Ocean
Storm path
  • Warren, 5 to 6 March 1995, Gulf of Carpentaria
Storm path
  • Agnes, 17 to 22 April 1995, Category 3 near Cape York, Queensland

South-West Indian Ocean

Intense Tropical Cyclone Albertine

Intense tropical cyclone (MFR)
Category 4 tropical cyclone (SSHS)
Duration 21 November – 3 December
Intensity 175 km/h (110 mph) (10-min), 925 hPa (mbar)

Moderate Tropical Storm Bentha

Moderate tropical storm (MFR)
Tropical storm (SSHS)
Duration 3 January – 6 January
Intensity 85 km/h (50 mph) (10-min), 984 hPa (mbar)

Moderate Tropical Storm Christelle

Moderate tropical storm (MFR)
Tropical storm (SSHS)
Duration 6 January – 9 January
Intensity 85 km/h (50 mph) (10-min), 980 hPa (mbar)

Intense Tropical Cyclone Dorina

Intense tropical cyclone (MFR)
Category 3 tropical cyclone (SSHS)
Duration 20 January – 29 January
Intensity 175 km/h (110 mph) (10-min), 925 hPa (mbar)

Severe Tropical Storm Fodah

Severe tropical storm (MFR)
Tropical storm (SSHS)
Duration 24 January – 26 January
Intensity 100 km/h (65 mph) (10-min), 970 hPa (mbar)

Tropical Cyclone Gail

Tropical cyclone (MFR)
Category 1 tropical cyclone (SSHS)
Duration 5 February – 11 February
Intensity 140 km/h (85 mph) (10-min), 975 hPa (mbar)

Moderate Tropical Storm Heida

Moderate tropical storm (MFR)
Tropical storm (SSHS)
Duration 5 February – 7 February
Intensity 75 km/h (45 mph) (10-min), 990 hPa (mbar)

Tropical Cyclone Ingrid

Tropical cyclone (MFR)
Category 3 tropical cyclone (SSHS)
Duration 24 February – 1 March
Intensity 150 km/h (90 mph) (10-min), 945 hPa (mbar)

Severe Tropical Storm Josta

Severe tropical storm (MFR)
Category 1 tropical cyclone (SSHS)
Duration 7 March – 12 March
Intensity 105 km/h (65 mph) (10-min), 972 hPa (mbar)

Moderate Tropical Storm Kylie

Moderate tropical storm (MFR)
Category 2 tropical cyclone (SSHS)
Duration 7 March – 12 March
Intensity 85 km/h (50 mph) (10-min), 984 hPa (mbar)

Tropical Depression Lidy

Tropical depression (MFR)
Clockwise vortex
Duration 14 March – 20 March
Intensity 55 km/h (35 mph) (10-min), 996 hPa (mbar)

Intense Tropical Cyclone Marlene

Intense tropical cyclone (MFR)
Category 4 tropical cyclone (SSHS)
Duration 30 March – 10 April
Intensity 185 km/h (115 mph) (10-min), 920 hPa (mbar)

See also

References

External links


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