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Cypress Mountain Ski Area
CypressMtnlogo.svg
Cypress-foggy.jpg
Skiers at Cypress Mountain
Location: Cypress Provincial Park,
British Columbia
 Canada
Nearest city: West Vancouver
Coordinates: 49°23′44″N 123°12′12″W / 49.39556°N 123.20333°W / 49.39556; -123.20333 (Cypress Mountain Ski Area)
Vertical: 610 m / 2001 ft
Top elevation: 1440 m / 4724 ft
Base elevation: 910 m / 2985 ft
Runs: 53
Beginner 13%
Intermediate 35%
Advanced 37%
Expert 8%
Freestyle Terrain 8%
Longest run: 4.1 km (combination)
(2.5 mi.)
Lift system: 6 chairlifts
1 magic carpet
2 surface lifts
Snowfall: 622 cm/year (245")
Web site: Cypress Mountain

Cypress Mountain is a ski area in West Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, located in the southern section of Cypress Provincial Park.

The ski resort is a 30[1] minute drive north of Vancouver, and has 47 named alpine ski runs (many accessible for night skiing) and 19 km cross country tracks. Snowshoeing tours are also popular. Ski schools and rentals, cafeteria and lounge and a retail shop are also located on the premises. In summer the ski area is shut down, but there are many hiking trails in the park.

Cypress Bowl hosted several events of the 2010 Winter Olympics.

The ski area's downhill runs are built on two mountains (Mt. Strachan (prounounced "Strawn".[2] - 1440 m (4724 ft.) and Black Mountain - 1200 m (3937 ft.), on a vertical rise of 610 m (2001 ft.).

The ski resort name Cypress Mountain is derived from the name of the bowl between the two mountains - "Cypress Bowl", which was the original and still used common name of the resort (which is owned by Cypress Bowl Recreations Ltd.). The term "Cypress" comes from the Yellow Cedar tree Chamaecyparis nootkatensis which is common in the park at altitudes over 800 metres, and is also known as Yellow Cypress, as well as from the name of the park in which the resort lies.

Despite the resort name, there is in fact no Cypress Mountain in the immediate vicinity (there is a Cypress Mountain in the Vancouver area, located 24 km east, in Coquitlam just southwest of the south end of Coquitlam Lake.[3]

Contents

Amenities

Cypress Bowl Ski Area has two high-speed detachable quad chairlifts (Eagle Express and the Lions Express), two fixed-grip quad chairs (Raven Ridge and Easy Rider) and two double chairlifts (Sky Chair and Midway).[4] There was a rope tow until 2002, when it was replaced by the Easy Rider Chair. The original Sunrise chairlift was dismantled in the summer of 2007 and moved to the expansion area on Black Mountain in time for the 2007-08 season, where it is now known as the Raven Ridge Quad Chair. The new high-speed chair (The Lions Express) was also constructed in 2007 on Mount Strachan by Doppelmayr[5]. A new base lodge, completed in late 2008, is a more convenient location near the base of the Eagle Express and Lions Express chairlifts.

2010 Winter Olympics

During the Vancouver 2010 Olympic Winter Games, Cypress hosted all of the freestyle skiing and snowboarding competitions (moguls, aerials, ski cross, half-pipe, snowboard cross and parallel giant slalom). The half-pipe and the venues for the moguls and aerials were completed in the summer of 2007.

Despite being the Official Freestyle Venue of the Vancouver 2010 Olympic Winter Games, Cypress Bowl Ski Area will not have any freestyle terrain or features for the 2009-10 ski season. Due to warm conditions (the warmest January on record)[6] and rainfall, VANOC organizers started to truck in snow from other parts of the mountain.[7] Snow was later brought by helicopters to maintain the terrain and features, and dry ice was used to prevent melting.[6][8]

See also

References

  1. ^ http://cypressmountain.com/information
  2. ^ Fairley, Climbing & Hiking in Southwestern British Columbia, p. 23.
  3. ^ Cypress Mountain (mountain) in the BC Geographical Names Information System 49°19′53″N 122°48′22″W / 49.33139°N 122.80611°W / 49.33139; -122.80611 (Cypress Mountain)
  4. ^ Cypress Mountain
  5. ^ http://www.doppelmayr.com/upload/prj1/Inserate-Broschueren/annual2008_englisch_web.pdf
  6. ^ a b Corder, Mike (2010-02-09). "Helicopters and trucks bring snow to Cypress". The Associated Press. Archived from the original on 2010-02-25. http://www.webcitation.org/5noOk3JOs. Retrieved 2010-02-25. 
  7. ^ "http://www.cbc.ca/canada/british-columbia/story/2010/01/20/bc-cypress-mountain-no-snow.html". CBC News. 18 January 2010. http://www.cbc.ca/canada/british-columbia/story/2010/01/20/bc-cypress-mountain-no-snow.html. Retrieved 2010-01-20. 
  8. ^ Mick, Harvey (2010-02-10). "Cooked-contraption keeps Cypress snow cool". The Globe and Mail. Archived from the original on 2010-02-25. http://www.webcitation.org/5noOjPD8J. Retrieved 2010-02-25. 
  • Fairley, Bruce (1986). A Guide to Climbing and Hiking in Southwestern British Columbia. Vancouver, BC: Gordon Soules Book Publishers Ltd.. ISBN 0-919574-99-8. 

External links

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