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Dan Marino

Marino preparing for an ESPN interview.
No. 13     
Quarterback
Personal information
Date of birth: September 15, 1961 (1961-09-15) (age 48)
Place of birth: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
High School: Central Catholic High School
Height: 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m) Weight: 228 lb (103 kg)
Career information
College: Pittsburgh
NFL Draft: 1983 / Round: 1 / Pick: 27
Debuted in 1983 for the Miami Dolphins
Last played in 1999 for the Miami Dolphins
Career history
 As player:
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics as of 1999
Pass attempts     8,358
Pass completions     4,967
Percentage     59.4
TD-INT     420-252
Passing yards     61,361
QB Rating     86.4
Stats at NFL.com
Pro Football Hall of Fame
College Football Hall of Fame

Daniel Constantine Marino, Jr. (born September 15, 1961) is an American Hall of Fame quarterback who played for the Miami Dolphins in the National Football League. The last quarterback of the Quarterback Class of 1983 to be taken in the first round, Marino became one of the most prolific quarterbacks in league history, holding or having held almost every major NFL passing record. Despite never being on a Super Bowl-winning team, he is recognized as one of the greatest quarterbacks in American football history. Remembered particularly for having a quick release and a powerful arm, Marino led the Dolphins into the playoffs on numerous occasions.

Contents

Early years

Marino was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, of Italian and Polish ancestry. He attended St. Regis Catholic Elementary School before going to Central Catholic High School in Pittsburgh, where he also started in baseball, and won Parade All-American honors in football. As a high school baseball player, Marino hit high school highs by throwing up to 95 mph[citation needed]. He was drafted by the Kansas City Royals baseball team in the 1979 amateur draft, but decided to play college football instead.

College career

Marino quarterbacking the University of Pittsburgh as a freshman in 1979, the first of three straight 11-1 seasons for the Panthers

Marino played college football at the University of Pittsburgh from the 1979 to the 1982 season. As a freshman in 1979, Marino led the Panthers in a 24-17 triumph over West Virginia in the Backyard Brawl with 252 yards and a field goal. Marino threw for 256 yards and also rushed for 40 yards. He led the Panthers to a last-minute triumph over the Georgia Bulldogs in the 1982 Sugar Bowl by throwing the game-winning pass to tight end John Brown with less than a minute remaining, a play that is considered among the greatest in Pittsburgh sports history. The next season (his senior year) was considered a disappointment with regard to the preseason Heisman Trophy and national championship hype. His team lost the 1983 Cotton Bowl Classic 7-3 to Southern Methodist and their "Pony Express" of Eric Dickerson and Craig James. Although he lost the Heisman Race, Marino's Panthers triumphed once again over rival West Virginia with a late touchdown drive to win 16-13 in one of the best games in the rivalry.

Marino's selection status in the 1983 NFL Draft plummeted after a subpar senior season at Pitt, and observations that knee injuries were hampering his mobility. Five other quarterbacks, including Hall of Famers Jim Kelly and John Elway and less successful players Ken O'Brien, Tony Eason and Todd Blackledge, were drafted ahead of him.

Professional career

On Jan. 4, 1983, the Los Angeles Express made Marino the first draft pick in the history of the United States Football League. Marino never signed a contract with this team.

His hometown NFL team, the Pittsburgh Steelers, were also thought to be considering him for a replacement for the veteran Terry Bradshaw at quarterback, but the Steelers drafted the defensive tackle Gabriel Rivera from Texas Tech University, instead, considering at that time that either Cliff Stoudt or Mark Malone, both already on their roster, could someday replace Bradshaw.

