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Cover of the first edition of the publication Dada by Tristan Tzara; Zürich, 1917.
.Dada or Dadaism is a cultural movement that began in Zürich, Switzerland, during World War I and peaked from 1916 to 1922.[1] The movement primarily involved visual arts, literaturepoetry, art manifestoes, art theorytheatre, and graphic design, and concentrated its anti-war politics through a rejection of the prevailing standards in art through anti-art cultural works.^ Dada performance began in Switzerland with the opening of the Cabaret Voltaire in 1916.
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^ Dada was anti art establishment and anti art hierarchy.

^ The movement primarily involved visual arts , literature ( poetry , art manifestoes , art theory ), theatre , and graphic design , and concentrated its anti war politic through a rejection of the prevailing standards in art through anti-art cultural works.
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Its purpose was to ridicule what its participants considered to be the meaninglessness of the modern world. .In addition to being anti-war, dada was also anti-bourgeois and anarchistic in nature.^ Dada artists in New York were at a greater remove from the harsh realities of the war, and their rebellion was similarly more removed and intellectual in nature.
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^ They shared the puckish wit and delight in shocking bourgeois mores of Dada, but not its anarchist ideology.
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^ But despite, or including, its serious limitations, Dada gives an apt expression to the violent and extreme nature of the crisis of bourgeois society and culture ushered in by World War I. .
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.Dada activities included public gatherings, demonstrations, and publication of art/literary journals; passionate coverage of art, politics, and culture were topics often discussed in a variety of media.^ Dada activities included public gatherings, demonstrations, and publication of art/literary journals.
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^ Passionate coverage of art, politics, and culture filled their publications.
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^ They issued challenges to art and culture through publications such as The Blind Man , Rongwrong , and New York Dada in which they criticized the traditionalist basis for museum art.
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.The movement influenced later styles like the avant-garde and downtown music movements, and groups including surrealism, Nouveau réalisme, pop art, Fluxus and punk rock.^ The style was influenced by other genres mentioned: pop art, art nouveau, dadaism.
  • Modern Art Movements To Inspire Your Logo Design - Smashing Magazine 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.smashingmagazine.com [Source type: General]

^ The movement influenced later styles, Avant-garde and Downtown music movements, and groups including Surrealism , Nouveau Réalisme , Pop Art , Fluxus and Punk .
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^ The spirit of Dada reappeared in the 1960s in movements such as Pop Art, which are surveyed in the final section.
  • Dada Script Analysis @ Theatre with Anatoly 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC script.vtheatre.net [Source type: General]

.Dada is the groundwork to abstract art and sound poetry, a starting point for performance art, a prelude to postmodernism, an influence on pop art, a celebration of antiart to be later embraced for anarcho-political uses in the 1960s and the movement that lay the foundation for Surrealism.^ The Paris Dada movement later evolved into Surrealism by 1924.
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^ The spirit of Dada reappeared in the 1960s in movements such as Pop Art, which are surveyed in the final section.
  • Dada Script Analysis @ Theatre with Anatoly 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC script.vtheatre.net [Source type: General]

^ Dada as a movement declined in the 1920s, and some of its practitioners became prominent in other modern-art movements, notably surrealism.


—Marc Lowenthal, translator's introduction to Francis Picabia's I Am a Beautiful Monster: Poetry, Prose, And Provocation

Contents

Overview

It's too idiotic to be schizophrenic.
Carl Jung on the Dada productions.[2]
.Dada was an informal international movement, with participants in Europe and North America.^ Dada was an informal international movement, with participants in Europe and North America .
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^ But the most valuable aspect of the word of the Dada Literary Archive, the part which makes it a truly unique international resource, is the project of microfilming manuscripts and ephemera housed in public and private collections scattered throughout Europe and North America.
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^ The first is the most extensive bibliographic search ever undertaken for published material relating to the Dada movement and to the individual participants.
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.The beginnings of Dada correspond to the outbreak of World War I. For many participants, the movement was a protest against the bourgeois nationalist and colonialist interests, which many Dadaists believed were the root cause of the war, and against the cultural and intellectual conformity—in art and more broadly in society—that corresponded to the war.^ The beginnings of Dada were not the beginnings of an art, but of a disgust.

^ "The beginnings of Dada were not the beginnings of art, but of disgust."
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^ Dada was a protest by a group of European artists against World War I, bourgeois society, and the conservativism of traditional thought.
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[3]
Hannah Höch, Cut with the Dada Kitchen Knife through the Last Weimar Beer-Belly Cultural Epoch in Germany, 1919, collage of pasted papers, 90x144 cm, Staatliche Museum, Berlin.
.Many Dadaists believed that the 'reason' and 'logic' of bourgeois capitalist society had led people into war.^ Many Dadaists believed that the 'reason' and 'logic' of bourgeois capitalist society had led people into war.
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^ The Cabaret Voltaire fell into disrepair until it was occupied from January to March, 2002, by a group proclaiming themselves neo-Dadaists , led by Mark Divo .
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^ The beginnings of Dada correspond to the outbreak of World War I. For many participants, the movement was a protest against the bourgeois nationalist and colonialist interests which many Dadaists believed were the root cause of the war, and against the cultural and intellectual conformity — in art and more broadly in society — that corresponded to the war.
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.They expressed their rejection of that ideology in artistic expression that appeared to reject logic and embrace chaos and irrationality.^ They expressed their rejection of that ideology in artistic expression that appeared to reject logic and embrace chaos and irrationality .
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^ Intentionally disrespectful, Duchamp's defacement was meant to express the Dadaists' rejection of both artistic and cultural authority.
  • Dada | Arts & Culture | Smithsonian Magazine 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.smithsonianmag.com [Source type: General]

For example, George Grosz later recalled that his Dadaist art was intended as a protest "against this world of mutual destruction."[4]
According to its proponents, Dada was not art, it was "anti-art." Everything for which art stood, Dada represented the opposite. .Where art was concerned with traditional aesthetics, Dada ignored aesthetics.^ Where art was concerned with traditional aesthetics , Dada ignored aesthetics.
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^ 'ART' - parrot word - replaced by DADA." Art and aesthetics are replaced with a "style of life", a new way of living.
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^ In terms of traditional art historys selective machinery of tradition Monets formalism (and the evacuation of politics) was valorised , while Dadas tactics are often presented as the antics of naughty schoolboys or ignored.

.If art was to appeal to sensibilities, Dada was intended to offend.^ If art was to appeal to sensibilities, Dada was intended to offend.
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.Through their rejection of traditional culture and aesthetics, the Dadaists hoped to destroy traditional culture and aesthetics.^ Formal Definition: A western European artistic and literary movement (1916-23) that sought the discovery of authentic reality through the abolition of traditional culture and aesthetic forms.
  • Mayor says it's time for nonsense / LJWorld.com 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www2.ljworld.com [Source type: General]

^ Intentionally disrespectful, Duchamp's defacement was meant to express the Dadaists' rejection of both artistic and cultural authority.
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  • Dada | Arts & Culture | Smithsonian Magazine 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.smithsonianmag.com [Source type: General]

.As Hugo Ball expressed it, "For us, art is not an end in itself ...^ Ball: "Art for us is an occasion for social criticism, and for a real understanding of the age we lived in.

^ The name Dada a nonsense , baby-talk word means nothingDada even denied the value of art, hence its cult of non-art, and ended by negating itself.

but it is an opportunity for the true perception and criticism of the times we live in."[5]
A reviewer from the American Art News stated at the time that "Dada philosophy is the sickest, most paralyzing and most destructive thing that has ever originated from the brain of man." Art historians have described Dada as being, in large part, a "reaction to what many of these artists saw as nothing more than an insane spectacle of collective homicide."[6]
.Years later, Dada artists described the movement as "a phenomenon bursting forth in the midst of the postwar economic and moral crisis, a savior, a monster, which would lay waste to everything in its path.^ Years later, Dada artists described the movement as "a phenomenon bursting forth in the midst of the postwar economic and moral crisis, a savior, a monster, which would lay waste to everything in its path.
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^ Dada is the groundwork to abstract art and sound poetry, a starting point for performance art, a prelude to postmodernism, an influence on pop art, a celebration of antiart to be later embraced for anarcho-political uses in the 1960s and the movement that lay the foundation for Surrealism.
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^ In February 1918, Huelsenbeck gave his first Dada speech in Berlin, and produced a Dada manifesto later in the year.
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[It was] a systematic work of destruction and demoralization... .In the end it became nothing but an act of sacrilege."^ [It was] a systematic work of destruction and demoralization...In the end it became nothing but an act of sacrilege."
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[6]

History

Origin of the word Dada

.One explanation maintains that it originates from the Romanian artists Tristan Tzara[7] and Marcel Janco's frequent use of the words da, da, which, translated into English is equivalent to yeah, yeah, as in a sarcastic or facetious yeah, right.^ Ball wanted to shock anyone, he wrote, who regarded “all this civilized carnage as a triumph of European intelligence.” One Cabaret Voltaire performer, Romanian artist Tristan Tzara, described its nightly shows as “explosions of elective imbecility.” .
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^ Dada was originated in 1916 by Tzara, the German writer Hugo Ball, the Alsatian-born artist Jean Arp, and other intellectuals living in Zurich, Switzerland.

