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For the ship, see Italian battleship Dante Alighieri.
Dante Alighieri
.head-and-chest side portrait of Dante in red and white coat and cowl
Dante Alighieri, painted by Giotto in the chapel of the Bargello palace in Florence.
^ And he portrayed among other persons, as may even now be seen, in the chapel of the Palace of the Podesta in Florence, Dante Alighieri, his contemporary and greatest friend, who was not less famous a poet than Giotto was painter in those days.
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^ On the altar- wall of the chapel of the Palace of the Podesta (now the Bargello) Giotto painted a grand religious composition, in which, after the fashion of the times, he exalted the glory of Florence by the introduction of some of her most famous citizens into the assembly of the blessed in Paradise.
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^ In May of 1265, Dante Alighieri, of a family too unimportant or insufficiently Guelph to have been exiled from Florence, was born.
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This oldest portrait of Dante was painted during his lifetime before his exile from his native city.
Born mid-May to mid-June 1265
Florence
Died September 14, 1321 (aged about 56)
Ravenna
Occupation Statesman, poet, language theorist
Nationality Italian
.Dante Alighieri (May/June c.1265 – September 14, 1321), commonly known as Dante, was an Italian poet of the Middle Ages.^ Dante Alighieri 1265 1321 .
  • University of Colorado at Boulder /All Locations 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC libraries.colorado.edu [Source type: Academic]

^ Dante Italian poet in full Dante Alighieri .
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante's death, September 14, 1321.
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.The name Dante is, according to the words of Jacopo Alighieri, a hypocorism for Durante.^ Among these names was that of Dante Alighieri, whose exclusion was '^E^islola vii.
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^ DANTE. Dante (or Durante) Alighieri (1265-1321) was born at Florence about the middle of May 1265.
  • Dante Alighieri. Italian poet (1265-1321) 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

.In contemporary documents it is followed by the patronymic Alagherii or de Alagheriis; it was Boccaccio who popularized the form Alighieri.^ IN his Life of Dante Boccaccio gives the following description of Dante's person and character^ which was derived no doubt in part from the recollections of those who had been personally acquainted with the poet at Ravenna.
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.His Divine Comedy, originally called Commedia by the author and later nicknamed Divina by Boccaccio, is often considered the greatest literary work composed in the Italian language and a masterpiece of world literature.^ The Divine Comedy (Italian: Commedia , later christened " Divina " by Giovanni Boccaccio), written by Dante Alighieri between 1308 and his death in 1321, is widely considered the central epic poem of Italian literature, the last great work of literature of the Middle Ages and the first great work of the Renaissance, and one of the greatest works of world literature.
  • Divine Comedy - Monstropedia - the largest encyclopedia about monsters 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.monstropedia.org [Source type: General]

^ A master's works Okay, everyone has heard of the "Divine Comedy," the medieval masterwork of legendary poet Dante Alighieri.
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^ This work con- I The first printed edition of the F'ita Nuova appeared at Florence in 1576, more than a hundred years later than the first edition of the Divina Commedia.
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[1]
In Italy he is known as "the Supreme Poet" (il Sommo Poeta) or just il Poeta. .Dante, Petrarch and Boccaccio are also known as "the three fountains" or "the three crowns". Dante is also called the "Father of the Italian language". The first biography written on him was by Giovanni Boccaccio (1313-1375), who wrote the Trattatello in laude di Dante.^ Dante, the father of this Leonardo, died in 1428.
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^ This masterpiece was written in Italian, but Dante also wrote in Latin, the language of scholarship at that time.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The Divine Comedy (Italian: Commedia , later christened " Divina " by Giovanni Boccaccio), written by Dante Alighieri between 1308 and his death in 1321, is widely considered the central epic poem of Italian literature, the last great work of literature of the Middle Ages and the first great work of the Renaissance, and one of the greatest works of world literature.
  • Divine Comedy - Monstropedia - the largest encyclopedia about monsters 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.monstropedia.org [Source type: General]

[2]

Contents

Life

.The exact date of Dante's birth is not known, although it is generally believed to be around 1265. This can be deduced from autobiographic allusions in La Divina Commedia, "the Inferno" (Halfway through the journey we are living, implying that Dante was around 35 years old, as the average lifespan according to the Bible (Psalms 89:10, Vulgate) is 70 years, and as the imaginary travel took place in 1300 Dante must have been born around 1265).^ Dante was born in 1265 in Florence.
  • Dante Alighieri (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Divina comedia, La by Dante Alighieri .
  • Geometry.Net - Celebrities Books: Alighieri Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

^ Dante places the date of the action of the poem in the Jubilee year 1300.
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.Some verses of the Paradiso section of the Divine Comedy also provide a possible clue that he was born under the sign of Gemini - "As I revolved with the eternal twins, I saw revealed from hills to river outlets, the threshing-floor that makes us so ferocious", XXII 151-154), but these cannot be considered definitive statements by Dante about his birth.^ Paradiso Canto XXII:100-154 .
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri - IndexAB. 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC poetryintranslation.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante's Divine comedy .
  • Dante's Divine comedy - Civilization Fanatics' Forums 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC forums.civfanatics.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Wonder request - Dante's Divine comedy .
  • Dante's Divine comedy - Civilization Fanatics' Forums 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC forums.civfanatics.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.However, in 1265 the Sun was in Gemini approximately during the period 11 May to 11 June.^ The main bridge across this Bolge was knocked down during Christ's descent into Hell; however, there are alternative bridges that may be used to cross.

^ He was born in Florence in 1265 under the sign of Gemini (between May 21 and June 20) and remained devoted to his native city all his life.
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.His birth date is listed as "probably in the end of May" by Robert Hollander in "Dante" in Dictionary of the Middle Ages, volume 4. In summary, most students of Dante's life believe that he was born between about the middle of May and about the middle of June 1265, but there is little likelihood a definite date will ever be known.^ Dante was born in 1265 in Florence.
  • Dante Alighieri (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante may be said to have concentrated in himself the spirit of the middle age.
  • Dante Alighieri. Italian poet (1265-1321) 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Early life and the Vita nuova Most of what is known about Dantes life he has told himself.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

A portrait of Dante, from a fresco in Palazzo dei Giudici, Florence
.Dante claimed that his family descended from the ancient Romans (Inferno, XV, 76), but the earliest relative he could mention by name was Cacciaguida degli Elisei (Paradiso, XV, 135), of no earlier than about 1100. Dante's father, Alighiero di Bellincione, was a White Guelph who suffered no reprisals after the Ghibellines won the Battle of Montaperti in the mid 13th century.^ It is the earliest of Dante's writings, and the 1 Fita di Dante.
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^ They are mentioned among the ancient Florentine families.
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri - IndexAB. 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC poetryintranslation.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In this sense and in no other was Dante a Ghibelline.
  • Dante Alighieri. Italian poet (1265-1321) 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

This suggests that Alighiero or his family enjoyed some protective prestige and status.
.Dante's family was prominent in Florence, with loyalties to the Guelphs, a political alliance that supported the Papacy and which was involved in complex opposition to the Ghibellines, who were backed by the Holy Roman Emperor.^ Guelph and Ghibelline parties in Florence."
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Born in 1265 to a noble family of Florence that, while not the city’s most prominent family, had already seen several of his ancestors banished as a result of political turmoil, Dante could hardly have avoided becoming embroiled in public life had he even wanted to.
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^ In brief, a long-running struggle between pro-imperial (the so-called Holy Roman Empire) and pro-papal factions was finally won by the pro-papal forces , known as the Guelphs.
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The poet's mother was Bella degli Abati. .She died when Dante was not yet ten years old, and Alighiero soon married again, to Lapa di Chiarissimo Cialuffi.^ Aquinas died circa 1274, when Dante was nine years old.
  • The University of Edward Masen Chapter 18, a Twilight fanfic - FanFiction.Net 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.fanfiction.net [Source type: Original source]

^ By his second wife, Lapa, daughter of Chiarissimo Cialuffi,i Alighiero had three children, a son Francesco, who survived his half-brother Dante more than twenty years, a daughter Tana, and another daughter, name unknown, who married one Leon Poggi.
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^ Dante is mentioned in a document dated 1283 as " the 62 DANTE IN FLORENCE died in oi* before 1278, was Alighiero's first wife, and Dante Avas their only child.
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It is uncertain whether he really married her, as widowers had social limitations in these matters. .This woman definitely bore two children, Dante's brother Francesco and sister Tana (Gaetana).^ Dantes father then married Lapa di Chiarissimo Cialuffi and they produced a son, Francesco, and a daughter, Gaetana.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante saw a scorpion rise from between the two wheels of the chariot, boring through its floor with its sting, then wrenching out a part of the floor and wandering about with it, as if with a trophy.

.When Dante was 12, he was promised in marriage to Gemma di Manetto Donati, daughter of Messer Manetto Donati.^ Ubertino Donati , the ancestor of Dantes wife Gemma, had married one of the daughters of Bellincion Berti , a sister of Gualdrada , and strongly objected to his father-in-law giving the hand of a third daughter to one of the Adimari.
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri - IndexAB. 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC poetryintranslation.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Dantes father then married Lapa di Chiarissimo Cialuffi and they produced a son, Francesco, and a daughter, Gaetana.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

^ About this time Dante married Gemma Donati, to whom he had been betrothed since 1277.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

Contracting marriages at this early age was quite common and involved a formal ceremony, including contracts signed before a notary. .Dante had already fallen in love with another woman, Beatrice Portinari (known also as Bice).^ In making the connection between Beatrice and Virgil, Dante is expressing his idea that courtly love is tied to reason rather than to passion.
  • The University of Edward Masen Chapter 18, a Twilight fanfic - FanFiction.Net 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.fanfiction.net [Source type: Original source]

^ His life was given direction by his spiritual love for Beatrice Portinari (d.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

^ At the age of 9, Dante met and fell in love with Beatrice.
  • Geometry.Net - Celebrities Books: Alighieri Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

Years after his marriage to Gemma, he met Beatrice again. .He had become interested in writing verse, and although he wrote several sonnets to Beatrice, he never mentioned his wife Gemma in any of his poems.^ Besides the De Monarchia Dante wrote in Latin prose a treatise on the vulgar tongue (De Fulgari Eloquenti(i), which is mentioned among his writings by both Villani and Boccaccio.
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^ Over the years, Dante's almost supernatural love only increased in intensity, and he poured out his feelings (grief, adoration, fear) into several poems and sonnets.
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Dante on the Italian €2.00 coin based on a portrait by Raphael
.Dante fought in the front rank of the Guelph cavalry at the battle of Campaldino (June 11, 1289).^ Dante is in the battle of Campaldino, where the Florentines defeat the people of Arezzo, June 11.
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^ Dante's military experiences did not end, as probably they did not begin, with the battle of Campaldino.
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^ Among the Florentine horsemen, according to the account of Leonardo Bruni,^ was Dante, ^'who fought vigorously on horseback in the front rank, where he was exposed to very grave danger ; for the first shock of battle was between the opposing troops of horse, in which the Aretine cavaliy charged the Florentine horsemen with 1 Villani, bk.
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.This victory brought forth a reformation of the Florentine constitution.^ "But the sin of ingratitude, with the help of the enemy of the human race, out of this prosperity brought forth pride and corruption, whereby the feasting and rejoicings of the Florentines were brought to an end.
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.To take any part in public life, one had to be enrolled in one of "the arts". So Dante entered the guild of physicians and apothecaries.^ In 1295 or 1296^ whether before or after his marriage we have no means of ascertaining, Dante, in order to qualify himself for the higher offices in the government of Florence, enrolled himself in the Guild of Physicians and Apothecaries, he having now reached the age at which, by the Florentine law, he was entitled to exercise the full rights of citizenship.
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^ And not satisfied with having plundered the houses of the proscribed, the most powerful partisans of the opposite faction occupied their possessions, — some taking one and some another, — and thus Dante's house was occupied.
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^ In that part, whence our life is nourish’d first, One he transpierc’d; then down before him fell Stretch’d out.
  • The Divine Comedy: Hell / by Dante Alighieri; translated by H. F. Cary; illustrated by Gustave Doré 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

.In following years, his name is frequently found recorded as speaking or voting in the various councils of the republic.^ He recorded his vote on various matters several times in one or other of the Councils during the month of September, the last of which mention is preserved being on September 28.
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^ He was of the order of the " Frati Godenti," of which an account may be seen in the Notes to Hell, Canto XXIII. In the year 1293, he founded a monastery of the order of Camaldoli, in Florence, and died in the following year.
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

.Dante had several children with Gemma.^ This Messer Pietro had a son called Dante, and to this Dante was born a son Leonardo, who is still living and has several children.
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^ "It should be known," he says, "that Dante had a sister, who was married to one of our citizens, called Leon Poggi, by whom she had several children.
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.As often happens with significant figures, many people subsequently claimed to be Dante's offspring; however, it is likely that Jacopo, Pietro, Giovanni and Antonia were truly his children.^ The ferry is a low punt-like boat that can hold many more people than it seems it should be able to.

^ At Ravenna, his last refuge, where his sons Pietro and Jacopo and his daughter Beatrice resided with him, Dante appears to have lived in ^ Ephtola ix.
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^ Like Shakespeare, Dante created universal types from historical figures, and in so doing he considerably enhanced the treasury of modern myth.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

Antonia became a nun with the name of Sister Beatrice.

Education and poetry

.Not much is known about Dante's education, and it is presumed he studied at home.^ And I showed him the house of Dante and of his ancestors, and gave him information about many things of which he was ignorant, owing to the fact that he and his family had been estranged from the home of their fathers."
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^ Virgil is a poet whom Dante had studied carefully and from whom he had acquired his poetic style, the beauty of which has brought him much honour.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Early life and the Vita nuova Most of what is known about Dantes life he has told himself.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

It is known that he studied Tuscan poetry, at a time when the Sicilian School (Scuola poetica siciliana), a cultural group from Sicily, was becoming known in Tuscany. .His interests brought him to discover the Occitan poetry of the troubadours and the Latin poetry of classical antiquity (with a particular devotion to Virgil).^ Virgil is a poet whom Dante had studied carefully and from whom he had acquired his poetic style, the beauty of which has brought him much honour.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

.During the "Secoli Bui" (Dark Ages), Italy had become a mosaic of small states, Sicily being the largest one, at the time under Angevin rule, and as far (culturally and politically) from Tuscany as Occitania was: the regions did not share a language, culture or easy communications.^ One’s neighbor is then not only a human being with his or her own rights and a fundamental equality with everyone else, but becomes the living image of God the Father, redeemed by the blood of Jesus Christ and placed under the permanent action of the Holy Spirit.
  • The Other Journal at Mars Hill Graduate School :: Facing Suffering: Human Rights Tragedies and the Divine Comedy by Kelly Johnson 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.theotherjournal.com [Source type: Original source]

^ He recorded his vote on various matters several times in one or other of the Councils during the month of September, the last of which mention is preserved being on September 28.
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^ Dante at this time was eighteen, and, both his father 73 74 DANTE IN FLORENCE and mother being dead^ according to Florentine usage was of age.
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Nevertheless, we can assume that Dante was a keen up-to-date intellectual with international interests.
Statue of Dante at the Uffizi, Florence
.When he was nine years old he met Beatrice Portinari, daughter of Folco Portinari, with whom he fell in love "at first sight", and apparently without even having spoken to her.^ At the age of 9, Dante met and fell in love with Beatrice.
  • Geometry.Net - Celebrities Books: Alighieri Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

^ Our Poet first sees Beatrice, daughter of Folco Portinari.
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^ His life was given direction by his spiritual love for Beatrice Portinari (d.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

.He saw her frequently after age 18, often exchanging greetings in the street, but he never knew her well; he effectively set the example for the so-called "courtly love". It is hard now to understand what this love actually consisted of, but something extremely important was happening within Italian culture.^ The age of Dante : a concise history of Italian culture in the years of the early Renaissance [Syracuse, N.Y.] : Syracuse University Press, [1957] .
  • University of Colorado at Boulder /All Locations 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC libraries.colorado.edu [Source type: Academic]

^ Now the down Of softness is exchang'd for plumes of age.
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  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Each Already by their names I knew, so well When they were chosen, I observ’d, and mark’d How one the other call’d.
  • The Divine Comedy: Hell / by Dante Alighieri; translated by H. F. Cary; illustrated by Gustave Doré 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

.It was in the name of this love that Dante gave his imprint to the "Dolce Stil Novo" (Sweet New Style) and would lead poets and writers to discover the themes of Love (Amore), which had never been so emphasized before.^ Their style lacked the spontaneity and sweetness of the dolce stil nuovo developed by Guido Guinicelli of Bologna, Guido Cavalcanti and Dante.
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri - IndexAB. 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC poetryintranslation.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Sweet, sprightly, insipid music plays, its volume never changing - nature themes, melodramatic sweetness, singing violins and the like - never funeral dirges or sombre tones.

^ Straight and tall she rose, and soft swift speech, and eyes of love, she gave, and in her face the warm blood beat, even as desire would have it.