The defending American Football Conference Champion Miami Dolphins chose Marino with the 27th pick in the NFL draft. After starting the season as a backup to incumbent starter David Woodley and seeing action twice off the bench to relieve an ineffective Woodley, Marino was given his first NFL start in Week 6 versus the Buffalo Bills at the Orange Bowl. Marino and Miami lost that game 38–35 in OT. He posted a 96.0 passer rating- a rookie record until it was broken by Ben Roethlisberger's 98.1. He was selected to the Pro Bowl in his rookie year and became the first rookie QB to start in a Pro Bowl game.[1] However, Marino's first NFL season ended in disappointment, as the Dolphins were upset by the Seattle Seahawks 27-20 in a rain-soaked game full of Miami turnovers. Marino looked shaky in that game, mostly due to a sprained knee he had suffered three weeks prior versus the Houston Oilers, an injury that caused him to miss the last two regular season games. Those two games were the last non-strike games that he missed, until he tore his Achilles tendon in 1993. Marino started a streak of 145 consecutive, non-strike, NFL games as the Dolphins quarterback.

The following year, Marino produced one of the greatest seasons for a quarterback in NFL history. He broke six NFL full-season passing records, including the records for most touchdown passes, 48, in a season and most passing yards (5,084) in a season. Marino was also selected as the NFL's Most Valuable Player. Miami's passing attack propelled the Dolphins to a 14–2 regular season record, which clinched for them the home-field advantage in all the following playoff games. In the first round, the Dolphins avenged their playoff loss of the previous season to Seattle Seahawks 31–10, and then they defeated the Pittsburgh Steelers in the AFC Championship Game 45–28. This win sent the Dolphins to the Super Bowl to play for the overall championship.

In Super Bowl XIX, Marino and the Dolphins faced off against San Francisco 49ers and their star quarterback Joe Montana in Palo Alto, California. The Dolphins, who had 74 rushing attempts in the previous two weeks, ran the ball only eight times in this game, placing their chances of winning squarely on the passing of Marino. He finished with 29 completions out of 50 attempts for 318 yards, throwing one touchdown pass and two interceptions. This was not enough, because the 49ers outplayed the Dolphins on both sides of the ball. The 38–16 loss would prove to be Marino's only Super Bowl appearance.

In the following football season, Marino's Dolphins collected a 12-4 record. On December 2, 1985 Marino completed 14 of 27 passes for 270 yards and three touchdown passes and triumphed 38–24 over the 12–0 Chicago Bears (thus ensuring that the 1972 Miami Dolphins remained the only team to go undefeated in a season) in the highest rated Monday Night Football telecast in history. He also brought the Dolphins back to the AFC Championship game that year, losing in Miami to New England in another game in which wet conditions made the Dolphins turnover prone. New England intercepted Marino twice and recovered four fumbles en route to a 31-14 win over the Dolphins, their first win in the Miami Orange Bowl since 1966.

With Marino at the helm, the Dolphins were perennial playoff contenders, reaching the post-season in 10 of Marino's 17 seasons. In 1992 he made his final appearance in an AFC Championship Game, losing to arch-rival Jim Kelly and the Buffalo Bills, 29-10. Kelly's Bills knocked Marino out of the playoffs three times between 1990 and 1995.

The following year, 1993, Miami was strongly favored at the start of the year to make it back to the AFC championship game and possibly the Super Bowl. However, disaster struck Marino and the Dolphins in Cleveland. After throwing a swing pass, Marino, who was untouched on the play, crumpled to the ground in pain with a torn Achilles tendon and was out for the season. Marino later said, "I felt like I'd been shot". Complicating matters was that in Marino's absence, backup quarterback Scott Mitchell had an impressive series of starts before suffering an injury of his own. As a result, for the first time in a decade, Miami had a quarterback controversy in the media and among its fans: to keep the younger Mitchell (who became a free agent after the season) or the proven veteran Marino, for whom it was feared he could not recover completely from the injury.

In the end, Miami, after losing the last five games of the season and missing the playoffs , decided to continue with Marino as their primary quarterback. Mitchell signed a free-agent contract with the Detroit Lions, and for a new back-up quarterback, Miami signed-up the veteran quarterback Bernie Kosar from the Cleveland Browns. Wearing a special shoe on one foot, and having a right calf that was visibly atrophied, Marino once again became the starting QB at the start of the 1994 season.