^ The term dada, the French word for hobbyhorse, is said to have been selected at random from a dictionary by the Romanian-born poet, essayist, and editor Tristan Tzara.

(Da in Romanian strictly translates as yes.)
.Another theory is a group of artists assembled in Zürich in 1916, wanting a name for their new movement, chose it at random by stabbing a French-German dictionary with a paper knife, and picking the name that the point landed upon.^ (The most popular version of the story is that the word was picked at random from a French-German dictionary.
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^ Dada was originated in 1916 by Tzara, the German writer Hugo Ball, the Alsatian-born artist Jean Arp, and other intellectuals living in Zurich, Switzerland.

^ The most widely accepted account of the movement's naming concerns a meeting held in 1916 at Hugo Ball's Cabaret (Caf) Voltaire in Zrich, during which a paper knife inserted into a French-German dictionary pointed to the word "dada".
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.Dada in French is a child's word for hobby-horse.^ The word "dada" was picked at random out of a dictionary, and is actually the French word for "hobbyhorse".
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^ Dada is ‘yes, yes’ in Rumanian, ‘rocking horse’ and ‘hobby horse’ in French,” he noted in his diary.
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.In French, the colloquialism c'est mon dada means it's my hobby.^ Dada is ‘yes, yes’ in Rumanian, ‘rocking horse’ and ‘hobby horse’ in French,” he noted in his diary.
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  • Dada | Arts & Culture | Smithsonian Magazine 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.smithsonianmag.com [Source type: General]

[8]
.According to the Dada ideal, the movement would not be called "Dadaism", much less designated an art-movement.^ This new, irrational art movement would be named Dada.
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^ Dada as a movement declined in the 1920s, and some of its practitioners became prominent in other modern-art movements, notably surrealism.

^ One would be hard pressed to name an artistic movement since 1923 which does not, at least in part, trace its roots to Dada: Surrealism, Constructivism, Lettrism, Fluxus, Pop- and Op-Art, Conceptual Art, Minimalism.
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[9]

Zürich

.In 1916, Hugo Ball, Emmy Hennings, Tristan Tzara, Jean Arp, Marcel Janco, Richard Huelsenbeck, Sophie Täuber, Hans Richter, along with others, discussed art and put on performances in the Cabaret Voltaire expressing their disgust with the war and the interests that inspired it.^ Ball wanted to shock anyone, he wrote, who regarded “all this civilized carnage as a triumph of European intelligence.” One Cabaret Voltaire performer, Romanian artist Tristan Tzara, described its nightly shows as “explosions of elective imbecility.” .
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  • Dada | Arts & Culture | Smithsonian Magazine 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.smithsonianmag.com [Source type: General]

^ Dada was originated in 1916 by Tzara, the German writer Hugo Ball, the Alsatian-born artist Jean Arp, and other intellectuals living in Zurich, Switzerland.

^ The most widely accepted account of the movement's naming concerns a meeting held in 1916 at Hugo Ball's Cabaret (Caf) Voltaire in Zrich, during which a paper knife inserted into a French-German dictionary pointed to the word "dada".
  • Dada - The Anti-War Art Movement 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.lilithgallery.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

By some accounts Dada coalesced on October 6 at the cabaret. .By other accounts Dada did not spring full-grown from a Zürich literary salon but grew out of an already vibrant artistic tradition in Eastern Europe, particularly Romania, that transposed to Switzerland when a group of Romanian modernist artists Tzara, Marcel & Iuliu Iancu, Arthur Segal, and others, settled in Zürich.^ Dada was originated in 1916 by Tzara, the German writer Hugo Ball, the Alsatian-born artist Jean Arp, and other intellectuals living in Zurich, Switzerland.

^ The term dada, the French word for hobbyhorse, is said to have been selected at random from a dictionary by the Romanian-born poet, essayist, and editor Tristan Tzara.

^ Sonia Dada, an eclectic, exciting genre bending rock & roll group, was born in the spring of 1990.
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.Because Bucharest and other cities had already been the scene of Dada-like poetry, prose and spectacle in the years before WW1., this suggests Dada came from the East.^ A priori, in other words with its eyes closed, Dada places before action and above all: Doubt.
  • Seven Dada Manifestos and Lampisteries - Wikilivres 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.wikilivres.info [Source type: Original source]

[10]
.The artists were in "neutral" Zürich, Switzerland, having left Germany and Romania during the happenings of WWI. It was here that they decided to use abstraction to fight against the social, political, and cultural ideas of that time that they believed had caused the war.^ Dada is opposed to ART. Zurich was the birthplace of DADA. Given Switzerland's neutrality, Zurich became a place of refuge during World War I. Hugo Ball (pacifist and poet) and Emmy Hennings (poet and singer) fled Germany just after war was declared.
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^ It would be hard for us to find much that was overtly political in the early Dada performances and publications, but from the beginning the movement dedicated itself to attacking the cultural values which its members believed had led to the world war.
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^ You'll get the idea why they shifted to TIME-based.

Abstraction was viewed as the result of a lack of planning and logical thought processes. [11]
"[A]bstract art signified absolute honesty for us." - Richard Huelsenbeck
.At the first public soiree at the cabaret on July 14, 1916, Ball recited the first manifesto (see text).^ "Lorsque je fondis le Cabaret Voltaire" ["Why I founded the Cabaret Voltaire"], in the publication "Cabaret Voltaire," Zrich, 1916) Ball protested several times "against the humiliating fact of a world war in the 20th century."
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.Tzara, in 1918, wrote a Dada manifesto considered one of the most important of the Dada writings.^ She also was seen often with Tzara who considered her "very American": the quintessential fashionable liberated woman of the 20's; he wrote Mouchoir de nuages for her.
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^ And the single most important bibliographic resource for these scholars is the International Dada Archive at The University of Iowa.
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^ The Founder : Tristan Tzara * Wrote Dada Manifesto (mission statement).
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Other manifestos followed.
Marcel Janco recalled,
We had lost confidence in our culture. Everything had to be demolished. We would begin again after the "tabula rasa". At the Cabaret Voltaire we began by shocking common sense, public opinion, education, institutions, museums, good taste, in short, the whole prevailing order.
.A single issue of Cabaret Voltaire was the first publication to come out of the movement.^ In the Zrich DaDa-publications "Cabaret Voltaire," "Dada" (issues 1-3), and "391" (issue #8), he published illustrations; in "Dada" (issue 4/5) and "Der Zeltweg" he published illustrations and poems.
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After the cabaret closed down, activities moved to a new gallery, and Ball left Europe. .Tzara began a relentless campaign to spread Dada ideas.^ But the absurdist outlook spread like a pandemic—Tzara called Dada “a virgin microbe”—and there were outbreaks from Berlin to Paris, New York and even Tokyo.
  • Dada | Arts & Culture | Smithsonian Magazine 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.smithsonianmag.com [Source type: General]

.He bombarded French and Italian artists and writers with letters, and soon emerged as the Dada leader and master strategist.^ Dada was originated in 1916 by Tzara, the German writer Hugo Ball, the Alsatian-born artist Jean Arp, and other intellectuals living in Zurich, Switzerland.

^ Tzara did not organize this first Dada event in Paris, but soon he was leading the young artists in the manifestations.
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^ During the mid-1950s an interest in Dada was revived in New York City among composers, writers, and artists, who produced many works with Dadaist features.