.Love for Beatrice (as in a different manner Petrarch would show for his Laura) would apparently be the reason for poetry and for living, together with political passions.^ In making the connection between Beatrice and Virgil, Dante is expressing his idea that courtly love is tied to reason rather than to passion.
  • The University of Edward Masen Chapter 18, a Twilight fanfic - FanFiction.Net 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.fanfiction.net [Source type: Original source]

^ If Dante’s great passion were to overtake his reason, he would ruin them both.
  • The University of Edward Masen Chapter 18, a Twilight fanfic - FanFiction.Net 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.fanfiction.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Virgil obviously represents the love and practice of poetry, as opposed to the snares of political ambition.
  • S.FW - The Inferno 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.sfw.org [Source type: Original source]

.In many of his poems, she is depicted as semi-divine, watching over him constantly.^ His Purgatorio is written on the same plan, and presents what to many is the most attractive part of the Divine Comedy in the form of a readable English poem.
  • S.FW - The Purgatorio 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.sfw.org [Source type: Original source]

.When Beatrice died in 1290, Dante tried to find a refuge in Latin literature.^ His guide through Hell and Purgatory is the Latin poet Virgil , author of The Aeneid , and the guide through Paradise is Beatrice Portinari, Dante's ideal of a perfect woman.
  • Divine Comedy - Monstropedia - the largest encyclopedia about monsters 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.monstropedia.org [Source type: General]

^ Following Sophie's advice from before, Lok tries to find the local private eye, Dante.
  • Huntik : The Divine Comedy Video Episode - 4KidsTV.com 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.4kidstv.com [Source type: Original source]

^ And though Beatrice died, because of Dante's love for her and her placement in the "Comedia," she has achieved a kind of immortality.
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.The Convivio reveals that he had read Boethius's De consolatione philosophiae and Cicero's De amicitia.^ Boetius, whose book De Consolatione Philosophiae excited so much attention during the middle ages, was born, as Tiraboschi conjectures, about 470.
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

.He then dedicated himself to philosophical studies at religious schools like the Dominican one in Santa Maria Novella.^ "Like I haven't heard that one before, straight from Lucifer himself.
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.He took part in the disputes that the two principal mendicant orders (Franciscan and Dominican) publicly or indirectly held in Florence, the former explaining the doctrine of the mystics and of Saint Bonaventure, the latter presenting Saint Thomas Aquinas' theories.^ Dante is then met by St. Bonaventure, a Franciscan who recounts the life of St. Dominic, and laments the corruption of the Franciscan Order.
  • Divine Comedy - Monstropedia - the largest encyclopedia about monsters 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.monstropedia.org [Source type: General]

^ But Thomas Aquinas, who was very good at making distinctions, noticed that there are two distinct kinds of joy.
  • The Other Journal at Mars Hill Graduate School :: Facing Suffering: Human Rights Tragedies and the Divine Comedy by Kelly Johnson 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.theotherjournal.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Albertus Magnus was born at Laugingen, in Thuringia, in 1193, and studied at Paris and at Padua, at the latter of which places he entered into the Dominican order.
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.At 18, Dante met Guido Cavalcanti, Lapo Gianni, Cino da Pistoia and soon after Brunetto Latini; together they became the leaders of the Dolce Stil Novo.^ Among the leaders of the Whites was the poet, Guido Cavalcanti, Dante's earliest friend.
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^ Their style lacked the spontaneity and sweetness of the dolce stil nuovo developed by Guido Guinicelli of Bologna, Guido Cavalcanti and Dante.
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri - IndexAB. 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC poetryintranslation.com [Source type: Original source]

^ For which purpose, though it was still far in the night, they set off together, and went to the house in which Dante resided at the time of his death.
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.Brunetto later received a special mention in the Divine Comedy (Inferno, XV, 28), for what he had taught Dante.^ A master's works Okay, everyone has heard of the "Divine Comedy," the medieval masterwork of legendary poet Dante Alighieri.
  • Geometry.Net - Celebrities Books: Alighieri Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

^ INFERNO 11 THE DIVINE COMEDY −− INFERNO nbsp; nbsp; Let us not speak of them, but look, and pass."
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^ I could not hear what he proposed to them; INFERNO 31 THE DIVINE COMEDY −− INFERNO nbsp; nbsp; But with them there he did not linger long, nbsp; nbsp; Ere each within in rivalry ran back.
  • Divine Comedy Inferno The Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

.Nor speaking less on that account, I go With Ser Brunetto, and I ask who are His most known and most eminent companions.^ But for all that, I did not cease from speaking To Ser Brunetto, and I asked who were His most noble and renowned companions.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Nor speaking less on that account, I go nbsp; nbsp; With Ser Brunetto, and I ask who are nbsp; nbsp; His most known and most eminent companions.
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^ 'Let all hope In thee,' so speak his anthem, 'who have known Thy name;' and with my faith who know not that?
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]
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.Some fifty poetical components by Dante are known (the so-called Rime, rhymes), others being included in the later Vita Nuova and Convivio.^ Dante writes his Vita Nuova.
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Several years after the composition of the Vita Nuova," says Boccaccio, " Dante, as he looked down from the high places of the government of * i.e.
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^ Because of this intellectual indebtedness, Dante dedicated his Vita nuova to Cavalcantito his best friend (primo amico).
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

.Other studies are reported, or deduced from Vita Nuova or the Comedy, regarding painting and music.^ While "La Vita Nuova" doesn't describe much beyond art and love, "Divine Comedy" also tackles religion and politics.
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^ "La Vita Nuova" (The New Life) is only loosely connected with the "Comedy."
  • Geometry.Net - Celebrities Books: Alighieri Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

^ Read more Customer Reviews (2) A mythic love The 'Vita Nuova' is more than anything else a prelude to 'The Divine Comedy'.
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Florence and politics

.Dante, like most Florentines of his day, was embroiled in the Guelph-Ghibelline conflict.^ Dante discourses with a pair of Florentines in one of the tombs: Farinata degli Uberti, a Ghibelline; and Cavalcante de' Cavalcanti, a Guelph who was the father of Dante's friend, fellow poet Guido Cavalcanti.
  • Divine Comedy - Monstropedia - the largest encyclopedia about monsters 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.monstropedia.org [Source type: General]

^ Bocca, though a Ghibelline, fought on the Guelph side at Montaperti in 1260 when the Florentine Guelphs went down to defeat.
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri - IndexAB. 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC poetryintranslation.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Dantes life was shaped by the long history of conflict between the imperial and papal partisans called, respectively, Ghibellines and Guelfs.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

.He fought in the battle of Campaldino (June 11, 1289), with the Florentine Guelphs against Arezzo Ghibellines, then in 1294 he was among the escorts of Charles Martel of Anjou (grandson of Charles I of Naples more commonly called Charles of Anjou) while he was in Florence.^ Dante is in the battle of Campaldino, where the Florentines defeat the people of Arezzo, June 11.
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^ Guelph and Ghibelline parties in Florence."
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^ Six years later^ we are told, he took part in the war which had broken out in 1287 between Florence and Arezzo, and was present, fighting on the side of the Florentine Guelfs, at their great victory over the Aretines at Campaldino on June 11, 1289.
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To further his political career, he became a pharmacist. .He did not intend to actually practice as one, but a law issued in 1295 required that nobles who wanted public office had to be enrolled in one of the Corporazioni delle Arti e dei Mestieri, so Dante obtained admission to the apothecaries' guild.^ In 1295 or 1296^ whether before or after his marriage we have no means of ascertaining, Dante, in order to qualify himself for the higher offices in the government of Florence, enrolled himself in the Guild of Physicians and Apothecaries, he having now reached the age at which, by the Florentine law, he was entitled to exercise the full rights of citizenship.
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^ But for all that, I did not cease from speaking To Ser Brunetto, and I asked who were His most noble and renowned companions.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Bonaventura's life in me behold, From Bagnororegio, one, who in discharge Of my great offices still laid aside All sinister aim.
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This profession was not entirely inapt, since at that time books were sold from apothecaries' shops. .As a politician, he accomplished little, but he held various offices over a number of years in a city undergoing political unrest.^ DANTE IN FLORENCE step in his political career, which was destined within a few years to lead him into lifelong exile from his native city.
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^ Pablo has been held captive by the FARC in Colombia for 12 years, a victim of political gamesmanship and President Uribe's propaganda machine.
  • The Rag Blog: Divine Comedy : Joe Lieberman and the Hypocrites 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC theragblog.blogspot.com [Source type: News]

Dante Alighieri, detail from a Luca Signorelli's affresco della cappella di San Brizio, Duomo, Orvieto
.After defeating the Ghibellines, the Guelphs divided into two factions: the White Guelphs (Guelfi Bianchi) -- Dante's party, led by Vieri dei Cerchi -- and the Black Guelphs (Guelfi Neri), led by Corso Donati.^ The city of Florence, divided into the Bianchi and Neri factions.
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante - Full Text Free Book (Part 3/11) 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
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^ The ruling Guelf class of Florence became divided into a party of Blacks, led by Corso Donati, and a party of Whites, to which Dante belonged.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Guelph and Ghibelline parties in Florence."
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.Although initially the split was along family lines, ideological differences rose based on opposing views of the papal role in Florentine affairs, with the Blacks supporting the Pope and the Whites wanting more freedom from Rome.^ CANTO XXXI In fashion, as a snow-white rose, lay then Before my view the saintly multitude, Which in his own blood Christ espous'd.
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^ Though still under the papal interdict for the murder of Abbot Tesauro of Vallombrosa, the Florentine Guelphs were nevertheless the allies of the Pope against King Manfred.
  • Holloway: Chancery and Comedy: Brunetto Latini and Dante Alighieri 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.brown.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Sid takes a contrarian view, opposing those who would blame Haiti's pre-earthquake state of affairs on the United States and other external powers.
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Initially the Whites were in power and expelled the Blacks. .In response, Pope Boniface VIII planned a military occupation of Florence.^ Pope Boniface VIII. dies.
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^ Charles of Valois, brother of Philip IV, was sent by Pope Boniface VIII to settle the disturbed state of Florence.
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^ His deception by Pope Boniface VIII. XXVIII. The Ninth Bolgia: Schismatics.
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.In 1301, Charles de Valois, brother of Philip the Fair king of France, was expected to visit Florence because the Pope had appointed him peacemaker for Tuscany.^ Charles Martel, king of Hungary, visits Florence, Par.
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^ Montfort, Guy de ; King Charles' vicar in Florence, 57-8.
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^ He a new Jason shall be call’d, of whom In Maccabees we read; and favour such As to that priest his king indulgent show’d, Shall be of France’s monarch shown to him.” .
  • The Divine Comedy: Hell / by Dante Alighieri; translated by H. F. Cary; illustrated by Gustave Doré 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]

.But the city's government had treated the Pope's ambassadors badly a few weeks before, seeking independence from papal influence.^ In March, 1266, Ghibelline ambassadors from Florence to the Curia, among them Buonaccorso Elisei, Dante's blood relative, outlined to the Pope a restoration of the former Florentine government.
  • Holloway: Chancery and Comedy: Brunetto Latini and Dante Alighieri 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.brown.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.It was believed that Charles de Valois would eventually have received other unofficial instructions.^ The Whites^ on tlie other hand^ to which faction Dante himself belonged, were bitterly opposed both to Boniface and to Charles of Valois.
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.So the council sent a delegation to Rome to ascertain the Pope's intentions.^ In order to ascertain the nature of the Popes intentions, an embassy was sent to Rome to discuss these matters with him.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

Dante was one of the delegates.

Exile and death

.Boniface quickly dismissed the other delegates and asked Dante alone to remain in Rome.^ After more than a year of this maneuvering, the commune sent Dante and two others to have words with Boniface in Rome in 1301.
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^ The Whites^ on tlie other hand^ to which faction Dante himself belonged, were bitterly opposed both to Boniface and to Charles of Valois.
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^ The Pope dismissed the other two legates and detained Dante.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

.At the same time (November 1, 1301), Charles de Valois entered Florence with Black Guelphs, who in the next six days destroyed much of the city and killed many of their enemies.^ In early November 1301 the forces of Charles of Valois were permitted entry to Florence.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

^ All those, who in that time were there from Mars Until the Baptist, fit to carry arms, Were but the fifth of them this day alive.
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^ Prevail'd on thee to break the plighted bond Many, who now are weeping, would rejoice, Had God to Ema giv'n thee, the first time Thou near our city cam'st.
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.A new Black Guelph government was installed and Messer Cante de' Gabrielli da Gubbio was appointed Podestà of Florence.^ With the news of Benevento, Ghibelline Florence played safe and elected two podestà , two Jovial Friars, one Guelph and one Ghibelline, from Bologna.
  • Holloway: Chancery and Comedy: Brunetto Latini and Dante Alighieri 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.brown.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Dante was condemned to exile for two years, and ordered to pay a large fine.^ Thereupon the Doge at once ordered Dante to be served with a fine large fish."
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^ Two hundred and sixty years later (in 1782) the tomb was once more restored, and, at the inauguration by Cardinal Valentino Gonzaga, it was opened for the purpose of verifying the I40 DANTE IN EXILE remains.
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^ He had died in exile in Lucca in the parish of San Frediano two years after Montaperti.
  • Holloway: Chancery and Comedy: Brunetto Latini and Dante Alighieri 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.brown.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The poet was still in Rome, where the Pope had "suggested" he stay, and was therefore considered an absconder.^ The Pope “invited” Dante to stay in Rome while his companions returned to Florence to try to bring the commune around.
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.He did not pay the fine, in part because he believed he was not guilty, and in part because all his assets in Florence had been seized by the Black Guelphs.^ In the meantime, the Pope’s key man had got himself into Florence and helped the Blacks take power, whereupon they confiscated properties and levied fines.
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.He was condemned to perpetual exile, and if he returned to Florence without paying the fine, he could be burned at the stake.^ When that did not happen, either (Dante was apparently in Siena , a short ways from Florence, when he heard this news), the commune confiscated all of his goods and condemned him to death by burning should he ever return.
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^ He died, either in exile at Serrazana, or soon after his return to Florence, December 1300, during the spring of which year the action of this poem is supposed to be passing.
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante - Full Text Free Book (Part 3/11) 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
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^ The leading figure in Florences intellectual ascendancy was a returning exile, Brunetto Latini.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

(The city council of Florence finally passed a motion rescinding Dante's sentence in June 2008.[3])
A recreated death mask of Dante Alighieri (in Palazzo Vecchio, Florence)
He took part in several attempts by the White Guelphs to regain power, but these failed due to treachery. Dante, bitter at the treatment he received from his enemies, also grew disgusted with the infighting and ineffectiveness of his erstwhile allies, and vowed to become a party of one. .At this point, he began sketching the foundation for the Divine Comedy, a work in 100 cantos, divided into three books of thirty-three cantos each, with a single introductory canto.^ Dante's greatest work, an epic poem in one hundred cantos, is divided equally after an introductory canto into sections, each thirty-three cantos in length, which see Dante and a guide respectively through Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

^ A master's works Okay, everyone has heard of the "Divine Comedy," the medieval masterwork of legendary poet Dante Alighieri.
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^ Divine Comedy So a demon, an angel, and a muse walk into a bar.
  • Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC shetiger.com [Source type: Original source]

.Dante went to Verona as a guest of Bartolomeo I della Scala, then moved to Sarzana in Liguria.^ Alberto della Scala, lord of Verona, who had made his natural son abbot of San Zeno.
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^ He said then, that Dante belonged to the party of Messer Vieri de' Cerchi, and was one of its great leaders ; and when Messer Vieri and many of his followers left Florence, Dante left that city also and went to Verona.
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^ Scala, Bartolommeodella; Dante's host at Verona, 118.
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.Later, he is supposed to have lived in Lucca with Madame Gentucca, who made his stay comfortable (and was later gratefully mentioned in Purgatorio, XXIV, 37).^ Guido Guinicelli in that made by Corbinelli, (p 169,) from which we collect that he lived not about 1230, as Quadrio supposes, (t.
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.Some speculative sources say that he was also in Paris between 1308 and 1310. Other sources, even less trustworthy, take him to Oxford.^ And the division spread even between own brothers, one holding with one faction, and one with the other.
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^ The absurd imputation of his having dealt in the magical art is well known; and his biographers take some pains to clear him of it.
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^ So that, if it shall please Him through whom all things live, that my life be prolonged for some years, I hope to say of her what was never said of any woman."
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.In 1310, the Holy Roman Emperor Henry VII of Luxembourg, marched 5,000 troops into Italy.^ Some hold that Dante wrote it before his exile from Florence ; but it was most pi-obably written, as Boccaccio says it was, about the time when the Emperor Henry vii.
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^ Albrecht I of Hapsburg, King of the Germans, and Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire (1298-1308), the son of the Emperor Rudolph (1273-91).
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri - IndexAB. 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC poetryintranslation.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Within a short time after his arrival in Italy in 1310 Henry VIIs great appeal began to fade.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

.Dante saw in him a new Charlemagne who would restore the office of the Holy Roman Emperor to its former glory and also re-take Florence from the Black Guelphs.^ DANTE IN FLORENCE retaliated by killing him.
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^ When some of these I recogniz'd, I saw And knew the shade of him, who to base fear Yielding, abjur'd his high estate.
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^ The driver not knowing who Dante was, nor why he had struck him, only beat his donkeys the more, and again cried out : Arri !
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He wrote to Henry and several Italian princes, demanding that they destroy the Black Guelphs. Mixing religion and private concerns, he invoked the worst anger of God against his city, suggesting several particular targets that coincided with his personal enemies. .It was during this time that he wrote De Monarchia, proposing a universal monarchy under Henry VII, and the first two books of the Divine Comedy.^ Some hold that Dante wrote it before his exile from Florence ; but it was most pi-obably written, as Boccaccio says it was, about the time when the Emperor Henry vii.
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^ I could not hear what he proposed to them; INFERNO 31 THE DIVINE COMEDY −− INFERNO nbsp; nbsp; But with them there he did not linger long, nbsp; nbsp; Ere each within in rivalry ran back.
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^ Besides the De Monarchia Dante wrote in Latin prose a treatise on the vulgar tongue (De Fulgari Eloquenti(i), which is mentioned among his writings by both Villani and Boccaccio.
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Statue of Dante in the Piazza di Santa Croce in Florence
.In Florence, Baldo d'Aguglione pardoned most of the White Guelphs in exile and allowed them to return; however, Dante had gone too far in his violent letters to Arrigo (Henry VII), and he was not recalled.^ Some hold that Dante wrote it before his exile from Florence ; but it was most pi-obably written, as Boccaccio says it was, about the time when the Emperor Henry vii.
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^ DANTE IN FLORENCE ^'What violence, or what chance, carried thee so far astray from Campaldino, that thy burial-place was never known ?
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^ The leading figure in Florences intellectual ascendancy was a returning exile, Brunetto Latini.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

.In 1312, Henry assaulted Florence and defeated the Black Guelphs, but there is no evidence that Dante was involved.^ Some hold that Dante wrote it before his exile from Florence ; but it was most pi-obably written, as Boccaccio says it was, about the time when the Emperor Henry vii.
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^ There is no passage in which Dante's opinion of the evil; that had arisen from the mixture of the civil with the ecclesiastical power, is more unequivocally declared.
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^ "On the Emperor Henry's death," writes Bruni, " every hope of Dante's was utterly destroyed ; for he had himself closed up the way to forgiveness by his abusive writings against the government of the commonwealth ; and there was no longer any hope of return by force."
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.Some say he refused to participate in the assault on his city by a foreigner; others suggest that he had become unpopular with the White Guelphs too and that any trace of his passage had carefully been removed.^ In speaking of the nightingale, let me observe, that while some have considered its song as a melancholy, and others as a cheerful one, Chiabrera appears to have come nearest the truth, when he says, in the Alcippo, a.
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^ The said Dante," he says, "was one of the chief magistrates of our city, and was of the White party, and a Guelf withal ; and on that account, without any other fault, with the said White party he was driven out and banished from Florence."
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.In 1313, Henry VII died, and with him any hope for Dante to see Florence again.^ DANTE IN FLORENCE retaliated by killing him.
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^ The Emperor Henry VII, who died in 1313.
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  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

^ The Emperor Henry of Luxemburg, by whom he had hoped to be restored to Florence, dies.
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  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

.He returned to Verona, where Cangrande I della Scala allowed him to live in a certain security and, presumably, in a fair amount of prosperity.^ He seeks an asylum at Verona, under the roof of the Signori della Scala.
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  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Alberto della Scala, lord of Verona, who had made his natural son abbot of San Zeno.
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^ Verona, the country of Can della Scala, is situated between Feltro, a city in the Marca Trivigiana, and Monte Feltro, a city in the territory of Urbino.
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Cangrande was admitted to Dante's Paradise (Paradiso, XVII, 76).
.In 1315, Florence was forced by Uguccione della Faggiuola (the military officer controlling the town) to grant an amnesty to people in exile, including Dante.^ So, too, Dante sings of the just son of a city, Florence, who was unjustly expelled, and forced to search, as Aeneas had done, for a better city, in his case the heavenly city.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

^ His political manoeuvres are the background to the critical three years of Dantes political life, leading to his exile from Florence, and described in Ciaccos prophecy .
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri - IndexAB. 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC poetryintranslation.com [Source type: Original source]

.But Florence required that as well as paying a sum of money, these exiles would do public penance.^ But if well they knew, These dames of Florence, what the heavens prepare, The sheaf which now is bound to scourge them, there Wide would they open mouths to howl their woe.
  • S.FW - The Purgatorio 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.sfw.org [Source type: Original source]

.Dante refused, preferring to remain in exile.^ Boccaccio, in a chapter of his Life of Dante, headed, "A Rebuke to the Florentines," reproaches them with their treatment of Dante, and urges them at least to recall his dead body from exile, adding, however, that he feels sure their request for his remains would be refused.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The petition for Dante's remains was refused by the Polenta family, the then lords of Ravenna ; and a second request, preferred on similar grounds some thirty years later (1429), was likewise refused.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

.When Uguccione defeated Florence, Dante's death sentence was commuted to house arrest, on condition that he go to Florence to swear that he would never enter the town again.^ Full well can the wise poet of Florence That hight Dante, speaken in this sentence Lo!
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^ For which purpose, though it was still far in the night, they set off together, and went to the house in which Dante resided at the time of his death.
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^ Dante's father can hardly have been a person of much consequence in Florence ; otherwise, as a Guelf, he would have shared the exile of his party after the disastrous defeat of the Florentine Guelfs at Montaperti (Sept.
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Dante refused to go. His death sentence was confirmed and extended to his sons. .Dante still hoped late in life that he might be invited back to Florence on honorable terms.^ Italy, — the Emperor through whose means Dante hoped to be restored to Florence.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

^ When I hold you in my arms And look back on my charmed life, my charmed life, I hope, baby I hope if nothing more That one day you’ll call your life a charmed life.