In 1994, a season where Marino's viability was very much a question mark from the outset, two of his signature games took place. The first was the opener, a home game versus the New England Patriots and their upstart quarterback Drew Bledsoe, who drew more than a few comparisons to a young Marino. It had rained heavily that day, and the baseball infield used by the Florida Marlins was muddy as a result. Despite the conditions, the two quarterbacks put up a combined 894 yards and nine touchdowns through the air, with Miami winning a 39–35 shootout. The other was the comeback win on the road against the New York Jets, a game famous for Marino's execution of a fake spike for the winning touchdown pass, a stunt known simply as "The Clock Play". The Dolphins amassed a 10–6 record that year, winning the division and defeating the Joe Montana-led Kansas City Chiefs at home (exacting some revenge on Montana for Super Bowl XIX) before losing a heart breaker at the San Diego Chargers 22–21 the following week after leading 21–6 at halftime. That season, Marino passed for 4,435 yards and was named the NFL's Comeback Player of the Year.

Marino went no further than the divisional round of the playoffs through the remainder of his career. Longtime coach Don Shula resigned after the 1995 season. He was replaced by Jimmy Johnson, whose ball-control philosophy had worked to the tune of two championships with the Dallas Cowboys and who guaranteed a Super Bowl win in Miami. Johnson attempted to emphasize Miami's ground game, but in his four seasons as coach of the Dolphins he never found a running back, despite trying several players at the position.

Now more injury prone and less consistent than he had been at the peak of his abilities, Marino's decline became evident at a Thanksgiving game in 1999 versus the Cowboys. In his first game back after missing a month due to injury, Marino threw five interceptions in the Dolphins 20-0 loss. The Dolphins then proceeded to back into the playoffs by losing four out of their next five games to finish the season at 9–7.

Marino's final win was his first playoff road win and his 36th comeback win, as the Dolphins defeated the Seattle Seahawks 20–17 in January 2000 in the final football game ever in the Kingdome. In the next round, also on the road, Marino and the Dolphins were demolished 62–7 by the Jacksonville Jaguars. Marino was replaced by backup Damon Huard in the second half, an ignominious end to a spectacular career. However, he did leave the game on a high note, leading the Dolphins on an 80-yard scoring drive and throwing a 20-yard touchdown pass to receiver Oronde Gadsden with 20 seconds left in the half.

The Jacksonville loss thus put Marino's playoff record at a mediocre 8–10.

Before the 2000 season, Marino decided to retire,[2] after declining offers from Minnesota, Tampa Bay and his hometown of Pittsburgh when the Dolphins declined his option on his contract. When asked at his retirement press conference why he decided to retire, he responded:

That is a good question. Boy, I really struggled with this. This has been the toughest month of my life as far as dealing with playing football or retiring. After the season, I pretty much thought that I was not going to play anymore and I felt that way for a while and I think it was because of the physical aspects of the game. It kept coming back to how my legs felt during last season, going through the neck injury; not knowing whether I was going to be able to throw the football, and family reasons also, but Claire and the kids, they were great. They wanted me to play, be honest with you. Really, it was my decision, a family decision and a health decision.

Marino later admitted that he seriously considered the offer from the Vikings, but that he turned it down not because of his arm, but because he wasn't sure that his legs could take another season. He also appreciated the fact that unlike many of his contemporaries, he got to play his entire career with one team.

During Marino's professional career (1983–1999) in Miami, he was one of the most skilled and revered quarterbacks in the game. Marino's release was incredibly quick, one of his most important weapons. Also, despite the fact that he was not known for his scrambling ability (he averaged less than 1 yard per carry on his 301 career rushing attempts), Marino possessed an uncanny awareness in the pocket, often sliding a step or two to avoid the pass rush. He has the most fourth quarter comebacks (36) in the history of the NFL, and the third most wins by a starting quarterback (147). John Elway and Brett Favre are ahead in overall wins.

The last game that Marino had won was a Wild-Card Game against the Seattle Seahawks in the Kingdome in 2000

Marino was selected to play in nine Pro Bowls (1983-87, 1991-92, 1994-95), seven times as a starter, but due to injuries he only played in two of the games (1984, 1992). (Marino usually had knee surgery following every season.) He was named first- or second-team All-Pro eight times and earned All-AFC honors six times.

