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Cyril J. O'Regan, an Irish-born Roman Catholic intellectual, is the Catherine F. Huisking Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame. He is best known for his multi-volume gnosticism series, including Gnostic Return in Modernity and Gnostic Apocalypse: Jacob Boehme's Haunted Narrative. Rehabilitating a project attempted in the nineteenth century by a leader of the Tübingen school of theology, Ferdinand Christian Baur, O'Regan attempts to identify a gnostic structure or "grammar" that can be traced through sources and authors as diverse as Valentinianism and William Blake.[1] By identifying this grammar, he hoped to find a way to distinguish works of gnosticism from other types with superficial resemblances, such as writings in neoplatonism. As a Christian theologian, he also hopes to equip theologians to avoid gnosticism, which he sees as an alternative contrary to genuine Christian faith yet, by its nature, one that is present in every era. This project is in some ways similar to that of Eric Voegelin, who in his Science, Politics and Gnosticism attempted to identify some core features of gnosticism that he viewed as dangerous, though the two thinkers disagree about how to define gnosticism and why it should be rejected.

In advocating for new ways of recognizing gnosticism, O'Regan draws on categories such as metalepsis that he developed in his earlier work, The Heterodox Hegel.

Notes

  1. ^ Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews May 1, 2001

Bibliography

  • O'Regan, Cyril, Gnostic Return in Modernity, SUNY Press, 2001.
  • O'Regan, Cyril, Gnostic Apocalypse: Jacob Boehme's Haunted Narrative", SUNY Press, 2002.

Cyril J. O'Regan, an Irish-born Roman Catholic intellectual, is the Catherine F. Huisking Professor of Theology at the University of Notre Dame. He is best known for his multi-volume gnosticism series, including Gnostic Return in Modernity and Gnostic Apocalypse: Jacob Boehme's Haunted Narrative. Rehabilitating a project attempted in the nineteenth century by a leader of the Tübingen school of theology, Ferdinand Christian Baur, O'Regan attempts to identify a gnostic structure or "grammar" that can be traced through sources and authors as diverse as Valentinianism and William Blake. By identifying this grammar, he hoped to find a way to distinguish works of gnosticism from other types with superficial resemblances, such as writings in Neoplatonism. As a Christian theologian, he also hopes to equip theologians to avoid gnosticism, which he sees as an alternative contrary to genuine Christian faith yet, by its nature, one that is present in every era. This project is in some ways similar to that of Eric Voegelin, who in his Science, Politics and Gnosticism attempted to identify some core features of gnosticism that he viewed as dangerous, though the two thinkers disagree about how to define gnosticism and why it should be rejected.[1]

In advocating for new ways of recognizing gnosticism, O'Regan draws on categories such as metalepsis that he developed in his earlier work, The Heterodox Hegel. O'Regan has also written widely, in monographs and reviews, on the concept of the apocalyptic.[2]

Notes

  1. ^ Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews May 1, 2001
  2. ^ http://itself.wordpress.com/author/jeesunautre/

Bibliography

  • O'Regan, Cyril, The Anatomy of Misremembering: Balthasar's Resistance to Heidegger and Hegel, forthcoming with Crossroad, 2011.
  • O'Regan, Cyril, Gnostic Return in Modernity, SUNY Press, 2001.
  • O'Regan, Cyril, Gnostic Apocalypse: Jacob Boehme's Haunted Narrative, SUNY Press, 2002.
  • O'Regan, Cyril, Theology and the Spaces of Apocalyptic, Marquette Unversity Press, 2009.
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