^ Leo granted the request of the Academicians, and forthwith a mission was despatched to Ravenna to bring back Dante's bones to Florence.
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.For Dante, exile was nearly a form of death, stripping him of much of his identity.^ Dante's father can hardly have been a person of much consequence in Florence ; otherwise, as a Guelf, he would have shared the exile of his party after the disastrous defeat of the Florentine Guelfs at Montaperti (Sept.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

^ To which Dante replied : ' As I knew that the father of this fish met his death in these waters, I was asking him news of his father.'
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^ Dante was fifty-six years old at the time of his death, when the mask was taken ; the portrait by Giotto represents him as not much past twenty.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

He addresses the pain of exile in Paradiso, XVII (55-60), where Cacciaguida, his great-great-grandfather, warns him what to expect:
.
Mural of Dante in the Uffizi Gallery, by Andrea del Castagno, c.
^ Dante Alighieri Andrea del Castagno Mural of Dante in the Uffizi Gallery c.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

1450
... Tu lascerai ogne cosa diletta ... You shall leave everything you love most:
più caramente; e questo è quello strale this is the arrow that the bow of exile
che l'arco de lo essilio pria saetta. shoots first. You are to know the bitter taste
Tu proverai sì come sa di sale of others' bread, how salty it is, and know
lo pane altrui, e come è duro calle how hard a path it is for one who goes
lo scendere e 'l salir per l'altrui scale ... ascending and descending others' stairs ...
As for the hope of returning to Florence, he describes it as if he had already accepted its impossibility, (Paradiso, XXV, 1–9):
Se mai continga che 'l poema sacro If it ever come to pass that the sacred poem
al quale ha posto mano e cielo e terra, to which both heaven and earth have set their hand
sì che m'ha fatto per molti anni macro, so as to have made me lean for many years
vinca la crudeltà che fuor mi serra should overcome the cruelty that bars me
del bello ovile ov'io dormi' agnello, from the fair sheepfold where I slept as a lamb,
nimico ai lupi che li danno guerra; an enemy to the wolves that make war on it,
con altra voce omai, con altro vello with another voice now and other fleece
ritornerò poeta, e in sul fonte I shall return a poet and at the font
del mio battesmo prenderò 'l cappello ... of my baptism take the laurel crown ...
.Prince Guido Novello da Polenta invited him to Ravenna in 1318, and he accepted.^ He takes refuge at Ravenna with Guido Novello da Polenta.
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^ Guido Novello of Polenta obtains the sovereignty of Ravenna.
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  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Guido was the son of Ostasio da Polenta, and made himself master of Ravenna, in 1265.
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  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

.He finished the Paradiso, and died in 1321 (at the age of 56) while returning to Ravenna from a diplomatic mission to Venice, possibly of malaria contracted there.^ In the summer of 1321, a difference having arisen between Ravenna and Venice, on account ^ PaiadisOf xxv, l-j.
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^ The con- sequences to Dante were fatal, for he contracted a fever (as is supposed) on the way, and, growing worse after his return to Ravenna, died in that city on September 14, 1321, aged fifty-six years and four months.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

.Dante was buried in Ravenna at the Church of San Pier Maggiore (later called San Francesco).^ Dante called the poem "Comedy" (the adjective "Divine" added later in the 16th century) because poems in the ancient world were classified as High ("Tragedy") or Low ("Comedy").
  • Geometry.Net - Celebrities Books: Alighieri Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

.Bernardo Bembo, praetor of Venice in 1483, took care of his remains by building a better tomb.^ It was restored in 1483 by Bernardo Bembo, who was at that time Praetor of the Venetian Republic in Ravenna.
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^ Bembo, Bernardo; restores Dante's tomb, 132, 139 ; undertakes to restore Dante's remains to Florence, 138.
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On the grave, some verses of Bernardo Canaccio, a friend of Dante, dedicated to Florence:
parvi Florentia mater amoris
"Florence, mother of little love"
.Eventually, Florence came to regret Dante's exile, and made repeated requests for the return of his remains.^ Some hold that Dante wrote it before his exile from Florence ; but it was most pi-obably written, as Boccaccio says it was, about the time when the Emperor Henry vii.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante's father can hardly have been a person of much consequence in Florence ; otherwise, as a Guelf, he would have shared the exile of his party after the disastrous defeat of the Florentine Guelfs at Montaperti (Sept.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Boccaccio, in a chapter of his Life of Dante, headed, "A Rebuke to the Florentines," reproaches them with their treatment of Dante, and urges them at least to recall his dead body from exile, adding, however, that he feels sure their request for his remains would be refused.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

The custodians of the body at Ravenna refused to comply, at one point going so far as to conceal the bones in a false wall of the monastery. Nevertheless, in 1829, a tomb was built for him in Florence in the basilica of Santa Croce. .That tomb has been empty ever since, with Dante's body remaining in Ravenna, far from the land he loved so dearly.^ Dante's tomb at Ravenna .
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^ Incorporating poems and prose, and distinguished by Dante’s remarkable linguistic style, New Life remains one of the greatest works in the literature of love.
  • Geometry.Net - Celebrities Books: Alighieri Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

^ The tomb of Dante is empty ; the bones are no longer there.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

.The front of his tomb in Florence reads Onorate l'altissimo poeta - which roughly translates as "Honour the most exalted poet". The phrase is a quote from the fourth canto of the Inferno, depicting Virgil's welcome as he returns among the great ancient poets spending eternity in Limbo.^ Onorate l'altissimo poeta.
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante - Full Text Free Book (Part 3/11) 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
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  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Virgil, Dante's master, the great Roman poet who guides him through Hell and Purgatory.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

^ On its most personal level, it draws on the poets own experience of exile from his native city of Florence; on its most comprehensive level, it may be read as an allegory, taking the form of a journey through hell, purgatory, and paradise.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

The continuation of the line, L'ombra sua torna, ch'era dipartita ("his spirit, which had left us, returns"), is poignantly absent from the empty tomb.
In 2007, a reconstruction of Dante's face was completed in a collaborative project. .Artists from Pisa University and engineers at the University of Bologna at Forli completed the revealing model, which indicated that Dante's features were somewhat different than was once thought.^ Dante studies at the universities of Bologna and Padua.
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  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Likewise Dante thought no little of himself, rating his own worth no less highly, accoi'ding to the reports of his contemporaries, than was his actual due.
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^ Some of his biographers state that Dante during his early manhood studied at the universities of Bologna and Padua, but there is no evidence to support this statement, which is probably little more than a conjecture.
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[4][5]

Works

Dante, poised between the mountain of purgatory and the city of Florence, displays the famous incipit Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita in a detail of Domenico di Michelino's painting, Florence 1465.
See also Category:Works by Dante Alighieri.
.The Divine Comedy describes Dante's journey through Hell (Inferno), Purgatory (Purgatorio), and Paradise (Paradiso), guided first by the Roman poet Virgil and then by Beatrice, the subject of his love and of another of his works, La Vita Nuova.^ It is an allegory of universal human destiny in the form of a pilgrims journey through hell and purgatory, guided by the Roman poet Virgil, and then to Paradise, guided by Beatrice.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

^ As he was bemoaning his fate, the poet Virgil approached Dante and offered to conduct him through Hell, Purgatory, and blissful Paradise.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Virgil, Dante's master, the great Roman poet who guides him through Hell and Purgatory.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

.While the vision of Hell, the Inferno, is vivid for modern readers, the theological niceties presented in the other books require a certain amount of patience and knowledge to appreciate.^ While the vision of Hell, the Inferno, is vivid for modern readers, the theological niceties presented in the other books require a certain amount of patience and scholarship to understand.Purgatorio, the most lyrical and human of the three, also has the most poets in it; Paradiso, the most heavily theological, has the most beautiful and ecstatic mystic passages in which Dante tries to describe what he confesses he is unable to convey (e.g., when Dante looks into the face of God: "all'alta fantasia qui mancò possa" - "at this high moment, ability failed my capacity to describe," Paradiso, XXXIII, 142).
  • Geometry.Net - Celebrities Books: Alighieri Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

^ Any modern-day reader can appreciate its poetic substance; the effort to understand Dante's world is rewarded by the richness of description, insight, and transcendence in this artful and epic masterpiece.
  • Geometry.Net - Celebrities Books: Alighieri Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

^ Now will I have thee know, the other time INFERNO 43 THE DIVINE COMEDY −− INFERNO nbsp; nbsp; I here descended to the nether Hell, nbsp; nbsp; This precipice had not yet fallen down.
  • Divine Comedy Inferno The Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

.Purgatorio, the most lyrical and human of the three, also has the most poets in it; Paradiso, the most heavily theological, has the most beautiful and ecstatic mystic passages in which Dante tries to describe what he confesses he is unable to convey (e.g., when Dante looks into the face of God: "all'alta fantasia qui mancò possa" - "at this high moment, ability failed my capacity to describe," Paradiso, XXXIII, 142).^ While the vision of Hell, the Inferno, is vivid for modern readers, the theological niceties presented in the other books require a certain amount of patience and scholarship to understand.Purgatorio, the most lyrical and human of the three, also has the most poets in it; Paradiso, the most heavily theological, has the most beautiful and ecstatic mystic passages in which Dante tries to describe what he confesses he is unable to convey (e.g., when Dante looks into the face of God: "all'alta fantasia qui mancò possa" - "at this high moment, ability failed my capacity to describe," Paradiso, XXXIII, 142).
  • Geometry.Net - Celebrities Books: Alighieri Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

^ And it is Canticle II, the poet's ascent through Purgatory, which stirs so deeply the soul and inspires the very penitence and hope of purgation which Dante describes there.
  • Geometry.Net - Celebrities Books: Alighieri Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

^ Had my pen a longer course, Something I might relate, though failing all, Of that sweet draught which mine insatiate lips Could not have tired of tasting.
  • S.FW - The Purgatorio 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.sfw.org [Source type: Original source]

.Dante wrote the Comedy in a new language he called "Italian", based on the regional dialect of Tuscany, with some elements of Latin and of the other regional dialects.^ This masterpiece was written in Italian, but Dante also wrote in Latin, the language of scholarship at that time.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante wrote the Comedy in his regional dialect.By creating a poem of epic structure and philosophic purpose, he established that the Italian language was suitable for the highest sort of expression, and simultaneously established the Tuscan dialect as the standard for Italian.
  • Geometry.Net - Celebrities Books: Alighieri Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

^ Some hold that Dante wrote it before his exile from Florence ; but it was most pi-obably written, as Boccaccio says it was, about the time when the Emperor Henry vii.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

.By creating a poem of epic structure and philosophic purpose, he established that the Italian language was suitable for the highest sort of expression.^ Dante wrote the Comedy in his regional dialect.By creating a poem of epic structure and philosophic purpose, he established that the Italian language was suitable for the highest sort of expression, and simultaneously established the Tuscan dialect as the standard for Italian.
  • Geometry.Net - Celebrities Books: Alighieri Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

.In French, Italian is nicknamed la langue de Dante. Publishing in the vernacular language marked Dante as one of the first (among others such as Geoffrey Chaucer and Giovanni Boccaccio) to break from standards of publishing in only Latin (the languages of liturgy, history, and scholarship in general).^ His poems, which are in the French language, were edited by M. l'Eveque de la Ravalliere.
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

^ This masterpiece was written in Italian, but Dante also wrote in Latin, the language of scholarship at that time.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In French, Italian is nicknamed la langue de Dante.Publishing in the vernacular language marked Dante as one of the first (among others such as Geoffrey Chaucer and Giovanni Boccaccio) to break from standards of publishing in only Latin or Greek (the languages of Church and antiquity).This break allowed more literature to be published for a wider audience - setting the stage for greater levels of literacy in the future.
  • Geometry.Net - Celebrities Books: Alighieri Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

.This break allowed more literature to be published for a wider audience - setting the stage for greater levels of literacy in the future.^ In French, Italian is nicknamed la langue de Dante.Publishing in the vernacular language marked Dante as one of the first (among others such as Geoffrey Chaucer and Giovanni Boccaccio) to break from standards of publishing in only Latin or Greek (the languages of Church and antiquity).This break allowed more literature to be published for a wider audience - setting the stage for greater levels of literacy in the future.
  • Geometry.Net - Celebrities Books: Alighieri Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

^ But inform Me who thou art, that in a place so sad Art set, and in such torment, that although Other be greater, more disgustful none Can be imagin'd."
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

Profile portrait of Dante, by Sandro Botticelli (1444–1510)
.Readers often cannot understand how such a serious work may be called a "comedy". In Dante's time, all serious scholarly works were written in Latin (a tradition that would persist for several hundred years more, until the waning years of the Enlightenment) and works written in any other language were assumed to be more trivial in nature.^ Readers often cannot understand how such a serious work may be called a "comedy".In Dante's time, all serious scholarly works were written in Latin (a tradition that would persist for several hundred years more, until the waning years of the Enlightenment) and works written in any other language were assumed to be comedic in nature.Furthermore, the word "comedy," in the classical sense, refers to works which reflect belief in an ordered universe, in which events not only tended towards a happy or "amusing" ending, but an ending influenced by a Providential will that orders all things to an ultimate good.By this meaning of the word, the progression of Dante's pilgrim from Hell to Paradise is the paradigmatic expression of comedy, since the work begins with the pilgrim's moral confusion and ends with the vision of God.
  • Geometry.Net - Celebrities Books: Alighieri Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

^ This masterpiece was written in Italian, but Dante also wrote in Latin, the language of scholarship at that time.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

^ A hundred years twice told and more.
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  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

.Furthermore, the word "comedy," in the classical sense, refers to works which reflect belief in an ordered universe, in which events not only tended towards a happy or "amusing" ending, but an ending influenced by a Providential will that orders all things to an ultimate good.^ Readers often cannot understand how such a serious work may be called a "comedy".In Dante's time, all serious scholarly works were written in Latin (a tradition that would persist for several hundred years more, until the waning years of the Enlightenment) and works written in any other language were assumed to be comedic in nature.Furthermore, the word "comedy," in the classical sense, refers to works which reflect belief in an ordered universe, in which events not only tended towards a happy or "amusing" ending, but an ending influenced by a Providential will that orders all things to an ultimate good.By this meaning of the word, the progression of Dante's pilgrim from Hell to Paradise is the paradigmatic expression of comedy, since the work begins with the pilgrim's moral confusion and ends with the vision of God.
  • Geometry.Net - Celebrities Books: Alighieri Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

^ For one day you are here, and the next you are gone Every horse has its year and every dog its day, my son So the only thing to feel sad about is all the dogs and the horses you’ll have to outlive They’ll be with you when you say good-bye .

^ Evil as a privation can only feed off of goodness; if all the goodness of a creature was eliminated, the creature in question would no longer exist.” .
  • The University of Edward Masen Chapter 18, a Twilight fanfic - FanFiction.Net 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.fanfiction.net [Source type: Original source]

.By this meaning of the word, as Dante himself wrote in a letter to Cangrande I della Scala, the progression of the pilgrimage from Hell to Paradise is the paradigmatic expression of comedy, since the work begins with the pilgrim's moral confusion and ends with the vision of God.^ She appeals to Virgil to guide Dante through Hell because she is unable to travel there, owing to her permanent residence in Paradise.
  • The University of Edward Masen Chapter 18, a Twilight fanfic - FanFiction.Net 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.fanfiction.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Readers often cannot understand how such a serious work may be called a "comedy".In Dante's time, all serious scholarly works were written in Latin (a tradition that would persist for several hundred years more, until the waning years of the Enlightenment) and works written in any other language were assumed to be comedic in nature.Furthermore, the word "comedy," in the classical sense, refers to works which reflect belief in an ordered universe, in which events not only tended towards a happy or "amusing" ending, but an ending influenced by a Providential will that orders all things to an ultimate good.By this meaning of the word, the progression of Dante's pilgrim from Hell to Paradise is the paradigmatic expression of comedy, since the work begins with the pilgrim's moral confusion and ends with the vision of God.
  • Geometry.Net - Celebrities Books: Alighieri Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

^ A master's works Okay, everyone has heard of the "Divine Comedy," the medieval masterwork of legendary poet Dante Alighieri.
  • Geometry.Net - Celebrities Books: Alighieri Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

.Dante's other works include the Convivio ("The Banquet")[6] a collection of his longest poems with an (unfinished) allegorical commentary; Monarchia,[7] a summary treatise of political philosophy in Latin, which was condemned and burned after Dante's death[8][9] by the Papal Legate Bertrando del Poggetto, which argues for the necessity of a universal or global monarchy in order to establish universal peace in this life, and this monarchy's relationship to the Roman Catholic Church as guide to eternal peace; De vulgari eloquentia ("On the Eloquence of Vernacular"),[10] on vernacular literature, partly inspired by the Razos de trobar of Raimon Vidal de Bezaudun; and, La Vita Nuova ("The New Life"),[11] the story of his love for Beatrice Portinari, who also served as the ultimate symbol of salvation in the Comedy. The Vita Nuova contains many of Dante's love poems in Tuscan, which was not unprecedented; the vernacular had been regularly used for lyric works before, during all the thirteenth century.^ His life was given direction by his spiritual love for Beatrice Portinari (d.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Again failing to appear, on March 10, 1302, Dante and 14 other Whites were condemned to be burned to death.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

^ "La Vita Nuova" (The New Life) is only loosely connected with the "Comedy."
  • Geometry.Net - Celebrities Books: Alighieri Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

.One of the most famous poems is Tanto gentile e tanto onesta pare, which many Italians can recite by heart.^ His Purgatorio is written on the same plan, and presents what to many is the most attractive part of the Divine Comedy in the form of a readable English poem.
  • S.FW - The Purgatorio 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.sfw.org [Source type: Original source]

^ He sent an early sonnet, which was to become the first poem in the Vita nuova, to the most famous poets of his day.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Milton has transferred this conceit, though scarcely worth the pains of removing, into one of his Italian poems, son.
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

.However, Dante's commentary on his own work is also in the vernacular - both in the Vita Nuova and in the Convivio - instead of the Latin that was almost universally used.^ Dante writes his Vita Nuova.
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Several years after the composition of the Vita Nuova," says Boccaccio, " Dante, as he looked down from the high places of the government of * i.e.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Because of this intellectual indebtedness, Dante dedicated his Vita nuova to Cavalcantito his best friend (primo amico).
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

.References to Divina Commedia are in the format (book, canto, verse), e.g., (Inferno, XV, 76).^ Inferno: Canto XV Now bears us onward one of the hard margins, nbsp; nbsp; And so the brooklet's mist o'ershadows it, nbsp; nbsp; From fire it saves the water and the dikes.
  • Divine Comedy Inferno The Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

^ See Ciaccos prophecy and Inferno Canto VI:64-93 for an indirect reference.
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri - IndexAB. 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC poetryintranslation.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Inferno Canto XV:100-124 .
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri - IndexAB. 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC poetryintranslation.com [Source type: Original source]

References

  1. ^ Bloom, Harold (1994). The Western Canon. 
  2. ^ "Dante: the Significance of Title, The Divine Comedy" (in English). English Language Studies. Tyler Junior College. http://english.tjc.edu/engl2332nbyr/dantetitle.htm. Retrieved 23 February 2010. 
  3. ^ Malcolm Moore "Dante's infernal crimes forgiven", Daily Telegraph, 17 June 2008. Retrieved on 18 June 2008.
  4. ^ Pullella, Philip (January 12, 2007). "Dante gets posthumous nose job - 700 years on". statesman (Reuters). http://www.reuters.com/article/oddlyEnoughNews/idUSL1171092320070112. Retrieved 2007-11-05. 
  5. ^ Benazzi S. (2009). "The face of the poet Dante Alighieri reconstructed by virtual modelling and forensic anthropology techniques". Journal of archaeological science 36 (2):278–283. doi:10.1016/j.jas.2008.09.006
  6. ^ "Banquet". Dante online. http://www.danteonline.it/english/opere.asp?idope=2&idlang=UK. Retrieved 2008-09-02. 
  7. ^ "Monarchia". Dante online. http://www.danteonline.it/english/opere.asp?idope=4&idlang=UK. Retrieved 2008-09-02. 
  8. ^ Anthony K. Cassell The Monarchia Controversy. The Monarchia stayed on the Index Librorum Prohibitorum from its inception until 1881.
  9. ^ Giuseppe Cappelli,La divina commedia di Dante Alighieri, in Italian.
  10. ^ "De vulgari Eloquentia". Dante online. http://www.danteonline.it/english/opere.asp?idope=3&idlang=UK. Retrieved 2008-09-02. 
  11. ^ "New Life". Dante online. http://www.danteonline.it/english/opere.asp?idope=5&idlang=UK. Retrieved 2008-09-02. 