In 1999, Marino was ranked number 27 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Football Players, making him the highest-ranking Dolphins player.[3]

Life outside football

A life-size bronze statue of Marino at Sun Life Stadium.

On Sunday, September 17, 2000, at halftime of the Dolphins-Baltimore Ravens game at Pro Player Stadium, Dan Marino’s jersey number, 13, was retired. The only other Dolphins jersey number retired at the time was Bob Griese's #12. Since then #39, Larry Csonka, has been retired as well. Marino joined the Dolphins Honor Roll the same day. In a year of accolades from the franchise he led for many years, the Dolphins also installed a life-size bronze statue of Marino at Pro Player Stadium (now Land Shark Stadium) and renamed Stadium Street, Dan Marino Boulevard.[4]

In 2003, Marino was honored for his outstanding NCAA career at Pitt with an induction into the College Football Hall of Fame.

In early 2004, Dan Marino briefly returned to the Miami Dolphins as Senior Vice President of Football Operations, but resigned from the newly-created position only three weeks later, saying that the role was not in the best interest of either his family or the Dolphin organization.

Marino was a first-ballot selection to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2005. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame on August 7, 2005 and was introduced by his oldest son, Daniel. During his induction speech, Dan threw "one last pass" to former teammate Mark Clayton, who was sitting in the audience (Marino had intended to throw the ball to Clayton as the two had planned the action prior to the event).

Marino lives with his wife, Claire, and their six children, Daniel Charles (b. 4 September 1986), Michael Joseph (b. 18 May 1988), Joseph Donald (b. 26 July 1989), Alexandra Claire (b. 13 May 1992), Lia (b. 12 July 1995 in China) and Niki Lin (b. 15 December 1996 in China) in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. He also has vacation homes in Kiawah Island, South Carolina.

During the football season Marino is a commentator for CBS's The NFL Today show. He was formerly a studio analyst on HBO's Inside the NFL.

Marino also acted in the 1994 comedy Ace Ventura: Pet Detective alongside Jim Carrey and Courteney Cox (he played himself) and made a cameo appearance in the Adam Sandler film Little Nicky where he asked Satan for a Super Bowl ring. He even guest-starred as himself in The Simpsons episode Sunday, Cruddy Sunday (first aired January 31, 1999). Marino also had cameo roles in Holy Man and Bad Boys II. He also worked as a project consultant on Any Given Sunday, and some observers noticed a resemblance between him and Dennis Quaid's character, Jack Rooney.[5] In fact, Rooney's house in the film is Marino's house in real life.[6] The music world marked another appearance for Marino, when he was featured in a video by Hootie and the Blowfish.

Marino opened two restaurants in South Florida called Dan Marino's Town Tavern, with one location in Coral Springs and one on Las Olas Boulevard in Fort Lauderdale. The name changed around 2005 to Dan Marino's Fine Food and Spirits. By 2006, both original locations had closed, but, as of January, 2007, the restaurant had opened other locations in Miami, St. Petersburg, Las Vegas, NV, and Orlando. The Orlando location was closed and scheduled to re-open sometime in early 2007.[7]

Marino is currently featured in advertisement campaigns for Hooters, NutriSystem weight loss programs,[8] Maroone car dealerships, Papa John's, Viagra, and Empi Select (a TENS device).[9] Previously, Marino endorsed Isotoner gloves and FirstPlus Mortgage who he later filed suit against.[10]

Marino is an Advisory Board Member for 3Cinteractive. 3Cinteractive is a Florida based Mobile Marketing Development company.[11]

In 1997, Marino became involved in a marketing role with Team Cheever of the Indy Racing League through FirstPlus Mortgage, the sponsor of the car. In 1998, Marino co-owned a NASCAR Winston Cup racing team with driver Bill Elliott. The team's car number was #13, Marino's uniform number, and had primary sponsorship from FirstPlus Mortgage, whose company colors, coincidentally, were turquoise, orange, and white, the same as the Miami Dophins. The team chose rookie driver Jerry Nadeau to pilot the car at the start of the season; he was later released and the team went through a rotation of drivers. The team failed to qualify for several races, but did post a top-5 finish at Phoenix International Raceway late in the season with Ted Musgrave driving. The team only lasted the 1998 season and closed afterwards.

