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Dankmar Adler

Temple Isaiah, designed by Adler, circa 1910
Born July 3, 1844(1844-07-03)
Germany
Died April 16, 1900 (aged 55)
Chicago, Illinois
Occupation Architect

Dankmar Adler (July 3, 1844 in Stadtlengsfeld, Germany – April 16, 1900 in Chicago, Illinois, U.S.) was an American architect.

Adler was a civil engineer who, with his partner Louis Sullivan, designed many buildings including the Guaranty Building in Buffalo, New York[1], the Chicago Stock Exchange Building (1894-1972) and the Auditorium Building (1889), an early example of acoustical engineering, and the Kehilath Anshe Ma'ariv Synagogue. [2] Although Alder was acclaimed as an expert in acoustics, he was ultimately unable to explain the excellent acoustic properties of his buildings. [3] The firm of Adler and Sullivan was instrumental in rebuilding Chicago after the Great Chicago Fire and was the leader in the Chicago school of architecture. In addition to his own accomplishments with steel-framed buildings and skyscrapers, he, as a partner of Louis Sullivan, was close to the man Frank Lloyd Wright called "lieber meister".

The last major building Adler designed was Temple Isaiah.

Photographs and other archival materials are held by the Ryerson & Burnham Libraries at the Art Institute of Chicago. The Dankmar Adler Collection of letters, papers, and photographs also includes an autobiography.

References

  1. ^ Roth, Leland M. (1993). Understanding Architecture: Its Elements, History and Meaning (First ed.). Boulder, CO: Westview Press. pp. 450. ISBN 0-06-430158-3.  
  2. ^ Roth, Leland M. (1993). Understanding Architecture: Its Elements, History and Meaning (First ed.). Boulder, CO: Westview Press. pp. 100. ISBN 0-06-430158-3.  
  3. ^ Thompson, Emily (2002). The Soundscape of Modernity (First ed.). Massachusetts, USA. pp. 499. ISBN 0-262-20138-0.  

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