Further reading

  • Gardner, Edmund Garratt (1921). Dante, London, Pub. for the British academy by H. Milford, Oxford University Press.
  • Hede, Jesper. (2007). Reading Dante: The Pursuit of Meaning. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.
  • Raffa, Guy P. (2009). .The Complete Danteworlds: A Reader's Guide to the Divine Comedy.^ Some volumes of the complete Divine Comedy I have seen are just unwieldly; they are too tall or too thick to comfortably read while kicking back in a chair or lounging in bed.
    • Geometry.Net - Celebrities Books: Alighieri Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

    ^ The Guide: "Now tell then of the other culprits; INFERNO 81 THE DIVINE COMEDY −− INFERNO nbsp; nbsp; Knowest thou any one who is a Latian, nbsp; nbsp; Under the pitch?"
    • Divine Comedy Inferno The Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ The Divine Comedy was possibly begun prior to 1308 and completed just before his death in 1321, but the exact dates are uncertain.
    • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

    University of Chicago Press. ISBN 9780226702704.
     
  • Scott, John A. (1996). Dante's Political Purgatory, Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press.
  • Seung, T. K. (1962). The Fragile Leaves of the Sibyl: Dante's Master Plan. .Westminster, MD: Newman Press.
  • Toynbee, Paget (1898) A Dictionary of the Proper Names and Notable Matters in the Works of Dante.^ See Paget Toynbee: A Biographical Notice of Dante in the 1494 edition of the Speculum Historiale (in Eng.
    • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Dante Alighieri: His Life and Works by Paget Toynbee .
    • Geometry.Net - Celebrities Books: Alighieri Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

    London, The Clarendon Press.
  • Whiting, Mary Bradford (1922). .Dante the Man and the Poet.^ But suddenly he is rescued ("Not man; man I once was") by the legendary poet Virgil, who takes the despondent Dante under his wing -- and down into Hell.
    • Geometry.Net - Celebrities Books: Alighieri Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

    Cambridge, England. W. Heffer & Sons, ltd.

External links

Portrait de Dante.jpg Dante Alighieri (1265–1321)
Works in Latin: De vulgari eloquentia • De Monarchia • Eclogues • Letters
Works in Italian: La Vita Nuova • Le Rime • Convivio
Divina Commedia: Inferno • Purgatorio • Paradiso


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

Here must all distrust be left behind; all cowardice must be ended.
.Durante degli Alighieri, better known as Dante, (c.^ To this day, Dante Alighieri is known as the "Father of the Modern Italian Language" for his writing and efforts to put into use one common language.
  • Dominique Liana Russo as Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.nyu.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Durante Alighiero known to us as Dante Alighieri was born of a Guelph family in the spring of 1265 in Florence, Italy.
  • Dominique Liana Russo as Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.nyu.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Dante, son of Alighieri degli Alighieri and Bella, is born at Florence.
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

.1 June 126513/14 September 1321) was an Italian Florentine poet.^ Italian poet (1265-1321) 1902 Encyclopedia > Dante .
  • Dante Alighieri. Italian poet (1265-1321) 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante Alighieri Italian poet (1265-1321) .
  • Dante Alighieri. Italian poet (1265-1321) 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante's death, September 14, 1321.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

.His greatest work, La divina commedia (The Divine Comedy), is considered the greatest literary statement produced in Europe in the medieval period, and the basis of the modern Italian language.^ His weapon wasnt forged at the stone with fire and iron; instead his weapon was his poetry; La Divina Commedia-phrased in the literary structure known as terza rima.
  • Dominique Liana Russo as Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.nyu.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Salvador Dali gave final approval for each of the more than 3,000 blocks used in the Divine Comedy project as well as the engravings which were produced from them.

^ The Divine Comedy (Italian: Commedia , later christened " Divina " by Giovanni Boccaccio), written by Dante Alighieri between 1308 and his death in 1321, is widely considered the central epic poem of Italian literature, the last great work of literature of the Middle Ages and the first great work of the Renaissance, and one of the greatest works of world literature.
  • Divine Comedy - Monstropedia - the largest encyclopedia about monsters 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.monstropedia.org [Source type: General]

Contents

Sourced

.
Love hath so long possessed me for his own
And made his lordship so familiar.
  • Love hath so long possessed me for his own
    And made his lordship so familiar.^ For she loved you before you existed, preparing and ordering your coming; and after you were made, she came to you in your own likeness in order to place you on the straight way.
    • Dante Alighieri (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "O glory and light of all other poets, May the long study and the profound love That made me search your work come to my aid!
    • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • La Vita Nuova (1293)
  • Behold a God more powerful than I who comes to rule over me.^ La vita nuova (c.
    • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ La Vita Nuova (1293?
    • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Moreover God has made the power of her grace even greater, for no one who has spoken with her can come to a bad end.
    • Dante Alighieri (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • La Vita Nuova (1293)
  • Love with delight discourses in my mind
    Upon my lady's admirable gifts...^ It was a perfect gift, my son loved it.
    • Geometry.Net - Celebrities Books: Alighieri Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

    ^ La Vita Nuova (1293?
    • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Love that discourses in my thoughts."
    • The Divine Comedy of Dante 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]
    • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]


    Beyond the range of human intellect.
    • Il Convivio, Trattato Terzo, line 1

The Divine Comedy

Various translations have been used in this section.

The Inferno

.
Abandon every hope, ye who enter here.
  • Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita,
    Mi ritrovai per una selva oscura,
    Che la diritta via era smarrita.
    • When I had journeyed half of our life's way,
      I found myself within a shadowed forest,
      for I had lost the path that does not stray.
    • Canto I, lines 1-3
  • E come quei che con lena affannata,
    uscito fuor del pelago a la riva,
    si volge a l'acqua perigliosa e guata.
    • And just as he who, with exhausted breath,
      having escaped from the sea to shore,
      turns to the perilous waters and gazes.
    • Canto I, lines 22-24
  • Lasciate ogni speranza, voi ch'entrate.
    • All hope abandon, ye who enter in.
    • Canto III, line 9
    • Frequently translated as "Abandon hope, all ye who enter here",[1] but "all" modifies hope, not those who enter: “ogni speranza” means “all hope”.
  • Qui si convien lasciare ogne sospetto;
    ogne viltà convien che qui sia morta.
    • Here one must leave behind all hesistation;
      here every cowardice must meet its death.
    • Canto III, lines 14-15
  • Quivi sospiri, pianti e alti guai
    risonavan per l'aere sanza stelle,
    per ch'io al cominciar ne lagrimai.^ "If ye desire to mount," He cried, "here must ye turn.
    • The Divine Comedy of Dante 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]
    • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ THE DIVINE COMEDY −− INFERNO 2 INFERNO Inferno: Canto I Midway upon the journey of our life nbsp; nbsp; I found myself within a forest dark, nbsp; nbsp; For the straightforward pathway had been lost.
    • Divine Comedy Inferno The Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita...
    • Dante's Divine comedy - Civilization Fanatics' Forums 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC forums.civfanatics.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]


    Diverse lingue, orribili favelle,
    parole di dolore, accenti d'ira,
    voci alte e fioche, e suon di man con elle
    facevano un tumolto, il qual s'aggira
    sempre in quell'aura sanza tempo tinta,
    come la rena quando turbo spira.
    • Their sighs, lamentations and loud wailings
      resounded through the starless air,
      so that at first it made me weep;
      Strange utterances, horrible pronouncements,
      words of pain, tones of anger,
      voices shrill and faint, and beating hands,
      all went to make a tumult that will whirl
      forever through that turbid, timeless air,
      like sand that eddies when a whirlwind swirls.
    • Canto III, lines 22-30
  • Questo misero modo
    tegnon l'anime triste di coloro
    che visser sanza 'nfamia e sanza lodo.
    • This miserable state
      is borne by the wretched souls of those
      who lived without disgrace and without praise.
    • Canto III, lines 34-36
  • Caccianli i ciel per non esser men belli,
    né lo profondo inferno li riceve,
    ch'alcuna gloria i rei avrebber d'elli.
    • Heaven, to keep its beauty,
      cast them out, but even Hell itself would not receive them
      for fear the wicked there might glory over them.
    • Canto III, lines 40-42
  • Vidi e conobbi l'ombra di colui
    che per viltade fece il gran rifiuto.
    • I saw and I knew the soul of him,
      who cowardly made the great refusal.
    • Canto III, lines 59-60
    • The decision of Pope Celestine V to abdicate the Papacy and allow Dante's enemy, Pope Boniface VIII, to gain power.
  • Incontanente intesti e certo fui
    che questa era la setta d'i cattivi
    a Dio spiacenti e a' nemici sui.
    • At once I understood,
      and I was sure this was that sect of evil souls who were
      hateful to God and to His enemies.
    • Canto III, lines 61-63
  • Sanza speme vivemo in disio.
    • Without hope we live in desire.
    • Canto IV, line 42
  • Io venni in loco d'ogne luce muto,
    che mugghia come fa mar per tempesta,
    se da contrari venti è combattuto.
    • I came into a place void of all light,
      which bellows like the sea in tempest,
      when it is combated by warring winds.
    • Canto V, lines 28-30
Love, which is quickly kindled in the gentle heart, seized this man for the fair form that was taken from me, and the manner still hurts me...
  • Amor, ch'al cor gentil ratto s'apprende,
    prese costui de la bella persona
    che mi fu tolta; e 'l modo ancor m'offende.
    • Love, which is quickly kindled in the gentle heart,
      seized this man for the fair form that was
      taken from me, and the manner still hurts me.
    • Canto V, lines 100-102
  • Amor, ch'a nullo amato amar perdona,
    mi prese del costui piacer sì forte,
    che, come vedi, ancor non m'abbandona.
    • Love, which absolves no beloved one from loving,
      seized me so strongly with his charm
      that, as thou seest, it does not leave me yet.
    • Canto V, lines 103-105
  • Nessun maggior dolore
    Che ricordarsi del tempo felice
    Nella miseria.
    • There is no greater sorrow
      Than to be mindful of the happy time
      In misery.
    • Canto V, lines 121-123
  • Superbia, invidia e avarizia sono
    le tre faville c'hanno i cuori accesi.
    • Pride, Envy, and Avarice are
      the three sparks that have set these hearts on fire.
    • Canto VI, lines 74-75
  • Necessità 'l ci 'nduce, e non diletto.
    • Necessity brings him here, not pleasure.
    • Canto XII, line 87
  • Bene ascolta chi la nota.
    • He listens well who takes notes.
    • Canto XV, line 99
  • ...Seggendo in piuma
    in fama non si vien, né sotto coltre,
    sanza la qual chi sua vita consuma
    cotal vestigo in terra di sé lascia
    qual fummo in aere ed in acqua la schiuma.
    • Lying in a featherbed
      will bring you no fame, nor staying beneath the quilt,
      and he who uses up his life without achieving fame
      leaves no more vestige of himself on Earth
      than smoke in the air or foam upon the water.
    • Canto XXIV, lines 47-51
  • La dimanda onesta
    si de' seguir con l'opera tacendo.
    • A fair request should be followed by the deed in silence.
    • Canto XXIV, lines 77-78
  • Considerate la vostra semenza:
    fatti non foste a viver come bruti,
    ma per seguir virtute e canoscenza.
    • Consider your origin;
      you were not born to live like brutes,
      but to follow virtue and knowledge.
    • Canto XXVI, lines 118-120
  • S'i' credesse che mia risposta fosse
    a persona che mai tornasse al mondo,
    questa fiamma staria sanza più scosse;
    ma però che già mai di questo fondo
    non tornò vivo alcun, s'i' odo il vero,
    sanza tema d'infamia ti ris pondo.
    • If I thought my answer were to one
      who would ever return to the world,
      this flame should stay without another movement; but since none
      ever returned alive from thisdepth, if what I hear is true,
      I answer thee without fear of infamy.
    • Canto XXVII, lines 61-66
  • Tra le gambe pendevan le minugia;
    la corata pareva e 'l tristo sacco
    che merda fa di quel che si trangugia.
    • Between his legs were hanging down his entrails;
      His heart was visible, and the dismal sack
      that maketh excrement of what is eaten.
    • Canto XXVIII, lines 25-27; translation by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
  • "Vexilla regis prodeunt inferni
    verso di noi; però dinanzi mira,"
    disse 'l maestro mio, "se tu 'l discerni."
  • "Vexilla regis prodeunt inferni
    towards us now; so look ahead and see,"
    my master said, "whether you can discern him."
    • Canto XXXIV, lines 1-3

Purgatorio

To run over better waters the little vessel of my genius now hoists her sails, as she leaves behind her a sea so cruel.
  • Per correr miglior acque alza le vele
    ornai la navicella del mio ingegno,
    che lascia dietro a sé mar sì crudele.
    • To run over better waters the little vessel of my genius now hoists her sails, as she leaves behind her a sea so cruel.
    • Canto I, lines 1-3
  • Libertà va cercando, ch'è sì cara,
    come sa chi per lei vita rifiuta.
    • He goes seeking liberty, which is so dear, as he knows who for it renounces life.
    • Canto I, lines 71-72
  • O dignitosa coscïenza, e netta,
    come t'è piccioli fallo amaro morso!
    • O conscience, upright and stainless, how bitter sting to thee is a little fault!
    • Canto III, lines 8-9
  • Se orazïone in prima non m'aita
    che surga sù di cuor che in grazia viva;
    l'altra che val, che 'n ciel non è udita?
    • Unless, before then, the prayer assist me which rises from a heart that lives in grace: what avails the other, which is not heard in heaven?
    • Canto IV, lines 133-135
  • Che sempre l'omo in cui pensier rampolla
    sovra pensier, da sé dilunga il sengo,
    perché la foga l'un de l'altro insolla.
    • For always the man in whom thought springs up over thought sets his mark farther off, for the one thought saps the force of the other.
    • Canto V, lines 16-18
.
Do not rest in so profound a doubt except she tell it thee, who shall be a light between truth and intellect.
^ We to her eyes will lead thee; but the light Of gladness that is in them, well to scan, Those yonder three, of deeper ken than ours, Thy sight shall quicken."
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

^ I thus inquiring; he forthwith replied: "If I have power to show one truth, soon that Shall face thee, which thy questioning declares Behind thee now conceal'd.
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

^ And I: 'O Creature who thyself dost purify So that thou mayst be fit for fair return To Him who made thee, keep beside, and learn A marvel I will tell thee.'
  • S.FW - The Purgatorio 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.sfw.org [Source type: Original source]

.I know not if thou understand: I speak of Beatrice.
  • Veramente a così alto sospetto
    non ti fermar, se quella nol ti dice
    che lume fia tra 'l vero e lo 'ntelletto.^ Io veggio ben che già mai non si sazia nostro intelletto, se ‘l ver non lo illustra di fuor dal qual nessun vero si spazia.
    • Dante Alighieri (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I know not if thou take me right; I mean Beatrice.
    • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And he: 'What reason tells, my words can show, But further of these marvels wouldst thou know, Then for Beatrice wait.
    • S.FW - The Purgatorio 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.sfw.org [Source type: Original source]


    .Non so se 'ntendi; io dico di Beatrice.
    • Do not rest in so profound a doubt except she tell it thee, who shall be a light between truth and intellect.^ Io veggio ben che già mai non si sazia nostro intelletto, se ‘l ver non lo illustra di fuor dal qual nessun vero si spazia.
      • Dante Alighieri (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

      ^ We to her eyes will lead thee; but the light Of gladness that is in them, well to scan, Those yonder three, of deeper ken than ours, Thy sight shall quicken."
      • The Divine Comedy of Dante 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]
      • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

      ^ I thus inquiring; he forthwith replied: "If I have power to show one truth, soon that Shall face thee, which thy questioning declares Behind thee now conceal'd.
      • The Divine Comedy of Dante 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]
      • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

      I know not if thou understand: I speak of Beatrice.
    • Canto VI, lines 43-46
  • Era già l'ora che volge il disio
    ai navicanti e 'ntenerisce il core
    lo di ch'an detto ai dolci amici addio;
    e che lo novo peregrin d'amore
    punge, se ode squilla di lontano
    che paia il giorno pianger che si more.
    • It was now the hour that turns back the longing of seafarers and melts their hearts, the day they have bidden dear friends farewell, and pierces the new traveler with love if he hears in the distance the bell that seems to mourn the dying day.
    • Canto VIII, lines 1-6
.
Worldly renown is naught but a breath of wind, which now comes this way and now comes that, and changes name because it changes quarter.
  • Dà oggi a noi la cotidiana manna,
    sanza la qual per questo aspro diserto
    a retro va chi più di gir s'affanna.
    • Give us this day the daily manna, without which, in this rough desert, he backward goes, who toils most to go on.
    • Canto XI, lines 13-15
  • Non è il mondan romore altro ch'un fiato
    di vento, ch'or vien quinci e or vien quindi,
    e muta nome perché muta lato.
    • Worldly renown is naught but a breath of wind, which now comes this way and now comes that, and changes name because it changes quarter.
    • Canto XI, lines 100-102
  • O gene umana, per volar sù nata,
    perché a poco vento così cadi?
    • O human race, born to fly upward, wherefore at a little wind dost thou so fall?
    • Canto XII, lines 95-96
  • A maggior forza e a miglior natura
    liberi soggiacete; e quella cria
    la mente in voi, che 'l ciel no ha in sua cura.^ Thou art come To Purgatory now.
    • The Divine Comedy of Dante 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]
    • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ While this rough desert with slow toil we tread, Give us the manna of our daily bread.
    • S.FW - The Purgatorio 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.sfw.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Voi ch' intendendo il terzo ciel movete.
    • The Divine Comedy of Dante 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]
    • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]