.The Cabaret Voltaire has by now re-opened, and is still in the same place at the Spiegelgasse 1 in the Niederdorf.^ In February 1916 he founded the "Cabaret Voltaire" in the Spiegelgasse in Zrich.
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.Zürich Dada, with Tzara at the helm, published the art and literature review Dada beginning in July 1917, with five editions from Zürich and the final two from Paris.^ December 1963, Paris, France) Romanian-born French poet and essayist known mainly as a founder of Dada, a nihilistic revolutionary movement in the arts.
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^ But the absurdist outlook spread like a pandemic—Tzara called Dada “a virgin microbe”—and there were outbreaks from Berlin to Paris, New York and even Tokyo.
  • Dada | Arts & Culture | Smithsonian Magazine 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.smithsonianmag.com [Source type: General]

^ First in Zürich, Switzerland, and later in Paris, Tzara wrote the movement's first manifestos, describing its nihilistic tenets.

.When World War I ended in 1918, most of the Zürich Dadaists returned to their home countries, and some began Dada activities in other cities.^ I live in a most dada city….
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^ Dada as a movement declined in the 1920s, and some of its practitioners became prominent in other modern-art movements, notably surrealism.

^ In the end, the work was destroyed by Allied bombers during World War II. .
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Berlin

Cover of Anna Blume, Dichtungen, 1919
.The groups in Germany were not as strongly anti-art as other groups.^ That group had adopted an "anti-art" attitude and was thus a movement parallel to Zurich dadaism.
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.Their activity and art was more political and social, with corrosive manifestos and propaganda, satire, public demonstrations and overt political activities.^ "In the first part of the 1900s, America was a nation in transition, ripe for evolutions in politics, social systems, literature, and certainly art.
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.It has been suggested that this is at least partially due to Berlin's proximity to the front, and that for an opposite effect, New York's geographic distance from the war spawned its more theoretically-driven, less political nature.^ Dada was many things, but it was essentially an anti-war movement in Europe and New York from 1915 to 1923.
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^ The New York counterpart tended to be more whimsical and less about the violence that was happening overseas.
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^ Exhibited in Berlin and at the Museum of Modern Art, New York.
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.In February 1918, Huelsenbeck gave his first Dada speech in Berlin, and produced a Dada manifesto later in the year.^ Came to the Berlin dada movement in 1918.
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^ Speech from The First Celestial Adventure of Mr Antipyrine (1916) [ Twentieth-Century Theatre: A Sourcebook by Richard Drain; Routledge, 1995 ] Tristan Tzara (1896-1963), Romanian writer, moved to Zurich in 1915; a year later, barely 20, he and a group of friends founded Dada.
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^ Huelsenbeck imported dada to Berlin, and it assumed immediately political features.
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.Hannah Höch and George Grosz used Dada to express post-World War I communist sympathies.^ But even in post-war Paris, Dada become too bleak and hopeless to work.
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^ By the end of World War I, Dada was very popular in the German cities Berlin, Cologne and Hanover, expressing the view of many Germans at the time that the war was folly.
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^ Dada could work in the middle of the First World War, in a time of some madness, in the same way that absurdist theatre could thrive in the late-1950s.
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Grosz, together with John Heartfield, developed the technique of photomontage during this period. .The artists published a series of short-lived political journals, and held the First International Dada Fair, 'the greatest project yet conceived by the Berlin Dadaists', in the summer of 1920.[12] As well as the main members of Berlin Dada, Grosz, Raoul Hausmann, Höch, Johannes Baader, Huelsenbeck and Heartfield, the exhibition also included work by Otto Dix, Francis Picabia, Jean Arp, Max Ernst, Rudolf Schlichter, Johannes Baargeld and others.^ Exhibited at the first Zrich DaDa exhibition.
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^ Huelsenbeck imported dada to Berlin, and it assumed immediately political features.
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^ His dadaist works were exhibited in Paris in 1920.
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[12] .In all, over 200 works were exhibited, surrounded by incendiary slogans, some of which also ended up written on the walls of the Nazi's Entartete Kunst exhibition in 1937. Despite high ticket prices, the exhibition made a loss, with only one recorded sale.^ Originally the Association of American Painters and Sculptors planned only to exhibit some foreign art along with its own work, but Davies’s goal was to show American artists and their public what Europeans were accomplishing.
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^ In 1912 he painted one of his main works, "Nudes descending a Staircase", shown for the first time in October of that year at the exhibition of the "Golden Section".
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[13]
.The Berlin group published periodicals such as Club Dada, Der Dada, Everyman His Own Football , and Dada Almanach.^ Contributed drawings to the Berlin periodical "Der Sturm" ("The Storm").
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^ He returned to Berlin in January, 1917, initiating the Dada group there.
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^ On January 25th, 1917, he published the first number of his periodical, which he named "391" to recall the Stieglitz group's "291".
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Cologne

.In Cologne, Ernst, Baargeld, and Arp launched a controversial Dada exhibition in 1920 which focused on nonsense and anti-bourgeois sentiments.^ In 1919 he founded, together with Arp and Baargeld, the Cologne dada group and collaborated with Arp in the creation of the "Fatagaga" collages ("Fatagaga" = "Fabrication de tableaux garantis gazomtriques" = "Manufacture of guaranteed gasometric pictures").
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^ In 1919 he travelled to Cologne (Kln), and founded the Cologne DaDa group with Max Ernst and Johannes Baargeld.
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^ In 1914 he met Arp at the "Werkbund" exhibition, Cologne.
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Cologne's Early Spring Exhibition was set up in a pub, and required that participants walk past urinals while being read lewd poetry by a woman in a communion dress. .The police closed the exhibition on grounds of obscenity, but it was re-opened when the charges were dropped.^ Organized the dada-exhibition in the "Brauhaus Winter", which was closed by the police as contrary to "morals".
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[14]

New York

Rrose Sélavy, the alter ego of famed Dadaist Marcel Duchamp.
.Like Zürich, New York City was a refuge for writers and artists from World War I. Soon after arriving from France in 1915, Marcel Duchamp and Francis Picabia met American artist Man Ray.^ In 1917 Duchamp sent a "work" called "Fountain" to the New York "Independent Show", signed with the name "R. Mutt", it was nothing but a common urinal.
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^ A similar revolt against conventional art occurred simultaneously in New York City led by Man Ray, Marcel Duchamp, and Francis Picabia, and in Paris, where it became the inspiration for the Surrealist movement.

^ In 1915 he went to the United States for the second time and collaborated with Marcel Duchamp.
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.By 1916 the three of them became the center of radical anti-art activities in the United States.^ In 1915 he went to the United States for the first time and soon became the center of the circle of painters round the "Stieglitz" gallery.
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American Beatrice Wood, who had been studying in France, soon joined them, along with Elsa von Freytag-Loringhoven. Arthur Cravan, fleeing conscription in France, was also present for a time. .Much of their activity centered in Alfred Stieglitz's gallery, 291, and the home of Walter and Louise Arensberg.^ The movement was centered at Alfred Stieglitz's gallery, "291," and at the studio of the Walter Arensbergs.
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^ In 1915 he went to the United States for the first time and soon became the center of the circle of painters round the "Stieglitz" gallery.
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.The New Yorkers, though not particularly organized, called their activities Dada, but they did not issue manifestos.^ Akili Dada's mission; they volunteer their time because they believe strongly in the kind of positive change the organization is effecting in Kenya.
  • Akili Dada . Reviews and ratings from volunteers, donors, clients on GreatNonprofits.org. 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC greatnonprofits.org [Source type: General]

^ Reply 11 Deny Deyn January 7th, 2010 6:58 am very inspiring, though I did not know about blaxploitation and dadaism .
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.They issued challenges to art and culture through publications such as The Blind Man, Rongwrong, and New York Dada in which they criticized the traditionalist basis for museum art.^ A similar revolt against conventional art occurred simultaneously in New York City led by Man Ray, Marcel Duchamp, and Francis Picabia, and in Paris, where it became the inspiration for the Surrealist movement.

^ In 1917 Duchamp edited the periodicals, "The Blind Man" and "Rongwrong", which had an unmistakably dadaist character.
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^ The New York art movement arose almost independently.
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.New York Dada lacked the disillusionment of European Dada and was instead driven by a sense of irony and humor.^ Dada was many things, but it was essentially an anti-war movement in Europe and New York from 1915 to 1923.
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^ During the mid-1950s an interest in Dada was revived in New York City among composers, writers, and artists, who produced many works with Dadaist features.

