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Dan Glickman


In office
March 30, 1995 – January 19, 2001
President Bill Clinton
Preceded by Mike Espy
Succeeded by Ann Veneman

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Kansas's 4th district
In office
January 3, 1977 – January 3, 1995
Preceded by Garner E. Shriver
Succeeded by Todd Tiahrt

Born November 24, 1944 (1944-11-24) (age 65)
Wichita, Kansas
Political party Democratic
Alma mater University of Michigan
George Washington University Law School
Religion Judaism

Daniel Robert "Dan" Glickman (born November 24, 1944) is a Jewish businessman and politician. He served as the United States Secretary of Agriculture from 1995 until 2001, prior to which he represented the Fourth Congressional District of Kansas as a Democrat in Congress for 18 years. He is currently the Chairman and CEO of the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA).

He also serves on the board of directors of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange[1] and the board of Friends of the World Food Program [2]. Glickman is a Freemason.[3]

Contents

Early life

Glickman was born in Wichita, Kansas. The Glickman family operated Glickman Inc., a full-service scrap metal operation, since 1915 and Kansas Metal, an automobile and appliance shredder, since 1994. Glickman Inc. was founded by Jacob Glickman and later continued and expanded by Milton and Bill Glickman. With the death of Milton Glickman, Dan's father, in December 1999, Dan and his siblings Norman and Sharon Glickman carried on the family business until it was sold in 2002.

Glickman graduated from Wichita Southeast High School in 1962.[4] He graduated from University of Michigan with a B.A. in History in 1966, where he was a classmate with one of Al Gore's Chiefs of Staff, Charles Burson[5], and received his J.D. from The George Washington University Law School in 1969.

Legal career

In 1969 and 1970, Glickman worked as a trial attorney for the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, then was a partner in a law firm, Sargent, Klenda and Glickman. Between 1973 and 1976 he served as president of the Wichita School Board.

Political career

In 1976, he was elected to the House of Representatives as a Democrat from Kansas, defeating an eight-term Republican incumbent. Glickman was a leading congressional expert on general aviation policy and wrote landmark legislation providing product liability protection for small airplane manufacturers. In his final term, he was the chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. He held open hearings to bring the intelligence community's post–Cold War activities to light and began a committee investigation into the Aldrich Ames espionage case. He was defeated for reelection, by Todd Tiahrt, in the 1994 congressional elections, one of 34 Democrats to lose their seats. Part of Glickman's loss was attributed to the fact Kansas lost one House seat following the 1990 Census, shifting the city of Hutchinson out of the 4th District and into the more conservative First District (the "Big First"), and moving rural areas east of Wichita into the 4th.Tiahrt continues to hold the seat as of 2009.

Following his defeat, he was appointed by President Bill Clinton to be the Secretary of Agriculture, where he served from 1995 to 2001. After Clinton's term ended, Glickman became the director of the Institute of Politics at Harvard University.

MPAA work

In 2004, the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) announced that Glickman would replace Jack Valenti as its chief lobbyist[6]. Glickman now serves as Chairman and CEO of the MPAA,[7].

In a MPAA press release, May 31, 2006, entitled "Swedish Authorities Sink Pirate Bay", Dan Glickman states

“The actions today taken in Sweden serve as a reminder to pirates all over the world that there are no safe harbours for Internet copyright thieves”[8]

In the 2007 documentary "Good Copy Bad Copy" Glickman is interviewed in connection with the 2006 raid on The Pirate Bay by the Swedish police, conceding that piracy will never be stopped, but stating that they will try to make it as difficult and tedious as possible.[9]

In October 2009, Glickman announced he would step down as head of the MPAA when his contract expires in September 2010.[10]

References

External links

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Garner E. Shriver
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Kansas's 4th congressional district

1977–1995
Succeeded by
Todd Tiahrt
Political offices
Preceded by
Dave McCurdy
Oklahoma
Chairman of House Intelligence Committee
1993–1995
Succeeded by
Larry Combest
Texas
Preceded by
Mike Espy
United States Secretary of Agriculture
1995–2001
Succeeded by
Ann M. Veneman
Non-profit organization positions
Preceded by
Jack Valenti
President of the MPAA
2004–present
Succeeded by
Incumbent
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Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

Daniel Robert Glickman (born November 24, 1944) is an American politician. He served as the United States Secretary of Agriculture from 1995 until 2001, prior to which he represented the Fourth Congressional District of Kansas as a Democrat in Congress for 18 years. He is currently the president of the Motion Picture Association of America.

Sourced

  • What I saw generically on the pro-biotech side was the attitude that the technology was good and that it was almost immoral to say that it wasn't good because it was going to solve the problems of the human race and feed the hungry and clothe the naked. And there was a lot of money that had been invested in this, and if you're against it, you're Luddites, you're stupid. There was rhetoric like that even here in this department. You felt like you were almost an alien, disloyal, by trying to present an open-minded view on some of the issues being raised. So I pretty much spouted the rhetoric that everybody else around here spouted; it was written into my speeches.

External links

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