On April 27, 2008, Marino received an honorary doctorate degree in broadcast journalism from his Alma Mater, The University of Pittsburgh. Marino also delivered the Class of 2008 commencement speech.[12]

Dan Marino Foundation

The Dan Marino Foundation, was established in 1992 by Marino and his wife, Claire, after their son, Michael, was diagnosed with autism.[13] The foundation has distributed over $22 million to research, services and treatment programs serving children with neurodevelopment disabilities. The Dan Marino Center, which opened in 1995 along with the Miami Children's Hospital, is an integrated neurodevelopmental center specializing in the diagnosis and treatment of children at risk for developmental and psychological problems. The center saw more than 48,000 children last year alone.

Marino has teamed with other celebrities to raise awareness about autism spectrum disorders, including fellow NFL great Doug Flutie, whose son also has an autism diagnosis.

On November 7, 2005, the National Basketball Association's Miami Heat honored Marino's charitable works and recognized his service to South Florida with a halftime tribute, including a large donation to the Marino Foundation. Though a Heat jersey with his name and #13 was unveiled, this did not constitute retirement of his number by the Heat.[13]

NFL records set by Dan Marino

(Note: This list documents records set by Dan Marino at the time of his retirement following the 1999 season. Some of the records have since been broken.)

  • Most Attempts, Career: 8,358 (surpassed by Brett Favre in 2007)
  • Most Completions, Career: 4,967 (surpassed by Brett Favre in 2006)
  • Most Yards Passing, Career: 61,361 (surpassed by Brett Favre in 2007)
  • Most Touchdown Passes, Career: 420 (surpassed by Brett Favre in 2007)
  • Most Yards Passing, Season: 5,084 in 1984
  • Most Touchdown Passes, Season: 48 in 1984 (surpassed by Peyton Manning (49) in 2004 and by Tom Brady (50) in 2007)
  • Most Games, 400 or more Yards Passing, Career: 13
  • Most Games, 400 or more Yards Passing, Season: 4 in 1984
  • Most Games, 300 or more Yards Passing, Career: 63
  • Most Seasons, 3,000 or more Yards Passing: 13 (1984-92, 1994-95, 1997-98) (surpassed by Brett Favre in 2005)
  • Most Consecutive Seasons, 3,000 or more Yards Passing: 9 (1984-92) (surpassed by Brett Favre in 2001)
  • Most Games, Four or more Touchdown Passes, Season: 6 in 1984 (tied by Peyton Manning in 2004)
  • Most Games, Three or more Touchdown Passes, Career: 62 (surpassed by Brett Favre in 2007)
  • Lowest Percentage, Passes Intercepted, Rookie Season: 2.03 in 1983 (296-6) [surpassed by Charlie Batch, Detroit, 1.98 in 1998 (303-6)]
  • Most Seasons Leading League, Attempts: 5 (1984, 1986, 1988, 1992, 1997)
  • Most Seasons Leading League, Completions: 6 (1984-86, 1988, 1992, 1997)
  • Most Seasons, 40 or more Touchdown Passes: 2 (1984, 1986)
  • 100 TD Passes in Fewest Number of Games to Start Career: 44 (9/7/1986 at San Diego)
  • 200 TD passes in Fewest Number of Games to Start Career: 89 (9/17/1989 at New England)
  • 300 TD passes in Fewest Number of Games to Start Career: 157 (9/4/1994 vs. New England) (tied by Peyton Manning in 2007)
  • 30,000 Career Passing Yards in Fewest Number of Games to Start Career: 114 (11/25/1990 at Cleveland) (tied by Kurt Warner, October 18, 2009)
  • Highest career TD-INT differential: +168 (surpassed by Peyton Manning in 2009)
  • Most 4th Quarter Comeback Wins, Career (playoffs included): 36 [14]
  • Most Games, Four or more Touchdown Passes, Career: 21 (tied by Peyton Manning and surpassed by Brett Favre in 2009)
  • Most Wins against one team: 24 against the Indianapolis Colts (surpassed by Brett Favre against the Detroit Lions in 2007)
  • Monday Night, Passing Yards: 9,654
  • Monday Night, Completions: 798
  • Monday Night, Attempts: 1,303
  • Monday Night, Touchdown Passes: 74