In his book Adventures in the arts: informal chapters on painters, vaudeville and poets Marsden Hartley included an essay on "The Importance of Being 'Dada'".
.During this time Duchamp began exhibiting "readymades" (found objects) such as a bottle rack, and got involved with the Society of Independent Artists.^ To this end, the Dadaists used novel materials, including discarded objects found in the streets, and new methods, such as allowing chance to determine the elements of their works.

^ French painter Marcel Duchamp exhibited as works of art ordinary commercial products such as a store-bought bottle rack and a urinalwhich he called ready-mades.

.In 1917 he submitted the now famous Fountain, a urinal signed R. Mutt, to the Society of Independent Artists show only to have the piece rejected.^ In 1917 Duchamp sent a "work" called "Fountain" to the New York "Independent Show", signed with the name "R. Mutt", it was nothing but a common urinal.
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First an object of scorn within the arts community, the Fountain has since become almost canonized by some. The committee presiding over Britain's prestigious Turner Prize in 2004, for example, called it "the most influential work of modern art."[15] In an attempt to "pay homage to the spirit of Dada" a performance artist named Pierre Pinoncelli made a crack in The Fountain with a hammer in January 2006; he also urinated on it in 1993.
.Picabia's travels tied New York, Zürich and Paris groups together during the Dadaist period.^ A similar revolt against conventional art occurred simultaneously in New York City led by Man Ray, Marcel Duchamp, and Francis Picabia, and in Paris, where it became the inspiration for the Surrealist movement.

^ During the mid-1950s an interest in Dada was revived in New York City among composers, writers, and artists, who produced many works with Dadaist features.

^ After World War I the movement spread to Germany, and many of the Zurich group joined French Dadaists in Paris.

For seven years he also published the Dada periodical 391 in Barcelona, New York City, Zürich, and Paris from 1917 through 1924.
.By 1921, most of the original players moved to Paris where Dada experienced its last major incarnation (see Neo-Dada for later activity).^ The Paris Dada movement later evolved into Surrealism by 1924.
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^ See All dadaism does not have any recent activity.
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^ At the beginning of his creative work he was linked with the Paris dada movement, later with surrealism.
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Paris

.The French avant-garde kept abreast of Dada activities in Zürich with regular communications from Tristan Tzara (whose pseudonym means "sad in country," a name chosen to protest the treatment of Jews in his native Romania), who exchanged letters, poems, and magazines with Guillaume Apollinaire, André Breton, Max Jacob, Clément Pansaers, and other French writers, critics and artists.^ French critic, writer, and poet.
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^ Dada was originated in 1916 by Tzara, the German writer Hugo Ball, the Alsatian-born artist Jean Arp, and other intellectuals living in Zurich, Switzerland.

^ The term dada, the French word for hobbyhorse, is said to have been selected at random from a dictionary by the Romanian-born poet, essayist, and editor Tristan Tzara.

.Paris had arguably been the classical music capital of the world since the advent of musical Impressionism in the late 19th century.^ Art Nouveau is an artistic movement from the late-19th and early-20th century.
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One of its practitioners, Erik Satie, collaborated with Picasso and Cocteau in a mad, scandalous ballet called Parade. .First performed by the Ballets Russes in 1917, it succeeded in creating a scandal but in a different way than Stravinsky's Le Sacre du Printemps had done almost 5 years earlier.^ For years, Warhol created variations on the theme that influenced not only art but the fashion world in innumerable ways.
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^ In 1917 he created his first abstract wooden reliefs.
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This was a ballet that was clearly parodying itself, something traditional ballet patrons would obviously have serious issues with.
Dada in Paris surged in 1920 when many of the originators converged there. .Inspired by Tzara, Paris Dada soon issued manifestos, organized demonstrations, staged performances and produced a number of journals (the final two editions of Dada, Le Cannibale, and Littérature featured Dada in several editions.^ In February he took connection with the Zrich Dada group and contributed to "Dada" Issue Number 3.
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^ He returned to Paris, published further issues of "391", and took part in dada demonstrations.
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^ When Tristan Tzara came to Paris from Zrich in 1916, Breton joined the Paris DaDa movement together with his friends Paul Eluard and Phillipe Soupalt.
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)[16]
.The first introduction of Dada artwork to the Parisian public was at the Salon des Indépendants in 1921. Jean Crotti exhibited works associated with Dada including a work entitled, Explicatif bearing the word Tabu.^ Exhibited at the first Zrich DaDa exhibition.
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^ Exhibited his first abstract works (rectangular forms), collages, and tapestries, together with worrks by Otto and Mme.
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^ In 1912 he painted one of his main works, "Nudes descending a Staircase", shown for the first time in October of that year at the exhibition of the "Golden Section".
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.In the same year Tzara staged his Dadaist play The Gas Heart to howls of derision from the audience.^ In the same year he created "The Coffee-Mill", important as regards to form and the part it played in the general development.
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When it was re-staged in 1923 in a more professional production, the play provoked a theatre riot (initiated by André Breton) that heralded the split within the movement that was to produce Surrealism. Tzara's last attempt at a Dadaist drama was his "ironic tragedy" Handkerchief of Clouds in 1924.

Netherlands

.In the Netherlands the Dada movement centered mainly around Theo van Doesburg, most well known for establishing the De Stijl movement and magazine of the same name.^ Theo van Doesburg, Kleine Dada Soirée .
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^ December 1963, Paris, France) Romanian-born French poet and essayist known mainly as a founder of Dada, a nihilistic revolutionary movement in the arts.
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^ In the same year he went to Zrich and joined the Dada movement.
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.Van Doesburg mainly focused on poetry, and included poems from many well-known Dada writers in De Stijl such as Hugo Ball, Hans Arp and Kurt Schwitters.^ As part of the proclamation, Highberger will utter the "zimzim" phrase, from a poem by Dada founder Hugo Ball, the late German author and poet.
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^ In 1957, Hans Richter finished a film named "Dadascope" with original poems and prosa spoken by their creators: Hans Arp, Marcel Duchamp, Raoul Hausmann, Richard Huelsenbeck, and Kurt Schwitters.
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^ December 1963, Paris, France) Romanian-born French poet and essayist known mainly as a founder of Dada, a nihilistic revolutionary movement in the arts.
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.Van Doesburg became a friend of Schwitters, and together they organized the so-called Dutch Dada campaign in 1923, where Van Doesburg promoted a leaflet about Dada (entitled What is Dada?), Schwitters read his poems, Vilmos Huszàr demonstrated a mechanical dancing doll and Nelly Van Doesburg (Theo's wife), played avant-garde compositions on piano.^ In 1926, she receives the assignment to design the interior of the Caf Aubette in Straburg - a task she eventually shares with Hans Arp and Theo van Doesburg.
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^ When Tristan Tzara came to Paris from Zrich in 1916, Breton joined the Paris DaDa movement together with his friends Paul Eluard and Phillipe Soupalt.
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.Van Doesburg wrote Dada poetry himself in De Stijl, although under a pseudonym, I.K. Bonset, which was only revealed after his death in 1931. 'Together' with I.K. Bonset, he also published a short-lived Dutch Dada magazine called Mécano.^ Theo van Doesburg, Kleine Dada Soirée .
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^ From 1923-1932 he published a magazine called "Merz" in which he published his poems and art.
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^ In 1920 he was a member of the November group in Berlin and contributed to the Dutch periodical "De Stijl."
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Georgia

.Although Dada itself was unknown in Georgia until at least 1920, from 1917-1921 a group of poets called themselves "41st Degree" (referring both to the latitude of Tbilisi, Georgia and to the temperature of a high fever) organized along Dadaist lines.^ He returned to Berlin in January, 1917, initiating the Dada group there.
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^ In 1920 he published a periodical, "Cannibale", and in 1921, together with Breton and others, he dissociated himself from "orthodox" dadaists (i.e.
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The most important figure in this group was Iliazd, whose radical typographical designs visually echo the publications of the Dadaists. .After his flight to Paris in 1921, he collaborated with Dadaists on publications and events.^ Collaborated in numerous dadaist publications.
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Yugoslavia

In Yugoslavia there was heavy Dada activity between 1920 and 1922 run mainly by Dragan Aleksic and including Mihailo S. Petrov, Zenitist's two brothers Ljubomir Micic and Branko Ve Poljanski. .Aleksic used the term "Yugo-Dada" and is known to have been in contact with Raoul Hausmann, Kurt Schwitters, and Tristan Tzara.^ In 1957, Hans Richter finished a film named "Dadascope" with original poems and prosa spoken by their creators: Hans Arp, Marcel Duchamp, Raoul Hausmann, Richard Huelsenbeck, and Kurt Schwitters.
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^ When Tristan Tzara came to Paris from Zrich in 1916, Breton joined the Paris DaDa movement together with his friends Paul Eluard and Phillipe Soupalt.
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^ The artists included: Raoul Hausmann, John Heartfield, Max Ernst, Kurt Schwitters, Otto Dix, and George Grosz (Dix and Grosz later became part of the Neue Sachlichkeit movement).
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[17]

Tokyo

.A prominent Dada group in Japan was MAVO, founded by Tomoyoshi Murayama and Yanase Masamu.^ In 1919 he travelled to Cologne (Kln), and founded the Cologne DaDa group with Max Ernst and Johannes Baargeld.
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^ Founded the Cologne DaDa group together with Max Ernst.
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Other prominent artists were Jun Tsuji, Eisuke Yoshiyuki, Shinkichi Takahashi and Katsue Kitasono.