    .Però, se 'l mondo presente disvia,
    in voi è la cagione, in voi si cheggia.
    • To a greater force, and to a better nature, you, free, are subject, and that creates the mind in you, which the heavens have not in their charge.^ To mightier force, To better nature subject, ye abide Free, not constrain'd by that, which forms in you The reasoning mind uninfluenc'd of the stars.
      • The Divine Comedy of Dante 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]
      • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

      ^ "And were it not for the hot darting fire Which the nature of this place rains down on them, Id say haste suits you better than it does them."
      • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

      ^ Power more high And better nature will their strengths ally, Creating in you that which destiny Is futile to confound: the will to shape, Or else endure.
      • S.FW - The Purgatorio 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.sfw.org [Source type: Original source]

      Therefore if the present world go astray, the cause is in you, in you it is to be sought.
    • Canto XVI, lines 79-83
  • Ciascun confusamente un bene apprende
    nel qual si questi l'animo, e disira;
    per che di giugner lui ciascun contende.
    • Everyone confusedly conceives of a good in which the mind may be at rest, and desires it; wherefore everyone strives to attain it.
    • Canto XVII, lines 127-129
  • Amore,
    acceso di virtù, sempre altro accese,
    pur che la fiamma sua paresse fore.
    • Love kindled by virtue always kindles another, provided that its flame appear outwardly.
    • Canto XXII, lines 10-12
  • Men che dramma
    di sangue m'è rimaso, che no tremi;
    conosco i segni dell' antica fiamma.
    • Less than a drop of blood remains in me that does not tremble; I recognize the signals of the ancient flame.
    • Canto XXX, lines 46-48
  • Ma tanto più maligno e più silvestro
    si fa 'l terren col mal seme e non cólto,
    quant' elli ha più di buon vigor terrestro.
    • But so much the more malign and wild does the ground become with bad seed and untilled, as it has the more of good earthly vigor.
    • Canto XXX, lines 118-120
  • Puro e disposto a salire a le stelle.
    • Pure and disposed to mount unto the stars.
    • Canto XXXIII, line 145

Paradiso

I saw within Its depth how It conceives all things in a single volume bound by Love, of which the universe is the scattered leaves.
  • La gloria di colui che tutto move
    per l'universo penetra, e risplende
    in una parte piú e meno altrove.
    • The glory of Him who moves everything penetrates through the universe, and is resplendent in one part more and in another less.
    • Canto I, lines 1-3
  • Poca favilla gran fiamma seconda.
    • A great flame follows a little spark.
    • Canto I, line 34
  • E 'n la sua volontade è nostra pace.
    • And in His will is our peace.
    • Canto III, line 85
  • Lo maggior don che Dio per sua larghezza
    fesse creando, e a la sua bontate
    più conformato, e quel ch'e' più apprezza,
    fu de la volontà la libertate;
    di che le creature intelligenti,
    e tutte e sole, fuore e son dotate.
    • The greatest gift that God in His bounty made in creation, and the most conformable to His goodness, and that which He prizes the most, was the freedom of will, with which the creatures with intelligence, they all and they alone, were and are endowed.
    • Canto V, lines 19-24
  • Tu proverai sì come sa di sale
    lo pane altrui, e come è duro calle
    lo scendere e 'l salir per l'altrui scale.
    • Thou shalt prove how salt is the taste of another's bread and how hard is the way up and down another man's stairs.
    • Canto XVII, lines 58-60
  • Però ne la giustizia sempiterna
    la vista che riceve il vostro mondo,
    com' occhio per lo mare, entro s'interna;
    che, ben che da la proda veggia il fondo,
    in pelago nol vede; e nondimeno
    èli, ma cela lui l'esser profondo.
    • Therefore the sight that is granted to your world penetrates within the Eternal Justice as the eye into the sea; for though from the shore it sees the bottom, in the open sea it does not, and yet the bottom is there but the depth conceals it.
    • Canto XIX, lines 58-63
  • L'esperîenza
    di questa dolce vita.
    • The experience of this sweet life.
    • Canto XX, lines 47-48
  • Quale allodetta che 'n aere si spazia
    prima cantando, e poi tace contenta
    de l'ultima dolcezza che la sazia,
    tal mi sembiò l'imago de la 'mprenta
    de l'etterno piacere.
    • Like the lark that soars in the air, first singing, then silent, content with the last sweetness that satiates it, such seemed to me that image, the imprint of the Eternal Pleasure.
    • Canto XX, lines 73-77
  • La notte che le cose ci nasconde.
    • The night that hides things from us.
    • Canto XXIII, line 3
  • Di quel color che per lo sole avverso
    nube dipigne da sera e da mane,
    vid' îo allora tutto 'l ciel cosperso.
    • With the color that paints the morning and evening clouds that face the sun I saw then the whole heaven suffused.
    • Canto XXVII, lines 28-30
  • Nel suo profondo vidi che s'interna,
    legato con amore in un volume,
    ciò che per l'universo si squaderna.
    • I saw within Its depth how It conceives all things in a single volume bound by Love, of which the universe is the scattered leaves.
    • Canto XXXIII, lines 85-87
    • The Portable Dante : Revised Edition (Viking Portable Library) (Paperback) Mark Musa, Translator.
  • L'amor che muove il sole e l'altre stelle.
    • The Love which moves the sun and the other stars.
    • Canto XXXIII, line 145 (last line)

Misattributed

.
  • The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who in times of great moral crisis maintain their neutrality.^ Minos talks to those who come to the Palace, and once he has determined the best place for them, sends them to the appropriate part of Hell, wrapping them up in his tail, which extends off and carries the sinner away.

    ^ But the wise poet confounded the donkey-driver, and at the same time won the commendation of every one who had witnessed what took place."
    • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And he to me: "This miserable mode nbsp; nbsp; Maintain the melancholy souls of those nbsp; nbsp; Who lived withouten infamy or praise.
    • Divine Comedy Inferno The Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    • John F. Kennedy misquoting Dante (24 June 1963) . Dante placed those who "non furon ribelli né fur fedeli" — were neither for nor against God, in a special region near the mouth of Hell; the lowest part of Hell, a lake of ice, was for traitors.

Quotes about Dante

Alphabetized by author
.
  • And you, beloved children, whose lot it is to promote learning under the magisterium of the Church, continue as you are doing to love and tend the noble poet whom We do not hesitate to call the most eloquent singer of the Christian idea.^ But if you do not find her meaning clear, You've many Brother Alberts hard at hand, Whose wisdom will respond to any call.
    • Brunetto Latino and Dante Alighieri. The Vita Nuova: Paradigms of Pilgrimage 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.florin.ms [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ Nicholas III, of the Orsini family, whom the poet therefore calls "figliuol dell' orsa," "son of the she-bear."
    • The Divine Comedy of Dante - Full Text Free Book (Part 3/11) 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
    • The Divine Comedy of Dante 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]
    • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "It should be known," he says, "that Dante had a sister, who was married to one of our citizens, called Leon Poggi, by whom she had several children.
    • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
  • Dante does not come before us as a large catholic mind; rather as a narrow, and even sectarian mind: it is partly the fruit of his age and position, but partly too of his own nature.^ From ground It came not - rather from the boughs around It beat upon us, as voiced by those who hid Before our coming, the tangled growth amid.
    • S.FW - The Inferno 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.sfw.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Here it is morn when it is evening there; nbsp; nbsp; And he who with his hair a stairway made us nbsp; nbsp; Still fixed remaineth as he was before.
    • Divine Comedy Inferno The Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Dante, too, is deeply concerned to define and justify his own position as a voice of wisdom for his contemporaries.
    • Dante Alighieri (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .His greatness has, in all senses, concentred itself into fiery emphasis and depth.^ "That all the world," said I, "should have bee turn'd To Christian, and no miracle been wrought, Would in itself be such a miracle, The rest were not an hundredth part so great.
    • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ 'The Happy Goth' starts all sad, moves into a pop thing, has depth.
    • adriandenning.co.uk : The Divine Comedy 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.adriandenning.com [Source type: General]

    .He is world-great not because he is world-wide, but because he is world-deep.^ Deep sorrow crushed my heart when I heard him, Because both men and women of great worth 45 I knew to be suspended here in limbo.
    • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Through all objects he pierces as it were down into the heart of Being.^ 'Down from midHeaven, through all its splendours, came separate intense, a tiny orb of flame, that when it reached her, ringed her round complete, a crown of light, pulsating.

    ^ Through all the sombre circles of this Hell, nbsp; nbsp; Spirit I saw not against God so proud, nbsp; nbsp; Not he who fell at Thebes down from the walls!
    • Divine Comedy Inferno The Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ And I my heart all but pierced by the sight Spoke up, "My master, now instruct me here.
    • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

    .I know nothing so intense as Dante.^ This is a joke on them in Dante's mind because after the Final Judgment time ends, those in hell would know nothing.
    • Divine Comedy - Monstropedia - the largest encyclopedia about monsters 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.monstropedia.org [Source type: General]

    ^ This is a joke on them in Dante's mind, because after the Final Judgment time ends, so those in hell would know nothing.
    • The Divine Comedy at AllExperts 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Thomas Carlyle, in "The Hero as Poet" from Heroes and Hero-Worship (1841)
  • I want my illustrations for the Dante to be like the faint markings of moisture in a divine cheese...^ One of 100 illustrations from Dante's "Divine Comedy," published by Les Heures Claires, Paris.

    ^ I mark'd the hunt, and waxing out of bounds In gladness, lifted up my shameless brow, And like the merlin cheated by a gleam, Cried, "It is over.
    • The Divine Comedy of Dante 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Gustave Doré engravings illustrated The Divine Comedy (1861-1868), here Dante is lost in Canto 1.
    • Divine Comedy - Monstropedia - the largest encyclopedia about monsters 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.monstropedia.org [Source type: General]

    Mysticism is cheese; Christ is cheese, better still, mountains of cheese!
  • Dante will always be admired, because no one ever read him.^ EL] Some read UN, "One," instead of EL: but the latter of these readings is confirmed by a passage from Dante's Treatise De Vulg.
    • The Divine Comedy of Dante 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]
    • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Then Dante has Latini recommend to him __ and to us __ the reading of the Tesoro : 59 (vv.
    • Holloway: Chancery and Comedy: Brunetto Latini and Dante Alighieri 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.brown.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ And he admiring much, as he was void Of wisdom, will'd me to declare to him The secret of mine art: and only hence, Because I made him not a Daedalus, Prevail'd on one suppos'd his sire to burn me.
    • The Divine Comedy of Dante 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]
    • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

See also

External links

Wikipedia
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Bible wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From BibleWiki

.Italian poet, born at Florence, 1265; died at Ravenna, Italy, 14 September, 1321. His own statement in the "Paradiso" (xxii, 112-117) that he was born when the sun was in Gemini, fixes his birthday between 18 May and 17 June.^ He died in Ravenna in 1321.
  • The Annotico Report: Dante Alighieri Pardoned 700 Years Later - - What a Relief !!!! 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.annoticoreport.com [Source type: General]

^ BIOGRAPHY Dante was born in Florence in 1265.
  • Gale - Free Resources - Poet's Corner - Biographies - Dante (Alighieri) 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.gale.cengage.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ He finally died in Ravenna in 1321.
  • Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.goodreads.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.He was the son of Alighiero di Bellincione Alighieri, a notary belonging to an ancient but decadent Guelph family, by his first wife, Bella, who was possibly a daughter of Durante di Scolaio Abati, a Ghibelline noble.^ Alighieri, Alighiero son of Cacciaguida .
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri - IndexAB. 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC poetryintranslation.com [Source type: Original source]

^ He was the son of Alighiero di Bellincione Alighieri, a notary belonging to an ancient but decadent Guelph family , by his first wife, Bella, who was possibly a daughter of Durante di Scolaio Abati, a Ghibelline noble.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ His father was Alighiero di Bellincione Alighieri, a notary from a family loyal to the Guelphs.

.A few months after the poet's birth, the victory of Charles of Anjou over King Manfred at Benevento (26 February, 1266) ended the power of the empire in Italy, placed a French dynasty upon the throne of Naples, and secured the predominance of the Guelphs in Tuscany.^ Charles of Anjou puts Conradine to death, and becomes King of Naples.
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Charles II. king of Naples, dies.
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

^ On 26 February the Battle of Benevento was fought, Charles of Anjou being victorious over King Manfred.
  • brunetto 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.florin.ms [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Dante thus grew up amidst the triumphs of the Florentine democracy, in which he took some share fighting in the front rank of the Guelph cavalry at the battle of Campaldino (11 June, 1289), when the Tuscan Ghibellines were defeated by the forces of the Guelph league, of which Florence was the head.^ On June 11, 1289, at Campaldino near Poppi, in the Cassentino, the Ghibellines were utterly defeated.
  • Dante Alighieri. Italian poet (1265-1321) 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante thus grew up amidst the triumphs of the Florentine democracy, in ...
  • Search results for "Dante Alighieri" - Wikisource 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC en.wikisource.org [Source type: Reference]

^ Dante thus grew up amidst the triumphs of the Florentine democracy, in which he took some share fighting in the front rank of the Guelph cavalry at the battle of Campaldino (11 June, 1289), when the Tuscan Ghibellines were defeated by the forces of the Guelph league, of which Florence was the head.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

.This victory was followed by a reformation of the Florentine constitution, associated with the name of Giano della Bella, a great-hearted noble who had joined the people.^ Bella, Giano della .
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri - IndexAB. 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC poetryintranslation.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Giano della Bella as podestà of Pistoia.
  • Brunetto Latino and Dante Alighieri. Stealing Hercules' Club: Inferno XXV's Metamorphoses 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.umilta.net [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ This victory was followed by a reformation of the Florentine constitution, associated with the name of Giano della Bella, a great-hearted noble who had joined the people.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri: birth, biography, bibliography and pictures 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.onelittleangel.com [Source type: General]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

.By the Ordinances of Justice (1293) all nobles and magnates were more strictly excluded from the government, and subjected to severe penalties for offences against plebeians.^ By the Ordinances of Justice (1293) all nobles and magnates were more strictly excluded from the government, and subjected to severe penalties for offences against plebeians.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri: birth, biography, bibliography and pictures 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.onelittleangel.com [Source type: General]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Aeneid Seven Against Thebes Quia Presentation Quia Online Teaching In Ceu Nicenet View all presentations from this user More info about this document .

^ I know not if she ceased, or told me more, For in my captive sight again was she Who all beside excluded.
  • S.FW - The Purgatorio 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.sfw.org [Source type: Original source]

.To take any part in public life, it was necessary to be enrolled in one or other of the "Arts" (the guilds in which the burghers and artisans were banded together), and accordingly Dante matriculated in the guild of physicians and apothecaries.^ Enrolls in the guild of physicians and apothecaries.
  • Dante's Inferno Game | Explore The Inferno 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.dantesinferno.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ To take any part in public life, it was necessary to be enrolled in one or other of the "Arts" (the guilds in which the burghers and artisans were banded together), and accordingly Dante matriculated in the guild of physicians and apothecaries.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In 1295 he entered the Guild of member Apothecaries, to which philosophers could belong, and which opened for him the doors to public office.

.On 6 July, 1295, he spoke in the General Council of the Commune in favour of some modification in the Ordinances of Justice after which his name is frequently found recorded as speaking or voting in the various councils of the republic.^ On 6 July, 1295, he spoke in the General Council of the Commune in favour of some modification in the Ordinances of Justice after which his name is frequently found recorded as speaking or voting in the various councils of the republic.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante served the commune in various councils and was ambassador to San Gimignano in 1300 and then to Rome.
  • Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.kirjasto.sci.fi [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.websophia.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri Biography & Bibliography - Litweb.net 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.litweb.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Roughly speaking, the Bianchi were the constitutional party, supporting the burgher government and the Ordinances of Justice ; the Neri , at once more turbulent and more aristocratic, relied on the support of the populace, and were strengthened by the favour of the pope, who disliked and mistrusted the recent developments of the democratic policy of the republic.
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

.Already Dante had written his first book, the "Vita Nuova", or "New Life", an exquisite medley of lyrical verse and poetic prose, telling the story of his love for Beatrice, whom he had first seen at the end of his ninth year.^ Main Early life and the Vita nuova .
  • Dante (Italian poet) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ He recorded this devotion in an early work Vita Nuova (A New Life) .
  • The Divine Comedy: Inferno: Dante Alighieri Biography - CliffsNotes 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.cliffsnotes.com [Source type: General]

^ Dante had already fallen in love with another girl whom he called Beatrice.
  • Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.kirjasto.sci.fi [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.websophia.com [Source type: Original source]

Beatrice, who was probably the daughter of Folco Portinari, and wife of Simone de' Bardi, died in June, 1290, and the "Vita Nuova" was completed about the year 1294. Dante's love for her was purely spiritual and mystical, the amor amicitiae defined by St. Thomas Aquinas: "That which is loved in love of friendship is loved simply and for its own sake". Its resemblance to the chivalrous worship that the troubadours offered to married women is merely superficial. The book is dedicated to the Florentine poet, Guido Cavalcanti, whom Dante calls "the first of my friends", and ends with the promise of writing concerning Beatrice "what has never before been written of any woman".
.At the beginning of 1300 the papal jubilee was proclaimed by Boniface VIII. It is doubtful whether Dante was among the pilgrims who flocked to Rome.^ It is doubtful whether Dante was among the pilgrims who flocked to Rome .
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Pope Boniface VIII proclaims Jubilee year.
  • Dante's Inferno Game | Explore The Inferno 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.dantesinferno.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ At the beginning of 1300 the papal jubilee was proclaimed by Boniface VIII. It is doubtful whether Dante was among the pilgrims who flocked to Rome.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

.Florence was in a disastrous condition, the ruling Guelph party having split into two factions, known as Bianchi and Neri, "Whites" and "Blacks", which were led by Vieri de' Cerchi and Corso Donati, respectively.^ The Guelfs were divided into the two factions of White Guelfs (Guelfi Bianchi) (led by Vieri dei Cerchi) and Black Guelfs (Guelfi Neri) (led by Corso Donati).
  • Dante Aligheieri - Biography 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.themiddleages.net [Source type: Original source]

^ The city of Florence, divided into the Bianchi and Neri factions.
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

^ It happened that Corso Donati and the heads of the Black party were absent at Pistoia.
  • Dante Alighieri. Italian poet (1265-1321) 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

.Roughly speaking, the Bianchi were the constitutional party, supporting the burgher government and the Ordinances of Justice; the Neri, at once more turbulent and more aristocratic, relied on the support of the populace, and were strengthened by the favour of the pope, who disliked and mistrusted the recent developments of the democratic policy of the republic.^ Roughly speaking, the Bianchi were the constitutional party, supporting the burgher government and the Ordinances of Justice ; the Neri , at once more turbulent and more aristocratic, relied on the support of the populace, and were strengthened by the favour of the pope, who disliked and mistrusted the recent developments of the democratic policy of the republic.
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Roughly speaking, the Bianchi were the constitutional party, supporting the burgher government and the Ordinances of Justice; the Neri, at once more turbulent and more aristocratic, relied on the support of the populace, and were strengthened by the favour of the pope, who disliked and mistrusted the recent developments of the democratic policy of the republic.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ More importantly, they were supporters of the pope.