NFL records tied

  • Most Seasons Leading League, Yards Gained: 5 (1984-86, 1988, 1992) with Sonny Jurgensen (Philadelphia, 1961-62; Washington, 1966-67, 1969)
  • Most Consecutive Seasons Leading League, Completions: 3 (1984-86) with George Blanda (Houston, 1963-65)
  • Most Consecutive Games, 400 or more Yards Passing: 2 (1984) with Dan Fouts (San Diego, 1982), Phil Simms (N.Y. Giants, 1985), Billy Volek (Tennessee, 2004), Matt Cassel (New England, 2008)

Career stats

Regular season

 Year   Team
G
W
Comp
Att
Pct
Yds
YPA
Long
Td
Int
Rate
RAtt
RYds
RAvg
RTd
1983 Miami
11
7
173
296
58.4
2210
7.5
85
20
6
96.0
28
45
1.6
2
1984 Miami
16
14
362
564
64.2
5,084*
9.0
80
48
17
108.9
28
-7
-0.3
0
1985 Miami
16
12
336
567
59.3
4,137
7.3
73
30
21
84.1
26
-24
-0.9
0
1986 Miami
16
8
378
623
60.7
4,746
7.6
85
44
23
92.5
12
-3
-0.3
0
1987 Miami
13
7
263
444
59.2
3,245
7.3
59
26
13
89.2
12
-5
-0.4
1
1988 Miami
16
6
354
606
58.4
4,434
7.3
80
28
23
80.8
20
-17
-0.9
0
1989 Miami
16
8
308
550
56.0
3,997
7.3
78
24
22
76.9
14
-7
-0.5
2
1990 Miami
16
12
306
531
57.6
3,563
6.7
69
21
11
82.6
16
29
1.8
0
1991 Miami
16
8
318
549
57.9
3,970
7.2
54
25
13
85.8
27
32
1.2
1
1992 Miami
16
11
330
554
59.6
4,116
7.4
62
24
16
85.1
20
66
3.3
0
1993 Miami
5
4
91
150
60.7
1,218
8.1
80
8
3
95.9
9
-4
-0.4
1
1994 Miami
16
10
385
615
62.6
4,453
7.2
64
30
17
89.2
22
-6
-0.3
1
1995 Miami
14
9
309
482
64.1
3,668
7.6
67
24
15
90.8
11
14
1.3
0
1996 Miami
13
7
221
373
59.2
2,795
7.5
74
17
9
87.8
11
-3
-0.3
0
1997 Miami
16
9
319
548
58.2
3,780
6.9
55
16
11
80.7
18
-14
-0.8
0
1998 Miami
16
10
310
537
57.7
3,497
6.5
61
23
15
80.0
21
-3
-0.1
1
1999 Miami
11
5
204
369
55.3
2,448
6.6
62
12
17
67.4
6
-6
-1.0
0
Career
G
W
Comp
Att
Pct
Yds
YPA
Long
TD
Int
Rate
RAtt
RYds
RAvg
RTds
17 Years
242
147
4,967
8,358
59.4
61,361
7.3
85
420
252
86.4
301
87
0.3
9