Poetry; music and sound

.Dada was not confined to the visual and literary arts; its influence reached into sound and music.^ The style was influenced by other genres mentioned: pop art, art nouveau, dadaism.
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.Kurt Schwitters developed what he called sound poems and composers such as Erwin Schulhoff, Hans Heusser and Albert Savinio wrote Dada music, while members of Les Six collaborated with members of the Dada movement and had their works performed at Dada gatherings.^ Picabia founded a Dada periodical called "391" in Barcelona and introduced the Dada movement to Paris in 1919.
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^ In 1957, Hans Richter finished a film named "Dadascope" with original poems and prosa spoken by their creators: Hans Arp, Marcel Duchamp, Raoul Hausmann, Richard Huelsenbeck, and Kurt Schwitters.
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^ Dadaism was no artificially fostered movement but an organic product, at its origin a reaction to the cloudlike ramblings of so-called sacred art.
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The above mentioned Erik Satie dabbled with Dadaist ideas throughout his career although he is primarily associated with musical Impressionism.
In the very first Dada publication, Hugo Ball describes a "balalaika orchestra playing delightful folk-songs." African music and jazz was common at Dada gatherings, signaling a return to nature and naive primitivism.

Legacy

While broad, the movement was unstable. .By 1924 in Paris, Dada was melding into surrealism, and artists had gone on to other ideas and movements, including surrealism, social realism and other forms of modernism.^ The Paris Dada movement later evolved into Surrealism by 1924.
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^ Took a leading part in the Paris dada movement and contributed to numerous Dada publications.
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^ Was very active in the Paris dada movement, occasionally serving as its secretary.
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.Some theorists argue that Dada was actually the beginning of postmodern art.^ On his dada period he wrote in his book "Art In Danger": "Civilian again, I experienced in Berlin the rudimentary beginnings of the dada movement, the start of which coincided with the 'swede' period of malnutrition.
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[18]
.By the dawn of World War II, many of the European Dadaists had fled or emigrated to the United States.^ Dadaists originally theorized that such a world that could descend into the mindless violence of World War I ought to have an art that reflected this state of irrationality.
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^ By the end of World War I, Dada was very popular in the German cities Berlin, Cologne and Hanover, expressing the view of many Germans at the time that the war was folly.
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Some died in death camps under Hitler, who persecuted the kind of "Degenerate art" that Dada represented. .The movement became less active as post-World War II optimism led to new movements in art and literature.^ Picasso’s self-portrait in 1949 opened new doors in the world of modern art.
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^ Dadaists originally theorized that such a world that could descend into the mindless violence of World War I ought to have an art that reflected this state of irrationality.
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^ The New York art movement arose almost independently.
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.Dada is a named influence and reference of various anti-art and political and cultural movements including the Situationists and culture jamming groups like the Cacophony Society.^ That group had adopted an "anti-art" attitude and was thus a movement parallel to Zurich dadaism.
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^ The “large sweeping letters that favored aesthetic and form over readability” that is described started in the sixties within the counter-culture and psychedelic art movement.
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^ The style was influenced by other genres mentioned: pop art, art nouveau, dadaism.
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.At the same time that the Zürich Dadaists made noise and spectacle at the Cabaret Voltaire, Vladimir Lenin wrote his revolutionary plans for Russia in a nearby apartment.^ Made his acquaintance in 1913 and went to Zurich with him in 1915, where she helped to found the "Cabaret Voltaire" and took part in its performances.
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Tom Stoppard used this coincidence as a premise for his play Travesties (1974), which includes Tzara, Lenin, and James Joyce as characters. French writer Dominique Noguez imagined Lenin as a member of the Dada group in his tongue-in-cheek Lénine Dada (1989).
.The Cabaret Voltaire fell into disrepair until it was occupied from January to March, 2002, by a group proclaiming themselves neo-Dadaists, led by Mark Divo.^ Came to Zrich in February 1916 as a ware-resistor and immediately came into contact with the "Cabaret Voltaire."
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[19] The group included Jan Thieler, Ingo Giezendanner, Aiana Calugar, Lennie Lee and Dan Jones. After their eviction the space became a museum dedicated to the history of Dada. The work of Lennie Lee and Dan Jones remained on the walls of the museum.
Several notable retrospectives have examined the influence of Dada upon art and society. .In 1967, a large Dada retrospective was held in Paris, France.^ December 1963, Paris, France) Romanian-born French poet and essayist known mainly as a founder of Dada, a nihilistic revolutionary movement in the arts.
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.In 2006, the Museum of Modern Art in New York City held a Dada exhibition in conjunction with the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. and the Centre Pompidou in Paris.^ In 1920 first exhibition of collages at the "Sans Pareil" gallery, Paris.
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^ In 1949 a big retrospective exhibition was organized at the Drouin Gallery, Paris.
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^ First contacts with modern art in 1912 through the "Blauen Reiter" and in 1913 through the "Erster Deutsche Herbstsalon" gallery "Der Sturm", Berlin.
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Art techniques developed

Collage

.The dadaists imitated the techniques developed during the cubist movement through the pasting of cut pieces of paper items, but extended their art to encompass items such as transportation tickets, maps, plastic wrappers, etc.^ Dadaists originally theorized that such a world that could descend into the mindless violence of World War I ought to have an art that reflected this state of irrationality.
  • Modern Art Movements To Inspire Your Logo Design - Smashing Magazine 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.smashingmagazine.com [Source type: General]

^ Dadaism - more frequently called Dada - was an international art movement started during World War I in Zurich, Switzerland.
  • Mayor says it's time for nonsense / LJWorld.com 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www2.ljworld.com [Source type: General]

to portray aspects of life, rather than representing objects viewed as still life.

Photomontage

.The Berlin Dadaists - the "monteurs" (mechanics) - would use scissors and glue rather than paintbrushes and paints to express their views of modern life through images presented by the media.^ Artists use their creative talents professionally, expressing it through painting, computers, drawing, dance or architecture.
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^ First contacts with modern art in 1912 through the "Blauen Reiter" and in 1913 through the "Erster Deutsche Herbstsalon" gallery "Der Sturm", Berlin.
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^ By the end of World War I, Dada was very popular in the German cities Berlin, Cologne and Hanover, expressing the view of many Germans at the time that the war was folly.
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A variation on the collage technique, photomontage utilized actual or reproductions of real photographs printed in the press.

Assemblage

The assemblages were three-dimensional variations of the collage - the assembly of everyday objects to produce meaningful or meaningless (relative to the war) pieces of work.