.The discovery of a plot on the part of certain Florentines in the papal service (18 April) and a collision between the two factions, in which blood was shed (1 May), brought things to a crisis.^ The discovery of a plot on the part of certain Florentines in the papal service (18 April) and a collision between the two factions, in which blood was shed (1 May), brought things to a crisis.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Throughout the thirteenth century, Florence was embroiled in fighting between two political factions—the Guelfs, who favored papal authority, and the Ghibellines, who favored imperial authority.
  • The Divine Comedy Volume I: Inferno 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.greatbooks.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Penguin Reading Guides | The Divine Comedy Volume I: Inferno | Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC us.penguingroup.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Penguin Reading Guides | The Divine Comedy Volume I: Inferno | Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC booksellers.penguin.com [Source type: Original source]

^ His own statement in the "Paradiso" (xxii, 112-117) that he was born when the sun was in Gemini, fixes his birthday between 18 May and 17 June.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

.On 7 May Dante was sent on an unimportant embassy to San Gemignano.^ On 7 May Dante was sent on an unimportant embassy to San Gemignano.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ San Gemignano ; Dante's embassy to, 99-100.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In May of 1265, Dante Alighieri, of a family too unimportant or insufficiently Guelph to have been exiled from Florence, was born.
  • Holloway: Chancery and Comedy: Brunetto Latini and Dante Alighieri 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.brown.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Shortly after his return he was elected one of the six priors who for two months, together with the gonfaloniere, formed the Signoria, the chief magistracy of the republic.^ Shortly after his return he was elected one of the six priors who for two months, together with the gonfaloniere, formed the Signoria, the chief magistracy of the republic.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Shortly after his return he was elected one of the six priors who for two months, together with the gonfaloniere , formed the Signoria , the chief magistracy of the republic.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ He was sent on a diplomatic mission to San Gimignano in 1300 and later the same year was elected one of the six priors, or magistrates, of Florence, a post in which he served for only two months.
  • Di Dante Alighieri Biography 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC italian.classic-literature.co.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Dante Alighieri - Cosmeo 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.cosmeo.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • DANTE ALIGHIERI 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.history.com [Source type: General]

.His term of office was from 15 June to 15 August.^ His term of office was from 15 June to 15 August.
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ He is chosen chief magistrate, or first of the Priors of Florence; and continues in office from June 15 to August 15.
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

^ From June 15 to August 15, 1300, he held the office of prior, which was the source of all the miseries of his life.
  • Dante Alighieri. Italian poet (1265-1321) 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

Together with his colleagues. he confirmed the anti-Papal measures of his predecessors, banished the leaders of both factions, and offered such opposition to the papal legate, .Cardinal Matteo d'Acquasparta, that the latter returned to Rome and laid Florence under an interdict.^ Papal measures of his predecessors, banished the leaders of both factions, and offered such opposition to the papal legate , Cardinal Matteo d'Acquasparta, that the latter returned to Rome and laid Florence under an interdict .
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Papal measures of his predecessors, banished the leaders of both factions, and offered such opposition to the papal legate, Cardinal Matteo d'Acquasparta, that the latter returned to Rome and laid Florence under an interdict.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ He fled Florence and stayed under the protection of Bartolomeo della Scala in Verona, unable to ever return to Florence.
  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A295355 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.bbc.co.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Guido Cavalcanti had been among the exiled Bianchi; having contracted a fatal illness at Sarzana, he was allowed, together with the rest of his faction, to return to Florence, where he died at the end of August.^ Guido Cavalcanti had been among the exiled Bianchi ; having contracted a fatal illness at Sarzana, he was allowed, together with the rest of his faction, to return to Florence , where he died at the end of August.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Guido Cavalcanti had been among the exiled Bianchi; having contracted a fatal illness at Sarzana, he was allowed, together with the rest of his faction, to return to Florence, where he died at the end of August.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Guido Cavalcanti had been among the exiled Bianchi ; having contracted a fatal illness at Sarzana, he was allowed, together with the rest of his faction, to return to Florence, where he died at the end of August.
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

.This, however, was after Dante's term of office had ended.^ This, however, was after Dante's term of office had ended.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante himself, I believe, termed it simply "The Comedy;" in the first place, because the style was of the middle kind: and in the next, because the story (if story it may be called) ends happily.
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In Dante's time, the term 'comedy' did not mean what it does today; a comedy was a story with a happy ending, and did not imply humorous content.
  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A295355 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.bbc.co.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Enraged at this partial treatment, Corso Donati, in understanding with his adherents in Florence, appealed to the pope, who decided to send a French prince, Charles of Valois, with an armed force, as peacemaker.^ Enraged at this partial treatment, Corso Donati, in understanding with his adherents in Florence, appealed to the pope, who decided to send a French prince, Charles of Valois, with an armed force, as peacemaker.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Enraged at this partial treatment, Corso Donati, in understanding with his adherents in Florence , appealed to the pope , who decided to send a French prince, Charles of Valois, with an armed force, as peacemaker.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ But the party split into the Blacks, supported by Pope Boniface VIII because they encouraged his plan to bring Florence and Tuscany under papal control, and the Whites, who opposed this plan.
  • The Divine Comedy Volume I: Inferno 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.greatbooks.org [Source type: Original source]

.We find Dante, in 1301, prominent among the ruling Bianchi in Florence.^ We find Dante, in 1301, prominent among the ruling Bianchi in Florence.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ We find Dante, in 1301, prominent among the ruling Bianchi in Florence .
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ "In May 1301, the Bianchi party, of Pistoia, with the assistance and favor of the Bianchi who ruled Florence, drove out the Neri party from the former place, destroying their houses, Palaces and farms."
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

.On 19 June, in the Council of the Hundred, he returned his famous answer, Nihil fiat, to the proposed grant of soldiers to the pope, which the Cardinal of Acquasparta had demanded by letter.^ On 19 June, in the Council of the Hundred, he returned his famous answer, Nihil fiat, to the proposed grant of soldiers to the pope, which the Cardinal of Acquasparta had demanded by letter.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ On 19 June, in the Council of the Hundred, he returned his famous answer, Nihil fiat , to the proposed grant of soldiers to the pope , which the Cardinal of Acquasparta had demanded by letter.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ On 19 June, in the Council of the Hundred, he returned his famous answer, Nihil fiat , to the proposed grant of soldiers to the pope, which the Cardinal of Acquasparta had demanded by letter.
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

.After 28 September he is lost sight of.^ After 28 September he is lost sight of.
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

.He is said to have been sent on a mission to the pope at the beginning of October, but this is disputed.^ He is said to have been sent on a mission to the pope at the beginning of October, but this is disputed.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In October 1301 Dante was sent in a delegation from the commune to Pope Boniface VIII, whose policies he openly opposed as constituting a threat to Florentine independence.
  • Dante (Alighieri) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.public.asu.edu [Source type: Original source]

.On 1 November Charles of Valois entered Florence with his troops, and restored the Neri to power.^ On 1 November Charles of Valois entered Florence with his troops, and restored the Neri to power.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In 1300 the Guelphs who have started to bitterly fight among themselves are divided in two factions the "Bianchi" (White) and "Neri" (Black) Guelphs and in 1302 the Black Guelphs seize power in Florence.
  • Divine Comedy Starlight Tower Florida St Pete Beach 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.starlight-tower.com [Source type: General]

^ At the same time (November 1, 1301) Charles de Valois was entering Florence with Black Guelfs, who in the next six days destroyed everything and killed most of their enemies.
  • Dante Alighieri 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.mlahanas.de [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.readeasily.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Aligheieri - Biography 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.themiddleages.net [Source type: Original source]

.Corso Donati and his friends returned in triumph, and were fully revenged on their opponents.^ Corso Donati and his friends returned in triumph, and were fully revenged on their opponents.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Corso Donati, who had been banished a second time, returned in force and summoned the Blacks to arms.
  • Dante Alighieri. Italian poet (1265-1321) 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

.Dante was one of the first victims.^ Dante was one of the first victims.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Virgil explains to Dante that sins of violence are categorized according to the victim: other people (one's neighbor) oneself, or God ( Inf.
  • Dante's Inferno Game | Explore The Inferno 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.dantesinferno.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ The first (the one by which Dante finds her) is the Lethe, which empties the minds of those who drink of it of all cancelled sins.

.On a trumped-up charge of hostility to the Church and corrupt practices, he was sentenced (27 January, 1302), together with four others, to a heavy fine and perpetual exclusion from office.^ On a trumped-up charge of hostility to the Church and corrupt practices, he was sentenced (27 January, 1302), together with four others, to a heavy fine and perpetual exclusion from office.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante was charged of financial corruption in January 1302 and some months later he was condemned to death by burning.
  • Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.websophia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ MedXXII:1 Ciampolo and the demons provide a moment of burlesque concealing a serious thrust at the Florentines who exiled Dante partly on trumped-up corruption charges.
  • Meditations on the Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri - IndexIJKLM. 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC tkline.pgcc.net [Source type: Original source]

.On 10 March, together with fifteen others, he was further condemned, as contumacious, to be burned to death, should he ever come into the power of the Commune.^ Again failing to appear, on March 10, 1302, Dante and 14 other Whites were condemned to be burned to death.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

^ On March 10 Dante and fourteen others were condemned to be burned alive if they should come into the power of the republic.
  • Dante Alighieri. Italian poet (1265-1321) 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ On 10 March, together with fifteen others, he was further condemned, as contumacious, to be burned to death, should he ever come into the power of the Commune.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

.At the beginning of April the whole of the White faction were driven out of Florence.^ At the beginning of April the whole of the White faction were driven out of Florence.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The spirit of faction had again broken out in Florence.
  • Dante Alighieri. Italian poet (1265-1321) 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The said Dante," he says, "was one of the chief magistrates of our city, and was of the White party, and a Guelf withal ; and on that account, without any other fault, with the said White party he was driven out and banished from Florence."
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

.A few years before his exile Dante had married Gemma di Manetto Donati, a distant kinswoman of Corso, by whom he had four children.^ It was written in 1320, the year before he died.
  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A295355 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.bbc.co.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ He marries Gemma de' Donati, with whom he lives unhappily.
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In about 1285, Dante married Gemma di Manetto Donati, the daughter of a powerful Guelfo.
  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A295355 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.bbc.co.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.He never saw his wife again; but his sons, Pietro and Jacopo, and one of his daughters, Beatrice, joined him in later years.^ He never saw his wife again; but his sons, Pietro and Jacopo, and one of his daughters, Beatrice, joined him in later years.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Years later Dante met Beatrice again.
  • Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.kirjasto.sci.fi [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]
  • Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.websophia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ These children were tAvo sons, Pietro and Jacopo, and two daughters, Antonia and Beatrice.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

.At first, he made common cause with his fellow-exiles at Siena, Arezzo, and Forli, in attempting to win his way back to Florence with the aid of Ghibelline arms.^ At first, he made common cause with his fellow-exiles at Siena, Arezzo, and Forli, in attempting to win his way back to Florence with the aid of Ghibelline arms.
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ At first, he made common cause with his fellow-exiles at Siena , Arezzo , and Forli, in attempting to win his way back to Florence with the aid of Ghibelline arms.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ At first, he made common cause with his fellow-exiles at Siena, Arezzo , and Forli, in attempting to win his way back to Florence with the aid of Ghibelline arms.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

.Dante's name occurs in a document of 8 June, 1302 among the exiled Bianchi who at San Godenzo in the Apennines were forming an alliance with the Ubaldini to make war upon the Florentine Republic; but, in a similar agreement signed at Bologna on 18 June, 1303, he no longer appears among them.^ Dante's name occurs in a document of 8 June, 1302 among the exiled Bianchi who at San Godenzo in the Apennines were forming an alliance with the Ubaldini to make war upon the Florentine Republic; but, in a similar agreement signed at Bologna on 18 June, 1303, he no longer appears among them.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Immediately, they banish all the White Guelphs including Dante who coincidentally was away on a political mission in Rome so he was exiled and sentenced to death in absentia.
  • Divine Comedy Starlight Tower Florida St Pete Beach 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.starlight-tower.com [Source type: General]

^ Dante was born in 1265 and he tells us he was born under the sign of Gemini, placing his birthday in June.

.Between these two dates he had made his resolution to form a party by himself (Par., xvii, 61-68), and had sought refuge in the hospitality of Bartolommeo della Scala, the lord of Verona, where he first saw Can Grande della Scala, Bartolommeo's younger brother, then a boy of fourteen years, who became the hero of his later days.^ Alberto della Scala, lord of Verona, who had made his natural son abbot of San Zeno.
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Can Grande della Scala is born, March 9.
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Who are these two.
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

.Dante now withdrew from all active participation in politics.^ Dante now withdrew from all active participation in politics.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante now began to take an active part I politics.
  • Dante Alighieri. Italian poet (1265-1321) 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Immediately, they banish all the White Guelphs including Dante who coincidentally was away on a political mission in Rome so he was exiled and sentenced to death in absentia.
  • Divine Comedy Starlight Tower Florida St Pete Beach 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.starlight-tower.com [Source type: General]

.In one of his odes written at this time, the "Canzone of the Three Ladies" (Canz.^ In one of his odes written at this time, the "Canzone of the Three Ladies" (Canz.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The lights circle them three times like stars round the pole then rest like ladies from a dance.
  • Meditations On The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC ebooks.gutenberg.us [Source type: Original source]
  • Meditations on the Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri - Paradiso 8to14. 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC tkline.pgcc.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Ham emerged last, running at full tilt just one step ahead of a snarling, foaming bear about three times his size.
  • The Divine Comedy | Udargo.com 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.udargo.com [Source type: Original source]

xx), he finds himself visited in his banishment by .Justice and her spiritual children, outcasts even as he, and declares that, since such are his companions in misfortune, he counts his exile an honour.^ Justice and her spiritual children, outcasts even as he, and declares that, since such are his companions in misfortune, he counts his exile an honour.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Justice and her spiritual children, outcasts even as he, and declares that, since such are his companions in misfortune, he counts his exile an honour .
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ So during the long years of the exile he came to terms with his misfortune hence the birth of this literary masterpiece "Divine Comedy" where he found his spiritual catharsis.
  • Divine Comedy Starlight Tower Florida St Pete Beach 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.starlight-tower.com [Source type: General]

.His literary work at this epoch centres round his rime, or lyrical poems, more particularly round a series of fourteen canzoni or odes, amatory in form, but partly allegorical and didactic in meaning, a splendid group of poems which connect the "Vita Nuova" with the "Divina Commedia". Early in 1304 he seems to have gone to Bologna.^ Main Early life and the Vita nuova .
  • Dante (Italian poet) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.britannica.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ His literary work at this epoch centres round his rime, or lyrical poems, more particularly round a series of fourteen canzoni or odes, amatory in form, but partly allegorical and didactic in meaning, a splendid group of poems which connect the "Vita Nuova" with the "Divina Commedia".
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Early in 1304 he seems to have gone to Bologna.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

.Here he began, but left unfinished, a Latin treatise, "De Vulgari Eloquentia", in which he attempts to discover the ideal Italian language, the noblest form of the vernacular, and then to show how it should be employed in the composition of lyrical poetry.^ Here he began, but left unfinished, a Latin treatise, "De Vulgari Eloquentia", in which he attempts to discover the ideal Italian language, the noblest form of the vernacular, and then to show how it should be employed in the composition of lyrical poetry.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ (The unfinished De vulgari eloquentia [c.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

^ He wrote DE VULGARI ELOQUENTIA (1304-07), a treatise on his native language, written in Latin.

.Even in its unfinished state it is a most illuminating book to all who wish to understand the metrical form of the Italian canzone.^ Even in its unfinished state it is a most illuminating book to all who wish to understand the metrical form of the Italian canzone.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ While the book is written in verse form it is not in rhyme for all those who do not speak Italian.
  • Amazon.ca: Customer Reviews: The Divine Comedy: Inferno; Purgatorio; Paradiso (in one volume) 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.amazon.ca [Source type: General]

^ Even in its unfinished state it is a most illuminating book to all who wish to understand the metrical form of the Italian canzone .
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

.On 10 March, 1306, the Florentine exiles were expelled from Bologna.^ On 10 March, 1306, the Florentine exiles were expelled from Bologna.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ March 10: permanently banned from Florentine territory under pain of death by fire.
  • Dante's Inferno Game | Explore The Inferno 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.dantesinferno.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.In August we find Dante at Padua, and some weeks later in Lunigiana, where, on 6 October he acted as the representative of the Marquess Franceschino Malaspina in making peace between his family and the Bishop of Luni.^ In August we find Dante at Padua , and some weeks later in Lunigiana, where, on 6 October he acted as the representative of the Marquess Franceschino Malaspina in making peace between his family and the Bishop of Luni.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In August we find Dante at Padua, and some weeks later in Lunigiana, where, on 6 October he acted as the representative of the Marquess Franceschino Malaspina in making peace between his family and the Bishop of Luni.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante traveled throughout Italy, for a time a guest of Malaspina, and there is some evidence that he also visited Paris and England.

.About this time (1306-08) he began the "Convivio", or "Banquet" in Italian prose, a kind of popularization of Scholastic philosophy in the form of a commentary upon his fourteen odes already mentioned.^ About this time (1306-08) he began the "Convivio", or "Banquet" in Italian prose, a kind of popularization of Scholastic philosophy in the form of a commentary upon his fourteen odes already mentioned.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Between 1304 and 1306, Dante began two works concerned with the formal qualities of poetry, De vulgari eloquentia and Il convivio, neither of which he completed.
  • The Divine Comedy Volume I: Inferno 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.greatbooks.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante Alighieri was born in Florence, Italy, about 1265 A.D. He began writing “The Divine Comedy” about 1306 and completed it about 1321, the year in which he died.
  • Who the heck was Homer?» Naples Daily News 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.naplesnews.com [Source type: General]
  • Who the heck was Homer?» Marco Eagle 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.marconews.com [Source type: General]

.Only four of the fifteen projected treatises were actually written, an introduction and three commentaries.^ Only four of the fifteen projected treatises were actually written, an introduction and three commentaries.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The fourth treatise of the Convivio seems to have been written later than the first three, and it is markedly different in orientation.
  • Dante Alighieri (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ It consists, in the form in which it has once down to us, of an introduction and three treatises, each forming an elaborate, commentary in a long canzone.
  • Dante Alighieri. Italian poet (1265-1321) 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

In allegorical fashion they tell us how Dante became the lover of Philosophy, that mystical lady whose soul is love and whose body is wisdom, she "whose true abode is in the most secret place of the Divine Mind".
.All certain traces of Dante are now lost for some years.^ All certain traces of Dante are now lost for some years.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante continued to harbor the desire to return to his beloved Florence, and it was only in 1313, after having lost all reasonable hope, that he headed towards the court of Verona.
  • Seminar on Dante Alighieri in Casentino 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.parlital.it [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Dante merely whitewashed the Aeneid to remove all traces of pagan culture, feeling he had Virgil's own approval to make revisions.
  • The Divine Comedy/Dantes Inferno 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.satanspace.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.He is said to have gone to Paris some time between 1307 and 1309, but this is open to question.^ He is said to have gone to Paris some time between 1307 and 1309, but this is open to question.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante traveled throughout Italy, for a time a guest of Malaspina, and there is some evidence that he also visited Paris and England.

