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Dairy products are generally defined as foods produced from cow's or domestic buffalo's milk. They are usually high-energy-yielding food products. A production plant for such processing is called a dairy or a dairy factory. Raw milk for processing mostly comes from cows and to a lesser amount from domestic buffalos , but occasionally from other mammals such as goats, sheep, yaks, or horses. Dairy products are commonly found in European, Middle Eastern and Indian cuisine, whereas they are almost unknown in East Asian cuisine.

Milk products and production relationships
Dairy farm

Contents

Types of dairy products

  • Milk after optional homogenization, pasteurization, in several grades after standardization of the fat level, and possible addition of bacteria Streptococcus lactis and Leuconostoc citrovorum
    • Crème fraîche, slightly fermented cream
      • Smetana, Central and Eastern European variety of sour cream
      • Clotted cream, thick spoonable cream made by heating
    • Cultured buttermilk, fermented concentrated (water removed) milk using the same bacteria as sour cream
    • Kefir, fermented milk resembling buttermilk but based on different yeast and bacteria culture
    • Kumis/Airag, slightly fermented mares' milk popular in Central Asia
    • Milk powder (or powdered milk), produced by removing the water from milk
      • Whole milk products
      • Buttermilk products
      • Skim milk
      • Whey products
      • Ice Cream
      • High milk-fat & nutritional products (for infant formulas)
      • Cultured and confectionery products
    • Condensed milk, milk which has been concentrated by evaporation, often with sugar added for longer life in an opened can
    • Evaporated milk, (less concentrated than condensed) milk without added sugar
    • Ricotta cheese, milk heated and reduced in volume, known in Indian cuisine as Khoa
    • Infant formula, dried milk powder with specific additives for feeding human infants
    • Baked milk, a variety of boiled milk that has been particularly popular in Russia
  • Butter, mostly milk fat, produced by churning cream
    • Buttermilk, the liquid left over after producing butter from cream, often dried as livestock food
    • Ghee, clarified butter, by gentle heating of butter and removal of the solid matter
    • Anhydrous milkfat
  • Cheese, produced by coagulating milk, separating from whey and letting it ripen, generally with bacteria and sometimes also with certain molds
    • Curds, the soft curdled part of milk (or skim milk) used to make cheese (or casein)
    • Whey, the liquid drained from curds and used for further processing or as a livestock food
    • Cottage cheese
    • Quark
    • Cream cheese, produced by the addition of cream to milk and then curdled to form a rich curd or cheese made from skim milk with cream added to the curd
    • Fromage frais
  • Casein
    • Caseinates
    • Milk protein concentrates and isonates
    • Whey protein concentrates and isonates
    • Hydrolysates
    • Mineral concentrates
  • Yogurt, milk fermented by Streptococcus salivarius ssp. thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus sometimes with additional bacteria, such as Lactobacillus acidophilus
  • Clabber (food), milk naturally fermented top yogurt-like state
  • Gelato, slowly frozen milk and water, lesser fat than ice cream
  • Ice cream, slowly frozen cream and emulsifying additives
  • Other

Health risks of consuming dairy products

Some dairy products may cause health issues for individuals who have a lactose intolerance and milk allergies. Some dairy products such as blue cheese may become contaminated with the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus during ripening, which can trigger asthma and other respiratory problems in susceptible individuals.[1], [2], [3]. Vegans and some vegetarians avoid dairy products due to a variety of ethical, dietary, environmental, political, and religious concerns.

See also

References

  1. ^ Agin, Khosrow. "Seroprevalence of specific immunoglobulin G antibodies against aspergillus fumigatus among chronic persistent asthma". http://journals.sbmu.ac.ir/index.php/ijcid/article/viewArticle/53. Retrieved 11 June 2009. 
  2. ^ El-Gendy, S. M.; A. A. El-Badawi. "Aspergillus fumigatus as a contaminant in blue-veined cheese production". http://www.fstadirect.com/GetRecord.aspx?AN=1976-10-P-1990. Retrieved 11 June 2009. 
  3. ^ Škrinjar Marija, M. et al.. "Frequency of Aspergillus fumigatus fres.: A toxigenic and allergenic fungal species in milking cows feeds throughout one research year". http://www.doiserbia.nbs.bg.ac.yu/Article.aspx?id=0352-49060916101S&AspxAutoDetectCookieSupport=1. Retrieved 11 June 2009. 

External links

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Simple English

Dairy products are foods that are made from animal milk. Usually, they are made from cows and goats, but they can be made from other animals as well.

Dairy products include milk, butter, cheese, yogurt, and ice cream.

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