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A dance party in session.

Dance parties or rave parties are gatherings in private houses, bars,[1] nightclubs or community centres where the guests informally dance to dance music such as pop, disco, electronica, house, techno and trance. The music for dance parties is usually selected and played by a disk jockey (DJ) over a public address (PA) system or a powerful sound system of some kind. Conversation is not an integral part of these parties as those who attend express themselves through their dancing and by gesturing.

Popularity

Dance parties are popular amongst teenagers, to the point that many dance parties are held specifically for teenagers in nightclubs or other locations, who in some countries are unable to attend such places alone due to local laws.[2]

Ambience

Dance parties are usually held at night, using partially visual and lighting effects that would not work correctly during the day, such as strobe lighting and smoke machines.

Some people who go to dance parties take illegal drugs such as MDMA ("Ecstasy") to evoke powerful emotions of unity and empathy, and as such, dance parties have at various times attracted media and police attention.[3]

References

  1. ^ "September dance party". minus18.org.au. 2008-08-04. http://www.minus18.org.au/joomla/index.php?option=com_magazine&func=show_article&id=45. Retrieved 2009-01-17.  
  2. ^ Lygopoulos, Anna (2007-10-19). "Minors on licensed premises". Consumer Affairs Victoria. http://www.consumer.vic.gov.au/CA256EB5000644CE/page/Listing-Liquor-Minors+on+licensed+premises?OpenDocument&1=75-Liquor~&2=0-Liquor~&3=~. Retrieved 2009-01-18.  
  3. ^ John, Graham (2004). Rave Culture and Religion. London: Tourledge. p. 91. ISBN 0415314496.  







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