^ Dante’s exile was spent partly in Verona and partly in other northern Italian cities; he reached Paris between 1307 and 1309.
  • DANTE ALIGHIERI 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.history.com [Source type: General]

.In November, 1308, Henry of Luxemburg was elected emperor as Henry VII. In him Dante saw a possible healer of the wounds of Italy, a renovator of Christendom, a new "Lamb of God" (the expression is the poet's) who would take away the sins of the world.^ The Emperor Henry VII, who died in 1313.
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

^ In November, 1308, Henry of Luxemburg was elected emperor as Henry VII. In him Dante saw a possible healer of the wounds of Italy , a renovator of Christendom , a new "Lamb of God" (the expression is the poet's) who would take away the sins of the world.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Who would want to argue with him?
  • Theology Today - Vol 48, No.4 - January 1992 - ARTICLE - Divine Incongruity: Comedy and Tragedy in a Post-Holocaust World 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC theologytoday.ptsem.edu [Source type: Original source]

.This drew him back again into the tempestuous sea of politics and the life of action.^ This drew him back again into the tempestuous sea of politics and the life of action.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ It is said to have been originally written to appease the Dei Medici Family and allow him entrance back into Florence.
  • Dominique Liana Russo as Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.nyu.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ But yester-morn I left it: then once more Into that vale returning, him I met; And by this path homeward he leads me back."
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante - Full Text Free Book (Part 2/11) 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

.It was probably in 1309, in anticipation of the emperor's coming to Italy, that Dante wrote his famous work on the monarchy, "De Monarchiâ", in three books.^ The "Dante" that wrote the James Dean book was b.
  • Dante Alighieri | LibraryThing 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.librarything.com [Source type: General]

^ It was probably in 1309, in anticipation of the emperor's coming to Italy , that Dante wrote his famous work on the monarchy, "De Monarchiâ", in three books.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ This is the last published work that Dante ever wrote.
  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A295355 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.bbc.co.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Fearing lest he "should one day be convicted of the charge of the buried talent", and desirous of "keeping vigil for the good of the world", he proceeds successively to show that such a single supreme temporal monarchy as the empire is necessary for the well-being of the world, that the Roman people acquired universal sovereign sway by Divine right, and that the authority of the emperor is not dependent upon the pope, but descends upon him directly from the fountain of universal authority which is God.^ God gives temporal power to the Emperor, while spiritual power is reserved for the Pope.
  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A295355 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.bbc.co.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Supreme love is therefore desire for the supreme Good that is for God.
  • Meditations on the Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri - IndexIJKLM. 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC tkline.pgcc.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Empire, depends im- mediately upon God.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

.Man is ordained for two ends: blessedness of this life, which consists in the exercise of his natural powers and is figured in the terrestrial paradise; blessedness of life eternal, which consists in the fruition of the Divine aspect in the celestial paradise to which man's natural powers cannot ascend without the aid of the Divine light.^ Man is ordained for two ends: blessedness of this life, which consists in the exercise of his natural powers and is figured in the terrestrial paradise; blessedness of life eternal, which consists in the fruition of the Divine aspect in the celestial paradise to which man's natural powers cannot ascend without the aid of the Divine light.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Man is ordained for two ends: blessedness of this life, which consists in the exercise of his natural powers and is figured in the terrestrial paradise ; blessedness of life eternal, which consists in the fruition of the Divine aspect in the celestial paradise to which man's natural powers cannot ascend without the aid of the Divine light.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante, The Divine Comedy, Revised Edition ( buy new ) The Divine Comedy: Inferno, Purgatory, and Paradise + maps & images ( buy new ) Divine Comedy Trilogy + Life of Dante on Audo CD ( new .
  • Dante's Inferno Test - Impurity, Sin, and Damnation 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.4degreez.com [Source type: Original source]

.To these two ends man must come by diverse means: "For to the first we attain by the teachings of philosophy, following them by acting in accordance with the moral and intellectual virtues.^ To these two ends man must come by diverse means: "For to the first we attain by the teachings of philosophy , following them by acting in accordance with the moral and intellectual virtues.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ To these two ends man must come by diverse means: "For to the first we attain by the teachings of philosophy, following them by acting in accordance with the moral and intellectual virtues.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Virgil, representing human philosophy acting in accordance with the moral and intellectual virtues, guides Dante by the light of natural reason from the dark wood of alienation from God (where the beasts of lust pride, and avarice drive man back from ascending the Mountain of the Lord), through hell and purgatory to the earthly paradise, the state of temporal felicity, when spiritual liberty has been regained by the purgatorial pains.
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

.To the second by spiritual teachings, which transcend human reason, as we follow them by acting according to the theological virtues."^ To the second by spiritual teachings, which transcend human reason , as we follow them by acting according to the theological virtues."
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ To the second by spiritual teachings, which transcend human reason, as we follow them by acting according to the theological virtues."
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ His model for the Empire is of a temporal power separated from spiritual matters, with Roman laws and virtues, central control based in Rome, and an authority in accord with active virtue.
  • Meditations On The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC ebooks.gutenberg.us [Source type: Original source]
  • Meditations on the Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri - Inferno 29to34. 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC tkline.pgcc.net [Source type: Original source]

.But, although these ends and means are made plain to us by human reason and by revelation, men in their cupidity would reject them, were not they restrained by bit and rein.^ These are they That lust made sinful.
  • S.FW - The Inferno 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.sfw.org [Source type: Original source]

^ But, although these ends and means are made plain to us by human reason and by revelation, men in their cupidity would reject them, were not they restrained by bit and rein.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The transfer between human reason and divine revelation takes place in Purgatory, a place where penitents who await the final journey to Paradise continually reaffirm their faith and atone for the sins they committed on earth.
  • Gale - Free Resources - Poet's Corner - Biographies - Dante (Alighieri) 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.gale.cengage.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

."Wherefore man had need of a twofold directive power according to his twofold end, to wit, the Supreme Pontiff, to lead the human race in accordance with things revealed, to eternal life; and the Emperor, to direct the human race to temporal felicity in accordance with the teachings of philosophy."^ "Wherefore man had need of a twofold directive power according to his twofold end, to wit, the Supreme Pontiff, to lead the human race in accordance with things revealed, to eternal life; and the Emperor, to direct the human race to temporal felicity in accordance with the teachings of philosophy."
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ "Wherefore man had need of a twofold directive power according to his twofold end, to wit, the Supreme Pontiff , to lead the human race in accordance with things revealed, to eternal life; and the Emperor, to direct the human race to temporal felicity in accordance with the teachings of philosophy ."
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Wherefore man had need of a twofold directive power according to his twofold end, to wit, the Supreme Pontiff, to lead the human race in accordance with things revealed, to eternal life; and the Emperor, to direct the human race to temporal felicity in accordance with the teachings of philosophy.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

It is therefore the special duty of the emperor to establish freedom and peace "on this threshing floor of mortality". Mr. Wicksteed (whose translation is quoted) aptly notes that in the, "De Monarchiâ" "we first find in its full maturity the general conception of the nature of man, of government, and of human destiny, which was afterwards transfigured, without being transformed, into the framework of the Sacred Poem".
.The emperor arrived in Italy in September, 1310. Dante had already announced this new sunrise for the nations in an enthusiastic letter to the princes and peoples of Italy (Epist.^ Dante had already announced this new sunrise for the nations in an enthusiastic letter to the princes and peoples of Italy (Epist.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The emperor arrived in Italy in September, 1310.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In 1310 Henry VII of Luxembourg, King of the Romans (Germany), was invading Italy; Dante saw in him the chance of revenge, so he wrote to him (and to other Italian princes) several public letters violently inciting them to destroy the Black Guelfs.
  • Dante Alighieri 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.mlahanas.de [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.readeasily.com [Source type: Original source]

v). .He paid homage to Henry in Milan, early in 1311, and was much gratified by his reception.^ He paid homage to Henry in Milan, early in 1311, and was much gratified by his reception.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ He paid homage to Henry in Milan , early in 1311, and was much gratified by his reception.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

.He then passed into the Casentino, probably on some imperial mission.^ He then passed into the Casentino, probably on some imperial mission.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ He certainly spent some time with Count Guido Salvatico in the Casentino near the sources of the Arno, probably in the castle of Porciano, and with Uguccione in the castle of Faggiuola in the mountains of Urbino.
  • Dante Alighieri. Italian poet (1265-1321) 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ You’d probably pass out if you read what she was into.” .
  • The University of Edward Masen Chapter 18, a Twilight fanfic - FanFiction.Net 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.fanfiction.net [Source type: Original source]

.Thence, on 31 March, he wrote to the Florentine Government (Epist.^ Thence, on 31 March, he wrote to the Florentine Government (Epist.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In March 1266, Ghibelline ambassadors from Florence, including Dante's relative, Buonaccorso Elisei, outlined to the Pope a restoration of the former Florentine Guelph government.
  • brunetto 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.florin.ms [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ In March, 1266, Ghibelline ambassadors from Florence to the Curia, among them Buonaccorso Elisei, Dante's blood relative, outlined to the Pope a restoration of the former Florentine government.
  • Holloway: Chancery and Comedy: Brunetto Latini and Dante Alighieri 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.brown.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

vi), ."the most wicked Florentines within", denouncing them in unmeasured language for their opposition to the emperor, and, on 16 April, to Henry (Epist.^ Florentines within", denouncing them in unmeasured language for their opposition to the emperor, and, on 16 April, to Henry (Epist.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Some hold that Dante wrote it before his exile from Florence ; but it was most pi-obably written, as Boccaccio says it was, about the time when the Emperor Henry vii.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante Alighieri, a Florentine and undeservedly an exile, to the most iniquitous Florentines within the city," he uses no measured terms, and does not hesitate to threaten the Florentines with the direct vengeance of the Emperor.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

vii), rebuking him for his delay, urging him to proceed at once against the rebellious city, ."this dire plague which is named Florence". By a decree of 2 September (the reform of Baldo d'Aguglione), Dante is included in the list of those who are permanently excepted from all amnesty and grace by the commune of Florence.^ By a decree of 2 September (the reform of Baldo d'Aguglione), Dante is included in the list of those who are permanently excepted from all amnesty and grace by the commune of Florence.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante also found time to be a soldier, and in 1289 fought in the battle of Campaldino (June 11), with Florentine knights against Arezzo, then in 1294 he was among those knights who escorted Carlo Martello d'Anjou (son of Charles of Anjou) while he was in Florence.
  • Dante Alighieri 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.mlahanas.de [Source type: Original source]

^ MedXXIX:2 Dante adds Siena to the list of Italian cities from which he has drawn examples to people the Inferno, including Florence itself, Pistoia (Canto XXV), Bologna (Canto XXIII) , and Lucca (Canto XXI).
  • Meditations on the Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri - IndexCD. 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC poetryintranslation.com [Source type: Original source]

.In the spring of 1312 he seems to have gone with the other exiles to join the emperor at Pisa, and it was there that Petrarch, then a child in his eighth year, saw his great predecessor for the only time.^ In the spring of 1312 he seems to have gone with the other exiles to join the emperor at Pisa, and it was there that Petrarch, then a child in his eighth year, saw his great predecessor for the only time.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In the spring of 1312 he seems to have gone with the other exiles to join the emperor at Pisa , and it was there that Petrarch , then a child in his eighth year, saw his great predecessor for the only time.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante is widely known as a literary great, and many call him the second greatest writer of all time, second only to William Shakespeare.

.Reverence for his fatherland, Leonardo Bruni tells us, kept Dante from accompanying the imperial army that vainly besieged Florence in September and October; nor do we know what became of him in the disintegration of his party on the emperor's death in the following August, 1313. A vague tradition makes him take refuge in the convent of Santa Croce di Fonte Avellana near Gubbio.^ A vague tradition makes him take refuge in the convent of Santa Croce di Fonte Avellana near Gubbio.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante makes us believe in his narration ...
  • Free Dante Inferno Essays 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.123helpme.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ A vague tradition makes him take refuge in the convent of Santa Croce di Fonte Avellana near Gubbio .
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

.It was possibly from thence that, after the death of Clement V, in 1314, he wrote his noble letter to the Italian cardinals (Epist.^ It was possibly from thence that, after the death of Clement V, in 1314, he wrote his noble letter to the Italian cardinals (Epist.
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  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ It was possibly from thence that, after the death of Clement V , in 1314, he wrote his noble letter to the Italian cardinals (Epist.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ After the death of Pope Clement V. he addressed a letter, dated July 14, 1314, to the cardinals in conclave, urging them to elect an Italian Pope.
  • Dante Alighieri. Italian poet (1265-1321) 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

viii), crying aloud with the voice of .Jeremias, urging them to restore the papacy to Rome.^ Jeremias, urging them to restore the papacy to Rome.
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  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Jeremias, urging them to restore the papacy to Rome .
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

.A little later, Dante was at Lucca under the protection of Uguccione della Faggiuola, a Ghibelline soldier who had temporarily made himself lord of that city.^ A little later, Dante was at Lucca under the protection of Uguccione della Faggiuola, a Ghibelline soldier who had temporarily made himself lord of that city.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Faggiuola, Uguccione della 120 n.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Between these two dates he had made his resolution to form a party by himself (Par., xvii, 61-68), and had sought refuge in the hospitality of Bartolommeo della Scala, the lord of Verona , where he first saw Can Grande della Scala, Bartolommeo's younger brother, then a boy of fourteen years, who became the hero of his later days.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

.Probably in consequence of his association with Uguccione the Florentines renewed the sentence of death against the poet (6 Nov.^ Probably in consequence of his association with Uguccione the Florentines renewed the sentence of death against the poet (6 Nov.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
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  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ When Uguccione finally defeated Florence, Dante's death sentence was converted into confinement, at the sole condition that he go to Florence to swear that he would never enter the town again.

^ The city of Florence has issued a pardon for the poet, 700 years after it sentenced him to death for his political beliefs.
  • The Annotico Report: Dante Alighieri Pardoned 700 Years Later - - What a Relief !!!! 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.annoticoreport.com [Source type: General]

1315), his two sons being included in the condemnation. .In 1316 several decrees of amnesty were passed, and (although Dante was undoubtedly excluded under a provision of 2 June) some attempt was made to get it extended to him.^ In 1316 several decrees of amnesty were passed, and (although Dante was undoubtedly excluded under a provision of 2 June) some attempt was made to get it extended to him.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
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  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ By a decree of 2 September (the reform of Baldo d'Aguglione), Dante is included in the list of those who are permanently excepted from all amnesty and grace by the commune of Florence.
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  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante was born in 1265 and he tells us he was born under the sign of Gemini, placing his birthday in June.

.The poet's answer was his famous letter to an unnamed Florentine friend (Epist.^ The poet's answer was his famous letter to an unnamed Florentine friend (Epist.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
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  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ On 19 June, in the Council of the Hundred, he returned his famous answer, Nihil fiat, to the proposed grant of soldiers to the pope, which the Cardinal of Acquasparta had demanded by letter.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ CHARACTERISTICS OF DANTE companion of princes,^ the friend of poets, and himself already the most famous writer of love verses in Italy.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

ix), absolutely refusing to return to his country under shameful conditions. .He now went again to Verona, where he found his ideal of knightly manhood realized in Can Grande della Scala, who was ruling a large portion of Eastern Lombardy as imperial vicar, and in whom he doubtless saw a possible future deliverer of Italy.^ He now went again to Verona , where he found his ideal of knightly manhood realized in Can Grande della Scala, who was ruling a large portion of Eastern Lombardy as imperial vicar, and in whom he doubtless saw a possible future deliverer of Italy .
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Can Grande della Scala is born, March 9.
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

^ He is thought to allude to Can Grande della Scala.
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

.It is a plausible theory, dating from the fifteenth century, that identifies Can Grande with the "Veltro", or greyhound, the hero whose advent is prophesied at the beginning of the "Inferno", who is to effectuate the imperial ideals of the "De Monarchiâ", and succeed where Henry of Luxemburg had failed.^ It is a plausible theory, dating from the fifteenth century, that identifies Can Grande with the "Veltro", or greyhound, the hero whose advent is prophesied at the beginning of the "Inferno", who is to effectuate the imperial ideals of the "De Monarchiâ", and succeed where Henry of Luxemburg had failed.
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ "A monk of the abbey of Gemblours who was in high repute at the end of the eleventh, and beginning of the twelfth century."
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Bertrand de Born, Vicomte de Hautefort, near Perigueux in Guienne, who incited John to rebel against his father, Henry II. of England.
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

.In 1317 (according to the more probable chronology) Dante settled at Ravenna, at the invitation of Guido Novello da Polenta.^ In 1317 (according to the more probable chronology ) Dante settled at Ravenna , at the invitation of Guido Novello da Polenta.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ He takes refuge at Ravenna with Guido Novello da Polenta.
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In Ravenna as guest of Guido Novello da Polenta .
  • Dante's Inferno Game | Explore The Inferno 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.dantesinferno.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.Here he completed the "Divina Commedia". From Ravenna he wrote the striking letter to Can Grande (Epist.^ Here he completed the "Divina Commedia".
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ From Ravenna he wrote the striking letter to Can Grande (Epist.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The first complete translation of the "Divina Commedia" into English, the work of an Irishman, Henry Boyd, was published in 1802 (that of the "Inferno" having been issued in 1785).
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x), dedicating the ."Paradiso" to him, commenting upon its first canto, and explaining the intention and allegorical meaning of the whole poem.^ "Paradiso" to him, commenting upon its first canto, and explaining the intention and allegorical meaning of the whole poem.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
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  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ According to literary analysts, the first line of the poem, combined with lines 112-114 of Canto XXI of Inferno reveal that the journey begins on Good Friday, 1300.
  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A295355 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.bbc.co.uk [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Dante and Beatrice gaze upon the highest Heaven; from Gustave Doré 's illustrations to the Divine Comedy Paradiso Canto 31 .
  • The Divine Comedy at AllExperts 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: Original source]

.A letter in verse (1319) from Giovanni del Virgilio, a lecturer in Latin at the University of Bologna, remonstrating with him for treating such lofty themes in the vernacular, inviting him to come and receive the laurel crown in that City, led Dante to compose his first "Eclogue" a delightful poem in pastoral Latin hexameters, full of human kindness and gentle humour.^ A letter in verse (1319) from Giovanni del Virgilio, a lecturer in Latin at the University of Bologna, remonstrating with him for treating such lofty themes in the vernacular, inviting him to come and receive the laurel crown in that City, led Dante to compose his first "Eclogue" a delightful poem in pastoral Latin hexameters, full of human kindness and gentle humour.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante studies at the universities of Bologna and Padua.
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.scribd.com [Source type: Original source]
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Exchanges Latin eclogues with Giovanni del Virgilio .
  • Dante's Inferno Game | Explore The Inferno 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.dantesinferno.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.In it Dante expresses his unalterable resolution to receive the laurel from Florence alone, and proposes to win his correspondent to an appreciation of vernacular poetry by the gift of ten cantos of the "Paradiso". A second "Eclogue" was sent to Giovanni after Dante's death, but it is doubtful whether it was really composed by the poet.^ A second "Eclogue" was sent to Giovanni after Dante's death, but it is doubtful whether it was really composed by the poet.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
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  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In it Dante expresses his unalterable resolution to receive the laurel from Florence alone, and proposes to win his correspondent to an appreciation of vernacular poetry by the gift of ten cantos of the "Paradiso".
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  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Boniface quickly sent away the other representatives and asked Dante alone to remain in Rome.