Readymades

Marcel Duchamp began to view the manufactured objects of his collection as objects of art, which he called "readymades". He would add signatures and titles to some, converting them into artwork that he called "readymade aided" or "rectified readymades". Duchamp wrote: "One important characteristic was the short sentence which I occasionally inscribed on the 'readymade.' That sentence, instead of describing the object like a title, was meant to carry the mind of the spectator towards other regions more verbal. Sometimes I would add a graphic detail of presentation which in order to satisfy my craving for alliterations, would be called 'readymade aided.'" .[20]One such example of Duchamp's readymade works is the urinal that was turned onto its back, signed "R. Mutt", titled "Fountain", and submitted to the Society of Independent Artists exhibition that year.^ In 1917 Duchamp sent a "work" called "Fountain" to the New York "Independent Show", signed with the name "R. Mutt", it was nothing but a common urinal.
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^ For a more original design, draw on abstract elements from various images; such as the color from one image, line work from another and composition from yet another.
  • Modern Art Movements To Inspire Your Logo Design - Smashing Magazine 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.smashingmagazine.com [Source type: General]

^ Accompanied by funky music by such artists as Isaac Hayes and Curtis Mayfield, the movies brought a new lifestyle to the black community, one that encouraged black empowerment and love, backed by soulful, funky beats.
  • Modern Art Movements To Inspire Your Logo Design - Smashing Magazine 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.smashingmagazine.com [Source type: General]

[11]

See also

References

  1. ^ de Micheli, Mario(2006). Las vanguardias artísticas del siglo XX. Alianza Forma. p.135-137
  2. ^ Melzer (1976, 55).
  3. ^ Richter, Hans (1965), Dada: Art and Anti-art, Oxford Univ Press 
  4. ^ Schneede, Uwe M. (1979), George Grosz, His life and work, Universe Books 
  5. ^ DADA: Cities, National Gallery of Art, http://www.nga.gov/exhibitions/2006/dada/cities/index.shtm, retrieved 2008-10-19 
  6. ^ a b Fred S. Kleiner (2006), Gardner's Art Through the Ages (12th ed.), Wadsworth Publishing, pp. 754 
  7. ^ [1] Dada biographies NGA, Washington DC. Retrieved July 15, 2009
  8. ^ Marc Dachy, "Dada & les dadaïsmes," Paris, Gallimard, Folio Essais, n° 257, 1994.
  9. ^ Aurélie Verdier, L'ABCdaire de Dada, Paris, Flammarion, 2005.
  10. ^ Tom Sandqvist, DADA EAST: The Romanians of Cabaret Voltaire, London MIT Press, 2006.
  11. ^ a b , http://www.nga.gov/exhibitions/2006/dada/cities/index.shtm 
  12. ^ a b Dada, Dickermann, National Gallery of Art, Washington, 2006 p443
  13. ^ Dada, Dickermann, National Gallery of Art, Washington, 2006 p99
  14. ^ Schaefer, Robert A. (September 7, 2006), "Das Ist Dada–An Exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in NYC", Double Exposure, http://www.doubleexposure.com/DadaExhibit.shtml 
  15. ^ "Duchamp's urinal tops art survey", BBC News December 1, 2004.
  16. ^ Marc Dachy, Dada, la révolte de l'art, Paris, Gallimard / Centre Pompidou, "Découvertes" n° 476 , 2005.
  17. ^ [2]Impossible Histories Historic Avant-Gardes, Neo-Avant-Gardes, and Post-Avant-Gardes in Yugoslavia, 1918-1991, Edited by Dubravka Djuric and Misko Suvakovic, pp.18, 71,132, retrieved July 15, 2009
  18. ^ Locher, David (1999), "Unacknowledged Roots and Blatant Imitation: Postmodernism and the Dada Movement", Electronic Journal of Sociology 4 (1), http://www.sociology.org/content/vol004.001/locher.html, retrieved 2007-04-25 
  19. ^ 2002 occupation by neo-Dadaists Prague Post
  20. ^ "The Writings of Marcel Duchamp" ISBN 0-306-80341-0
  • The Dada Almanac, ed Richard Huelsenbeck [1920], re-edited and translated by Malcolm Green et al., Atlas Press, with texts by Hans Arp, Johannes Baader, Hugo Ball, Paul Citröen, Paul Dermée, Daimonides, Max Goth, John Heartfield, Raoul Hausmann, Richard Huelsenbeck, Vincente Huidobro, Mario D’Arezzo, Adon Lacroix, Walter Mehring, Francis Picabia, Georges Ribemont-Dessaignes, Alexander Sesqui, Philippe Soupault, Tristan Tzara. .ISBN 0 947757 62 7
  • Blago Bung, Blago Bung, Hugo Ball's Tenderenda, Richard Huelsenbeck's Fantastic Prayers, & Walter Serner's Last Loosening - three key texts of Zurich ur-Dada.^ Illustrated Tristan Tzara 's "25 Poems" and Huelsenbeck's "Fantastic Prayers," the latter with woodcuts which he called "Studies in Symmetry."
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    ^ Hugo Ball wrote of him, in his "Escape from Time," on 11 February 1916: "Huelsenbeck has arrived.
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    Translated and introduced by Malcolm Green. Atlas Press, ISBN 0 947757 86 4
  • Ball, Hugo. .Flight Out Of Time (University of California Press: Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1996)
  • Dachy, Marc.^ Los Angeles, CALIFORNIA United States Profile Views: 126557 Last Login: 1/16/2010 .
    • dada on MySpace Music - Free Streaming MP3s, Pictures & Music Downloads 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.myspace.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ One of his other significant works are the diary excerpts of his DaDa period published as "Die Flucht aus der Zeit" ("Flight out of Time").
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    .Journal du mouvement Dada 1915-1923, Genève, Albert Skira, 1989 (Grand Prix du Livre d'Art, 1990)
  • Dada & les dadaïsmes, Paris, Gallimard, Folio Essais, n° 257, 1994.
  • Jovanov, Jasna.^ December 1963, Paris, France) Romanian-born French poet and essayist known mainly as a founder of Dada, a nihilistic revolutionary movement in the arts.
    • Dada - The Anti-War Art Movement 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.lilithgallery.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Dada was many things, but it was essentially an anti-war movement in Europe and New York from 1915 to 1923.
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    .Demistifikacija apokrifa: Dadaizam na jugoslovenskim prostorima, Novi Sad/Apostrof 1999.
  • Dada, la révolte de l'art, Paris, Gallimard / Centre Pompidou, Découvertes n° 476 , 2005.
  • Archives Dada / Chronique, Paris, Hazan, 2005.
  • Dada, catalogue d'exposition, Centre Pompidou, 2005.
  • Durozoi, Gérard.^ December 1963, Paris, France) Romanian-born French poet and essayist known mainly as a founder of Dada, a nihilistic revolutionary movement in the arts.
    • Dada - The Anti-War Art Movement 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.lilithgallery.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ He studied at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts and at the Ecole des Arts dcoratifs of Paris.
    • Dada - The Anti-War Art Movement 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.lilithgallery.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Dada - The Anti-War Art Movement Dada - The Anti-War Art Movement The Art History Archive - Art Movements .
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    .Dada et les arts rebelles, Paris, Hazan, Guide des Arts, 2005
  • Hoffman, Irene.^ December 1963, Paris, France) Romanian-born French poet and essayist known mainly as a founder of Dada, a nihilistic revolutionary movement in the arts.
    • Dada - The Anti-War Art Movement 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.lilithgallery.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ He studied at the Ecole des Beaux-Arts and at the Ecole des Arts dcoratifs of Paris.
    • Dada - The Anti-War Art Movement 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.lilithgallery.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    Documents of Dada and Surrealism: Dada and Surrealist Journals in the Mary Reynolds Collection, Ryerson and Burnham Libraries, The Art Institute of Chicago.
  • Huelsenbeck, Richard. .Memoirs of a Dada Drummer, (University of California Press: Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1991)
  • Lemoine, Serge.^ Los Angeles, CALIFORNIA United States Profile Views: 126557 Last Login: 1/16/2010 .
    • dada on MySpace Music - Free Streaming MP3s, Pictures & Music Downloads 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.myspace.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    Dada, Paris, Hazan, coll. L'Essentiel.
  • Lista, Giovanni. Dada libertin & libertaire, Paris, L'insolite, 2005.
  • Melzer, Annabelle. 1976. Dada and Surrealist Performance. PAJ Books ser. Baltimore and London: The Johns Hopkins UP, 1994. ISBN 0801848458.
  • Richter, Hans. Dada: Art and Anti-Art (London: Thames and Hudson, 1965)
  • Sanouillet, Michel. .Dada à Paris, Paris, Jean-Jacques Pauvert, 1965, Flammarion, 1993, CNRS, 2005
  • Schneede, Uwe M. George Grosz, His life and work (New York: Universe Books, 1979)
  • Verdier, Aurélie.^ Learning about these movements is not just fun but brings new life and perspectives to your work.
    • Modern Art Movements To Inspire Your Logo Design - Smashing Magazine 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.smashingmagazine.com [Source type: General]

    L'ABCdaire de Dada, Paris, Flammarion, 2005.