League Leader * NFL Record

  • Named NFL Most Valuable Player (1984).
  • Played 242 games, starting 240 of them.
  • First QB in NFL history to have six 4,000-yard seasons (1984–86, 1988, 1992, 1994).
  • First QB in NFL history to pass for 5,000 or more yards in a single season (5,084 in 1984).
  • Only QB in NFL history to throw 40+ TD passes in a season twice (48 in 1984, 44 in 1986)…only 3 other QB's have done it once.
  • Led 36 fourth-quarter comeback victories, second most all-time.
  • Holds Dolphins team record for most seasons played (17).
  • Had 116 wins under Don Shula – the most by a head coach/quarterback combination in NFL history.
  • Won the AFC Offensive Player of the Week honor 18 times in the regular season (and 20 times overall, including playoffs).
  • Compiled a 147-93 regular-season record as a starter, third best all-time.
  • Of his 63 career games with 300+ yards passing, 11 came against the Jets(including his final 300-yd game); he had 8 against the Colts(who were in the AFC EAST during Marino's career), and 7 apiece against the Patriots and Bills…meaning Marino picked up 33 of his 63 career 300-yd performances against division foes. Incredibly, of Marino's 13 career games with 400+ passing yards, 4 came against the Jets…the other 9 came against 9 different teams.
  • For perspective, his 61,361 career passing yards is the equivalent of having passed his way across the state of Rhode Island.

Playoff stats

 Year   Team
G
W
Comp
Att
Pct
Yds
YPA
Long
Td
Int
Rate
RAtt
RYds
RAvg
RTd
1983 Miami
1
0
15
25
60.0
193
7.5
2
2
77.6
0
0
0.0
0
1984 Miami
3
2
71
116
61.2
1001
8.6
8
5
94.1
1
0
0.0
0
1985 Miami
2
1
45
93
48.4
486
5.2
3
3
61.5
1
0
0.0
0
1990 Miami
2
1
42
79
53.2
544
6.9
5
2
85.6
5
-1
-0.2
1
1992 Miami
2
1
39
74
52.7
335
4.5
4
2
71.6
1
-2
-0.5
0
1994 Miami
2
1
46
67
68.7
519
7.7
5
0
116.5
2
4
2.0
0
1995 Miami
1
0
33
64
51.6
422
6.6
2
3
63.4
1
0
0.0
0
1997 Miami
1
0
17
43
39.5
141
3.3
0
2
29.3
1
2
2.0
0
1998 Miami
2
1
49
71
69.0
478
7.2
1
3
74.7
1
-1
-1.0
0
1999 Miami
2
1
28
55
50.9
291
7.4
2
2
63.5
2
-1
-0.5
0
Career
G
W
Comp
Att
Pct
Yds
YPA
Long
TD
Int
Rate
RAtt
RYds
RAvg
RTds
10 Years
18
8
385
687
56.0
4,510
6.6
32
24
77.1
15
1
0.07
1

Stats Unknown

See also

References

External links


Simple English

Dan Marino
Position(s):
Quarterback
Jersey #(s):
13
Born: September 15, 1961 (1961-09-15) (age 49)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Career Information
Year(s): 1983–2001
NFL Draft: 1983 / Round: 1 / Pick: 27
College: Pittsburgh
Professional Teams
Career Stats
TD-INT     420-252
Yards     61,361
QB Rating     86.4
Stats at NFL.com
Career Highlights and Awards
  • 9x Pro Bowl selection (1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1991, 1992, 1994, 1995)
  • 8x All-Pro selection (1983, 1984, 1985, 1986, 1988, 1992, 1994, 1995)
  • 1984 NFL MVP
  • 1984 PFWA MVP
  • 1984 NEA MVP
  • 1984 NFL Offensive Player of the Year
  • 1994 UPI AFL-AFC Player of the Year
  • 1984 UPI AFL-AFC Player of the Year
  • 1998 Walter Payton Man of the Year
  • 1994 NFL Comeback Player of the Year
  • Holds 31 Miami Dolphins records
  • Holds Numerous NFL records
Pro Football Hall of Fame
College Football Hall of Fame

Daniel Constantine Marino, Jr. (born September 15, 1961) is a Hall of Fame quarterback who played for the Miami Dolphins in the National Football League. Many think of him as one of the greatest quarterbacks ever.

Marino started his career playing for University of Pittsburgh as a quarterback. Marino finished his career with the university having thrown 74 touchdown passes. In 2002 he was voted into the College Football Hall of Fame. He had a long and successful career as a quarterback for the Miami Dolphins, breaking many passing records but never leading his team to win the NFL Super Bowl.








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