External links

Manifestos

Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

.Dada or Dadaism is a cultural movement that began in neutral Zürich, Switzerland, during World War I and peaked from 1916 to 1920. The movement primarily involved visual arts, literature (poetry, art manifestos, art theory), theater, and graphic design, and concentrated its anti war politic through a rejection of the prevailing standards in art through anti-art cultural works.^ Dada performance began in Switzerland with the opening of the Cabaret Voltaire in 1916.
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^ Dada was anti art establishment and anti art hierarchy.

^ The movement primarily involved visual arts , literature ( poetry , art manifestoes , art theory ), theatre , and graphic design , and concentrated its anti war politic through a rejection of the prevailing standards in art through anti-art cultural works.
  • Dada encyclopedia topics | Reference.com 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.reference.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

Sourced

.
  • "Every product of disgust capable of becoming a negation of the family is Dada; a protest with the fists of its whole being engaged in destructive action: Dada; knowledge of all the means rejected up until now by the shamefaced sex of comfortable compromise and good manners: Dada; abolition of logic, which is the dance of those impotent to create: Dada; of every social hierarchy and equation set up for the sake of values by our valets: Dada; every object, all objects, sentiments, obscurities, apparitions and the precise clash of parallel lines are weapons for the fight: Dada; abolition of memory: Dada; abolition of archaeology: Dada; abolition of prophets: Dada; abolition of the future: Dada; absolute and unquestionable faith in every god that is the immediate product of spontaneity: Dada; elegant and unprejudiced leap from a harmony to the other sphere; trajectory of a word tossed like a screeching phonograph record; to respect all individuals in their folly of the moment: whether it be serious, fearful, timid, ardent, vigorous, determined, enthusiastic; to divest one's church of every useless cumbersome accessory; to spit out disagreeable or amorous ideas like a luminous waterfall, or coddle them - with the extreme satisfaction that it doesn't matter in the least - with the same intensity in the thicket of one's soul - pure of insects for blood well-born, and gilded with bodies of archangels.^ Every product of disgust capable of becoming a negation of the family is Dada; a protest with the fists of its whole being engaged in destructivc action: *Dada; knowledge of all the means rejected up until now by the shamefaced sex of comfortable compromise and good manners: Dada; abolition of logic, which is the dance of those impotent to create: Dada; of every social hierarchy and equation set up for the sake of values by our valets: Dada; every object, all objects, sentiments, obscurities, apparitions and the precise clash of parallel lines are weapons for the fight: Dada; abolition of memory: Dada; abolition of archaeology: Dada; abolition of prophets: Dada; abolition of the future: Dada; absolute and unquestionable faith in every god that is the immediate product of spontaneity:* Dada; elegant and unprejudiced leap from a harmony to the other sphere; trajectory of a word tossed like a screeching phonograph record; to respect all individuals in their folly of the moment: whether it be serious, fearful, timid, ardent, vigorous, determined, enthusiastic; to divest one's church of every useless cumbersome accessory; to spit out disagreeable or amorous ideas like a luminous waterfall, or coddle them -with the extreme satisfaction that it doesn't matter in the least-with the same intensity in the thicket of one's soul-pure of insects for blood well-born, and gilded with bodies of archangels.

    ^ Like everything in life, Dada is useless.

    ^ Thanks for being our friend Dada!
    • MySpace - Something Dada Improvisational Comedy Co. - 102 - Male - Cleveland, Ohio - myspace.com/somethingdada 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC profile.myspace.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .Freedom: Dada Dada Dada, a roaring of tense colours, and interlacing of opposites and of all contradictions, grotesques, inconsistencies: LIFE." - Tristan Tzara, Dada Manifesto, 1918
  • "[A] Dada exhibition.^ Freedom: Dada Dada Dada, a roaring of tense colors, and interlacing of opposites and of all contradictions, grotesques, inconsistencies: LIFE .

    ^ Essay taken from Dada Manifesto (1918) and Lecture on Dada (1922) by Tristan Tzara .
    • ArtLex on Dada 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.artlex.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Tristan Tzara (Zurich, December 1918).
    • Documents of Dada and Surrealism: Dada and Surrealist Journals in the Mary Reynolds Collection 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.artic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    Another one! .What’s the matter with everyone wanting to make a museum piece out of Dada?^ So DADA supports existing no-idling programs and wants to provide further resources and offer a more strategic approach to make them more effective.
    • DADA 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC dadacanada.com [Source type: General]

    ^ DUMBLEDORE SPEAKS: I don't want you to teach DADA It brings out the worst side of you I don't want you to teach DADA I'll have to bring in someone new I don't want you to teach DADA It brings out the worst side of you I don't want you to teach DADA The job is cursed-it might be true I don't want you to teach DADA It brings out the worst side of you I don't want you to teach DADA I'll have to bring in someone new I don't want you to teach DADA It brings out the worst side of you I don't want you to teach DADA The job is cursed-it might be true .
    • DADA Filks 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC home.att.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But Dada would die out in less than a decade and has not had the kind of major museum retrospective it deserves, until now.
    • Dada | Arts & Culture | Smithsonian Magazine 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.smithsonianmag.com [Source type: General]
    • Dada, "The Irreverent Rowdy Revolution" 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.csudh.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
    • Dada | Arts & Culture | Smithsonian Magazine 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.smithsonianmag.com [Source type: General]

    Dada was a bomb ... can you imagine anyone, around half a century after a bomb explodes, wanting to collect the pieces, sticking it together and displaying it?"—Max .Ernst, Quoted in C.W.E. Bigsby, Dada and Surrealism, ch.^ Max Ernst, the leading artist associated with both Dada and Surrealism, is represented by only a handful of collages and paintings that hint at, but hardly do justice to this complex artist.
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    1 (1972).[1]
  • "Dada hurts. .Dada does not jest, for the reason that it was experienced by revolutionary men and not by philistines who demand that art be a decoration for the mendacity of their own emotions....^ DADA work inspired members of a group called FLUXUS , (1950's) who created art in the form of games , fantastic products, and performance art.
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    ^ Some died in death camps under Hitler, who persecuted the kind of " Degenerate art " that Dada represented.
    • Dada encyclopedia topics | Reference.com 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.reference.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ However, the artist who created the Dada art was very serious about his work.
    • Dada and dadaism : history of the Dada movement 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.dadart.com [Source type: General]

    .I am firmly convinced that all art will become dadaistic in the course of time, because from Dada proceeds the perpetual urge for its renovation."—Richard Huelsenbeck, Trans.^ 'What we call Dada is a piece of tomfoolery from the void, in which all the lofty questions have become involved .
    • Dada and dadaism : history of the Dada movement 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.dadart.com [Source type: General]

    ^ 'Dada talks with you, it is everything, it includes everything, it belongs to all religions, can be neither victory nor defeat, it lives in space and not in time.'
    • Dada and dadaism : history of the Dada movement 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.dadart.com [Source type: General]

    ^ A reviewer from the American Art News stated at the time that "The Dada philosophy is the sickest, most paralyzing and most destructive thing that has ever originated from the brain of man."
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    in .The Dada Painters and Poets: An Anthology, ed.^ Robert Motherwell's The Dada Painters and Poets , 2nd ed.
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    ^ A painter, theorist, photographer, and poet, he became an aggressive promoter of Dada in Berlin.
    • Documents of Dada and Surrealism: Dada and Surrealist Journals in the Mary Reynolds Collection 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.artic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Dada 4–5 (Anthologie Dada), ed.
    • Documents of Dada and Surrealism: Dada and Surrealist Journals in the Mary Reynolds Collection 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.artic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .Robert Motherwell (1951).^ A key event in this renewal of interest was the publication in 1951 of Robert Motherwell's anthology The Dada Painters and Poets .
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    “Dada Lives,” Transition no. 25 (Autumn 1936).[2]
  • .
  • "Dada doubts everything.^ DADA doubts everything.
    • Seven Dada Manifestos and Lampisteries - Wikilivres 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.wikilivres.info [Source type: Original source]

    Dada is an armadillo. Everything is Dada, too. Beware of Dada. Anti-dadaism is a disease: selfkleptomania, man’s normal condition, is Dada. .But the real dadas are against Dada."—Tristan Tzara, repr.^ But the real dadas are against DADA. .
    • Seven Dada Manifestos and Lampisteries - Wikilivres 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.wikilivres.info [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Dada Manifesto (1918, Tristan Tzara) .
    • Dada Manifesto (1918, Tristan Tzara) - Free media library 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.freemedialibrary.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The term dada, the French word for hobbyhorse, is said to have been selected at random from a dictionary by the Romanian-born poet, essayist, and editor Tristan Tzara.

    .In The Dada Painters and Poets, ed.^ A key event in this renewal of interest was the publication in 1951 of Robert Motherwell's anthology The Dada Painters and Poets .
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    ^ The Dada Painters and Poets (New York: Wittenborn, 1951) .
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    ^ From "Dada Manifesto" [1918] and "Lecture on Dada" [1922], translated from the French by Robert Motherwell, *Dada Painters and Poets*, by Robert Motherwell, New York, pp.

    .Robert Motherwell (1951).^ A key event in this renewal of interest was the publication in 1951 of Robert Motherwell's anthology The Dada Painters and Poets .
    • Archive 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.lib.uiowa.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    “Dada .Manifesto on Feeble Love and Bitter Love,” sct.^ Dada Manifesto on feeble love and bitter love .
    • Seven Dada Manifestos and Lampisteries - Wikilivres 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.wikilivres.info [Source type: Original source]

    .7, La Vie des Lettres, no.^ In 1920 he published, under the pen name of Rrose Slavy (arroser, c'est la vie), puns in No.
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    4, Paris (1921).[3]

Attributed

.
  • “What we call Dada is a piece of tomfoolery from the void, in which all the lofty questions have become involved .^ I found the part of the Dada section, “Dada questioned all established convention and the very origins of design.
    • Modern Art Movements To Inspire Your Logo Design - Smashing Magazine 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.smashingmagazine.com [Source type: General]

    ^ I jumped at the chance to get involved, and since then have become passionate about Akili Dada's mission and have found my volunteer work with the organization to be incredibly fulfilling.
    • Akili Dada . Reviews and ratings from volunteers, donors, clients on GreatNonprofits.org. 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC greatnonprofits.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Dada questioned all established convention and the very origins of design .
    • Modern Art Movements To Inspire Your Logo Design - Smashing Magazine 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.smashingmagazine.com [Source type: General]

    . .”—.Ball">Hugo Ball
  • “Dada means nothing.^ Dada was originated in 1916 by Tzara, the German writer Hugo Ball, the Alsatian-born artist Jean Arp, and other intellectuals living in Zurich, Switzerland.

    ^ In the very first Dada publication, Hugo Ball describes a "balalaika orchestra playing delightful folk-songs."
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    ^ Hugo Ball was also responsible for the first journal directly associated with Dada.
    • Documents of Dada and Surrealism: Dada and Surrealist Journals in the Mary Reynolds Collection 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.artic.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .We want to change the world with nothing.”—Richard Huelsenbeck
  • “Art is dead.^ In 1918, his art was to change dramatically as a direct consequence of Germany's economic, political and military collapse at the end of the First World War.
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    ^ They wanted to affect all aspects of Western civilization, to take part in the revolutionary changes which were the inevitable result of the chaos of the First World War.
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    ^ For the first time, the American public, the press, and the art world in general were exposed to the changes wrought by the great innovators in European art, from Cezanne to Picabia.
    • Dada in New York 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.ieeff.org [Source type: General]

    .Long live Dada.”—Walter Serner
  • “We do not wish to imitate nature, we do not wish to reproduce.^ Long live Dada.
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    • Seven Dada Manifestos and Lampisteries - Wikilivres 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.wikilivres.info [Source type: Original source]

    We want to produce. We want to produce the way a plant produces its fruit, not depict. We want to produce directly, not indirectly. .Since there is not a trace of abstraction in this art we call it concrete art.”—Hans Arp
  • “Dada .^ Hans Arp , a member of Dada, wrote: .

    ^ DADA work inspired members of a group called FLUXUS , (1950's) who created art in the form of games , fantastic products, and performance art.
    • Dada@Everything2.com 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.everything2.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ One would be hard pressed to name an artistic movement since 1923 which does not, at least in part, trace its roots to Dada: Surrealism, Constructivism, Lettrism, Fluxus, Pop- and Op-Art, Conceptual Art, Minimalism.
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    . . wants over and over again movement: it sees peace only in dynamism.”—Raoul .Hausmann
  • “I wish to blur the firm boundaries which we self-certain people tend to delineate around all we can achieve.”—Hannah Hoch
  • “Invest your money in Dada!^ Other Berlin Dadaists, particularly Raoul Hausmann, Hannah Hoch, the brothers John Heartfield and Weiland Herzfelde, (and Grosz, to a lesser extent), concentrated on photomontage.
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    ^ All your friends are there from the New York Dada period.
    • PLEXUS / REVIEW: John Perreault - Dada Perfume: A Duchamp Interview 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.plexus.org [Source type: General]

    ^ [Credits : Courtesy of Hannah Hoch] REFERENCED IN RELATED TO Aspects of the topic "Dada" are discussed in the following places at Britannica Assorted References .
    • Dada (art movement) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: General]

    .Dada is the only savings bank that pays interest in the hereafter!”—Kurt Schwitters
  • “Art has nothing to do with taste.^ Hanover Kurt Schwitters was born on 20 June 1887, at No.2 Rumannstraße, Hanover, the only child of Edward Schwitters and his wife Henriette (née Beckemeyer).
    • CENTURY ONLINE CHINA ART NETWORKS 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.chinaartnetworks.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ I simply wanted to reach the conclusion: Subscribe to Dada, the only loan that doesn't pay.
    • Seven Dada Manifestos and Lampisteries - Wikilivres 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.wikilivres.info [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Although Schwitters used Dadaistic material—bits of rubbish—to create his works, he achieved a refined formalism that was uncharacteristic of Dada anti-art.
    • Dada (art movement) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: General]

    .Art is not there to be tasted.”—Max Ernst
  • “I have forced myself to contradict myself in order to avoid conforming to my own taste."—Marcel Duchamp
  • “Dada talks with you, it is everything, it includes everything, it belongs to all religions, can be neither victory nor defeat, it lives in space and not in time.”—Francis Picabia
  • “It’s not Dada that is nonsense—but the essence of our age that is nonsense.”—The Dadaists
  • “What is generally termed reality is, to be precise, a frothy nothing.”—Hugo Ball
  • "Dada is the sun, Dada is the egg.^ Francis Picabia and Marcel Duchamp were also key contributors.
    • CENTURY ONLINE CHINA ART NETWORKS 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.chinaartnetworks.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Marcel Duchamp and the dadaists created the foundation of modern art today.
    • Any Marcel Duchamp fans in Dada house? - Ovation TV Community Forum - Ovation TV Message Board - Make Life Creative 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC community.ovationtv.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Any Marcel Duchamp fans in Dada house?
    • Any Marcel Duchamp fans in Dada house? - Ovation TV Community Forum - Ovation TV Message Board - Make Life Creative 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC community.ovationtv.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .Dada is the Police of the Police."—Richard Huelsenbeck
  • “Leave everything.^ Ann Raimes (New York: Viking Press, 1974), Memoirs of a Dada Drummer by Richard Huelsenbeck, ed.
    • Archive 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.lib.uiowa.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Karl Riha and Günter Kämpf (1972; rev. Giessen: Anabas, 1992); Richard Huelsenbeck, ed., Dada Almanach (1921; rpt.
    • Archive 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC www.lib.uiowa.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    Leave Dada. Leave your wife. Leave your mistress. Leave your hopes and fears. Leave your children in the woods. Leave the substance for the shadow. .Leave your easy life, leave what you are given for the future.^ Given your definition, can you (or anyone else) rule in or out my nominations?
    • PowerPop: Weekend Listomania (Special Dada-Dah! Audio/Video Edition) 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC powerpop.blogspot.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Things like your real name, phone numbers and addresses make it easy for someone to find you – even someone you don’t want to find you or someone you don’t want to communicate with.
    • Dada.net 10 February 2010 13:55 UTC terms.dada.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ History has always told us that you should test something first before you put your money or, in this case, our future on it.

    Set off on the roads.”—Andre Breton
Wikipedia
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Look up Dada in Wiktionary, the free dictionary

Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

See also dada, and dadà

English

Noun

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Wikipedia has an article on:
Singular
Dada
  1. A cultural movement that began in Zürich, Switzerland during World War I and peaked from 1916 to 1920. The movement primarily involved visual arts, literature (mainly poetry), theatre, and graphic design, and was characterized by nihilism, deliberate irrationality, disillusionment, cynicism, chance, randomness, and the rejection of the prevailing standards in art.

Translations


Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 26, 2010

Here are sentences from other pages on Dada, which are similar to those in the above article.








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