.This correspondence shows that in 1319 the "Inferno" and "Purgatorio" were already generally known while the "Paradiso" was still unfinished.^ This correspondence shows that in 1319 the "Inferno" and "Purgatorio" were already generally known while the "Paradiso" was still unfinished.
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^ MedLI:3 Inferno is lost relationship, Purgatorio a re-orientation of the individual towards true relationship, Paradiso an expression of the community of spirits.
  • Meditations on the Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri - IndexCD. 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC poetryintranslation.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The Purgatorio was completed before 1318, as we learn from the Latin poem addressed to Johannes de Virgilio, which speaks of the Inferno and Purgatorio as completed, the Paradiso as yet to be written.
  • Dante Alighieri. Italian poet (1265-1321) 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

.This was now sent in installments to Can Grande, as completed, between 1319 and 1321. If the "Quaestio de Aqua et Terra" is authentic, Dante was at Verona on 20 January, 1320, where he delivered a discourse on the relative position of earth and water on the surface of the globe; but, although the authenticity of this treatise has recently found strenuous defenders, it must still be regarded as doubtful.^ This was now sent in installments to Can Grande, as completed, between 1319 and 1321.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
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  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Alain Campbell White, 1903) / Quaestio de Aqua et Terra (ed.

^ If the "Quaestio de Aqua et Terra" is authentic, Dante was at Verona on 20 January, 1320, where he delivered a discourse on the relative position of earth and water on the surface of the globe; but, although the authenticity of this treatise has recently found strenuous defenders, it must still be regarded as doubtful.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

.In July, 1321, Dante went on an embassy from Guido da Polenta to Venice.^ In July, 1321, Dante went on an embassy from Guido da Polenta to Venice .
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In July, 1321, Dante went on an embassy from Guido da Polenta to Venice.
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^ In 1317 (according to the more probable chronology ) Dante settled at Ravenna , at the invitation of Guido Novello da Polenta.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

.Two months later he died, at Ravenna, on the feast of the Exaltation of the Cross, and was buried in the church of San Francesco in that city.^ Two months later he died, at Ravenna, on the feast of the Exaltation of the Cross, and was buried in the church of San Francesco in that city.
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  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante was buried in the Church of San Pier Maggiore (later called San Francesco).

^ Two months later he died, at Ravenna , on the feast of the Exaltation of the Cross, and was buried in the church of San Francesco in that city.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

.The whole of the "Divina Commedia" had been published, with the exception of the last thirteen cantos of the "Paradiso", which were afterwards discovered by his son Jacopo and forwarded by him to Can Grande.^ The whole of the "Divina Commedia" had been published, with the exception of the last thirteen cantos of the "Paradiso", which were afterwards discovered by his son Jacopo and forwarded by him to Can Grande.
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  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The first complete translation of the "Divina Commedia" into English, the work of an Irishman, Henry Boyd, was published in 1802 (that of the "Inferno" having been issued in 1785).
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  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Jacopo and Piero were sons of Dante, and each of them being DANTE'S WORKS 209 rhymers, they were induced by the persuasions of their friends to endeavour to complete, as far as they were able, their father's work, in order that it should not remain imperfect ; when to Jacopo, who was more eager about it than his brother, there appeared a wonderful vision, which not only induced him to abandon such presumptu- ous folly, but showed him where the thirteen cantos were which were wanting to the Divina Commedia, and which they had not been able to find.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

.The "Divina Commedia" is an allegory of human life, in the form of a vision of the world beyond the grave, written avowedly with the object of converting a corrupt society to righteousness: "to remove those living in this life from the state of misery, and lead them to the state of felicity". It is composed of a hundred cantos, written in the measure known as terza rima, with its normally hendecasyllabic lines and closely linked rhymes, which Dante so modified from the popular poetry of his day that it may be regarded as his own invention.^ The "Divina Commedia" is an allegory of human life , in the form of a vision of the world beyond the grave, written avowedly with the object of converting a corrupt society to righteousness: "to remove those living in this life from the state of misery, and lead them to the state of felicity ".
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ His vision is improved beyond that of human comprehension.
  • The Divine Comedy at AllExperts 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC en.allexperts.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Divine Comedy - Monstropedia - the largest encyclopedia about monsters 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.monstropedia.org [Source type: General]

^ The "Divina Commedia" is an allegory of human life, in the form of a vision of the world beyond the grave, written avowedly with the object of converting a corrupt society to righteousness: "to remove those living in this life from the state of misery, and lead them to the state of felicity".
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

.He is relating, nearly twenty years after the event, a vision which was granted to him (for his own salvation when leading a sinful life) during the year of jubilee, 1300, in which for seven days (beginning on the morning of Good Friday) he passed through hell, purgatory, and paradise, spoke with the souls in each realm, and heard what the Providence of God had in store for himself and to world.^ Seven P's, to denote the seven sins (Peccata) of which he was to be cleansed in his passage through purgatory.
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Virgil leads Dante through Hell.
  • The Divine Comedy and Kabala, Dante Alighieri - Rosicrucian Archive 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.crcsite.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Hell and Purgatory and finally to Paradise.
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.The framework of the poem presents the dual scheme of the "De Monarchiâ" transfigured.^ The framework of the poem presents the dual scheme of the "De Monarchia" transfigured.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The framework of the poem presents the dual scheme of the "De Monarchiâ" transfigured.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
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^ Wicksteed (whose translation is quoted) aptly notes that in the, "De Monarchiâ" "we first find in its full maturity the general conception of the nature of man, of government, and of human destiny, which was afterwards transfigured, without being transformed, into the framework of the Sacred Poem".
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

.Virgil, representing human philosophy acting in accordance with the moral and intellectual virtues, guides Dante by the light of natural reason from the dark wood of alienation from God (where the beasts of lust pride, and avarice drive man back from ascending the Mountain of the Lord), through hell and purgatory to the earthly paradise, the state of temporal felicity, when spiritual liberty has been regained by the purgatorial pains.^ Virgil, representing human philosophy acting in accordance with the moral and intellectual virtues, guides Dante by the light of natural reason from the dark wood of alienation from God (where the beasts of lust pride, and avarice drive man back from ascending the Mountain of the Lord), through hell and purgatory to the earthly paradise, the state of temporal felicity, when spiritual liberty has been regained by the purgatorial pains.
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante is spiritually asleep and lost in a dark wood.
  • The Divine Comedy and Kabala, Dante Alighieri - Rosicrucian Archive 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.crcsite.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante emphasizes the fallibility of human wisdom and reason through Virgil’s eventual confusion and inability to guide him through Paradise.
  • Who the heck was Homer?» Naples Daily News 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.naplesnews.com [Source type: General]

.Beatrice, representing Divine philosophy illuminated by revelation, leads him thence, up through the nine moving heavens of intellectual preparation, into the true paradise, the spaceless and timeless empyrean, in which the blessedness of eternal life is found in the fruition of the sight of God.^ Beatrice, representing Divine philosophy illuminated by revelation, leads him thence, up through the nine moving heavens of intellectual preparation, into the true paradise, the spaceless and timeless empyrean, in which the blessedness of eternal life is found in the fruition of the sight of God.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ They were for him his 'Divine Appearances' of Beatrice.
  • Amazon.ca: Customer Reviews: The Divine Comedy: Inferno; Purgatorio; Paradiso (in one volume) 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.amazon.ca [Source type: General]

^ MedLXVII:2 Dante prepares for his entry into Paradise, with Beatrice as his guide.
  • Meditations on the Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri - IndexAB. 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC poetryintranslation.com [Source type: Original source]

There her place is taken by St. Bernard, type of the loving contemplation in which the eternal life of the soul consists, who commends him to the Blessed Virgin, at whose intercession he obtains a foretaste of the Beatific Vision, the poem closing with all powers of knowing and loving fulfilled and consumed in the union of the understanding with the Divine Essence, the will made one with the Divine Will, "the Love that moves the sun and the other stars".
.The sacred poem, the last book of the Middle Ages, sums up the knowledge and intellectual attainment of the centuries that passed between the fall of the Roman Empire and the beginning of the Renaissance; it gives a complete picture of Catholicism in the thirteenth century in Italy.^ His book was treasured up for centuries, only falling out of favour at the Age of Reason.
  • Augustine, Boethius, Dionysius: Julian's Mystical Philosophy 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.umilta.net [Source type: Original source]

^ The sacred poem, the last book of the Middle Ages, sums up the knowledge and intellectual attainment of the centuries that passed between the fall of the Roman Empire and the beginning of the Renaissance ; it gives a complete picture of Catholicism in the thirteenth century in Italy.
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The sacred poem, the last book of the Middle Ages, sums up the knowledge and intellectual attainment of the centuries that passed between the fall of the Roman Empire and the beginning of the Renaissance; it gives a complete picture of Catholicism in the thirteenth century in Italy.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

.In the "Inferno", Dante's style is chiefly influenced by Virgil, and, in a lesser degree, by Lucan.^ Inferno, Canto XXXIV. Dante and Virgil before Lucifer; Dante and Virgil (rest damaged).
  • Bodleian Library: Western manuscripts to c.1500: MS. Holkham misc. 48: Inferno 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.bodley.ox.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

^ Inferno, Canto IV and V. Dante and Virgil observe the virtuous pagans on the meadow; Dante and Virgil before Minos (damaged).
  • Bodleian Library: Western manuscripts to c.1500: MS. Holkham misc. 48: Inferno 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.bodley.ox.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

^ Inferno, Canto IX. Virgil shields Dante's eyes; the three Furies stand in front of the tower of Dis.
  • Bodleian Library: Western manuscripts to c.1500: MS. Holkham misc. 48: Inferno 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.bodley.ox.ac.uk [Source type: Reference]

The heir in poetry of the great achievement of St. Albertus Magnus and St. Thomas Aquinas in christianizing Aristotle, his ethical scheme and metaphysics are mainly Aristotelean while his machinery is still that of popular medieval tradition. .It is doubtful whether he had direct acquaintance with any other account of a visit to the spirit world, save that in the sixth book of the "Æneid". But over all this vast field his dramatic sense played at will, picturing human nature in its essentials, laying bare the secrets of the heart with a hand as sure as that of Shakespeare.^ But over all this vast field his dramatic sense played at will, picturing human nature in its essentials, laying bare the secrets of the heart with a hand as sure as that of Shakespeare .
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ But over all this vast field his dramatic sense played at will, picturing human nature in its essentials, laying bare the secrets of the heart with a hand as sure as that of Shakespeare.
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ It is doubtful whether he had direct acquaintance with any other account of a visit to the spirit world, save that in the sixth book of the "Æneid".
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

.Himself the victim of persecution and injustice, burning with zeal for the reformation and renovation of the world, Dante's impartiality is, in the main, sublime.^ Himself the victim of persecution and injustice, burning with zeal for the reformation and renovation of the world, Dante's impartiality is, in the main, sublime.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Himself the victim of persecution and injustice , burning with zeal for the reformation and renovation of the world, Dante's impartiality is, in the main, sublime.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Divided into three sections, the Inferno or Hell, Purgatory, and Paradise, The Divine Comedy explores the theme of life after death with Dante himself as the main character.
  • The Divine Comedy | Park West Gallery Dali 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC dali.parkwestgallery.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.He is the man (to adopt his own phrase) to whom Truth appeals from her immutable throne, as such, he relentlessly condemns the "dear and kind paternal image" of Brunetto Latini to hell, though from him he had learned "how man makes himself eternal" while he places Constantine, to whose donation he ascribes the corruption of the Church and the ruin of the world in paradise.^ He is the man (to adopt his own phrase) to whom Truth appeals from her immutable throne, as such, he relentlessly condemns the "dear and kind paternal image" of Brunetto Latini to hell, though from him he had learned "how man makes himself eternal " while he places Constantine, to whose donation he ascribes the corruption of the Church and the ruin of the world in paradise.
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Such is the guilt condemns him to this pain.
  • The Divine Comedy: Hell / by Dante Alighieri; translated by H. F. Cary; illustrated by Gustave Doré 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante - Full Text Free Book (Part 2/11) 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

^ He is the man (to adopt his own phrase) to whom Truth appeals from her immutable throne, as such, he relentlessly condemns the "dear and kind paternal image" of Brunetto Latini to hell , though from him he had learned "how man makes himself eternal" while he places Constantine, to whose donation he ascribes the corruption of the Church and the ruin of the world in paradise .
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

.The pity and terror of certain episodes in the "Inferno" — the fruitless magnanimity of Farinata degli Uberti, the fatal love of Francesca da Rimini, the fall of Guido da Montefeltro, the doom of Count Ugolino — reach the utmost heights of tragedy.^ XXVII. Guido da Montefeltro.
  • Divine Comedy Inferno The Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Uberti, Farinata degli.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The private astrologer to Guido da Montefeltro .
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri - IndexAB. 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC poetryintranslation.com [Source type: Original source]

.The "Purgatorio", perhaps the most artistically perfect of the three canticles, owes less to the beauty of the separate episodes.^ The "Purgatorio", perhaps the most artistically perfect of the three canticles, owes less to the beauty of the separate episodes.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Purgatorio, the most lyrical and human of the three, also has the most poets in it; Paradiso, the most heavily theological, has the most beautiful and ecstatic mystic passages, in which Dante tries to describe what he confesses he is unable to convey.

^ One of the leaders on the opposite side, the Ghibelline Buonconte da Montefeltro, forms the subject of one of the most beautiful episodes in the Divina Commedia.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

.Dante's conception of purgatory as a lofty mountain, rising out of the ocean in the southern hemisphere, and leading up to the Garden of Eden, the necessary preparation for winning back the earthly paradise, and with it all the prerogatives lost by man at the fall of Adam, seems peculiar to him; nor do we find elsewhere the purifying process carried on beneath the sun and stars, with the beauty of transfigured nature only eclipsed by the splendour of the angelic custodians of the seven terraces.^ Find all posts by Nowhere Man .
  • The Divine Comedy - Catholic Answers Forums 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC forums.catholic.com [Source type: General]

^ We shall find him in the Paradise, Canto X. v.
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante's conception of purgatory as a lofty mountain, rising out of the ocean in the southern hemisphere, and leading up to the Garden of Eden, the necessary preparation for winning back the earthly paradise, and with it all the prerogatives lost by man at the fall of Adam, seems peculiar to him; nor do we find elsewhere the purifying process carried on beneath the sun and stars, with the beauty of transfigured nature only eclipsed by the splendour of the angelic custodians of the seven terraces.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

.The meeting with Beatrice on the banks of Lethe, with Dante's personal confession of an unworthy past, completes the story of the "Vita Nuova" after the bitter experiences and disillusions of a lifetime.^ Dante writes his Vita Nuova.
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

^ The meeting with Beatrice on the banks of Lethe, with Dante's personal confession of an unworthy past, completes the story of the "Vita Nuova" after the bitter experiences and disillusions of a lifetime.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Other works include De vulgari eloquentia ("On the Eloquence of Vernacular"), on vernacular literature, and the La Vita Nuova ("The New Life"), the story of his love for Beatrice Portinari, who also served as the ultimate symbol of salvation in the Comedy.

.The essence of Dante's philosophy is that all virtues and all vices proceed from love.^ The essence of Dante's philosophy is that all virtues and all vices proceed from love.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The essence of Dante's philosophy is that all virtues and all vices proceed from love .
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ MedXCIII:1 Dante asserts his continuing love for Beatrice (and Divine philosophy).
  • Meditations on the Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri - IndexIJKLM. 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC tkline.pgcc.net [Source type: Original source]

.The "Purgatorio" shows how love is to be set in order, the "Paradiso" shows how it is rendered perfect in successive stages of illumination, until it attains to union with the Divine Love.^ The "Purgatorio" shows how love is to be set in order, the "Paradiso" shows how it is rendered perfect in successive stages of illumination, until it attains to union with the Divine Love.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ This correspondence shows that in 1319 the "Inferno" and "Purgatorio" were already generally known while the "Paradiso" was still unfinished.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The Love abused and betrayed in Inferno, is strengthened and healed in Purgatorio, and fully revealed in Paradiso.
  • Meditations on the Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri - IndexIJKLM. 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC tkline.pgcc.net [Source type: Original source]

The whole structure and spiritual arrangement of Dante's paradise, in which groups of saints make a temporary appearance in the lower spheres in token of the "many mansions", is closely dependent upon the teachings of the Pseudo-Dionysius and St. Bernard concerning the different offices of the nine orders of angels. It is doubtful whether he knew the "Celestial Hierarchy" of Dionysius at first hand, in the translation of Scotus Erigena; but St. Bernard's "De Consideratione" certainly influenced him profoundly. .Dante's debt to the Fathers and Doctors of the Church has not yet been investigated with the fullness of research that has been devoted to elucidating his knowledge of the classical writers.^ Dante's debt to the Fathers and Doctors of the Church has not yet been investigated with the fullness of research that has been devoted to elucidating his knowledge of the classical writers.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Yet Dante has little to say about his more immediate family.There is no mention of his father or mother, brother or sister in The Divine Comedy.
  • History of Art:Dante - The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante was a great writer and this classic will stay on my bookshelf forever.
  • The Divine Comedy - Literature Network Forums 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.online-literature.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

His theology is mainly that of St. Thomas Aquinas, though he occasionally (as when treating of primal matter and of the nature of the celestial intelligences) departs from the teaching of the Angelical Doctor. On particular points, the influence of St. Gregory, St. Isidore, St. Anselm, and St. Bonaventure may be traced; that of Boethius is marked and deep throughout. His mysticism is professedly based upon St. Augustine, St. Bernard, and Richard of St. Victor, while in many places it curiously anticipates that of St. John of the Cross. Mr. Wicksteed speaks of "many instances in which Dante gives a spiritual turn to the physical speculations of the Greeks". Even in the "Paradiso" the authority of Aristotle is, next to that of the Scriptures, supreme; and it is noteworthy that, when questioned by St. John upon charity, Dante appeals first of all to the Stagirite (in the "Metaphysics") as showing us the cause for loving God for Himself and above all things (Par., xxvi, 37-39). .The harmonious fusion of the loftiest mysticism with direct transcripts from nature and the homely circumstance of daily life, all handled with poetic passion and the most consummate art, gives the "Divina Commedia" its unique character.^ The harmonious fusion of the loftiest mysticism with direct transcripts from nature and the homely circumstance of daily life, all handled with poetic passion and the most consummate art, gives the "Divina Commedia" its unique character.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Our daily manna give to us this day, Without which he that through this desert wild Toils most to speed goes backward on his way.
  • Biography: Dante Alighieri, poet (15 Sept 1321) 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC elvis.rowan.edu [Source type: Original source]
  • Biography: Dante Alighieri, poet (15 Sept 1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC elvis.rowan.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ I have never in my life read a book overflowing with such incredible love and passion as "La Vita Nuova"; it's probably the most romantic book I have ever seen.
  • Geometry.Net - Celebrities Books: Alighieri Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

.The closing canto is the crown of the whole work sense and music are wedded in perfect harmony; the most profound mystery of faith is there set forth in supreme song with a vivid clearness and illuminating precision that can never be surpassed.^ The closing canto is the crown of the whole work sense and music are wedded in perfect harmony; the most profound mystery of faith is there set forth in supreme song with a vivid clearness and illuminating precision that can never be surpassed.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The closing canto is the crown of the whole work sense and music are wedded in perfect harmony ; the most profound mystery of faith is there set forth in supreme song with a vivid clearness and illuminating precision that can never be surpassed.
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ It cannot be said that Dante rejects Virgil; rather he sadly found that nowhere in Virgil's work, that is, in his consciousness, was there any sense of personal liberation from the enthrallment of history and its processes.
  • History of Art:Dante - The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

.Dante's vehement denunciation of the ecclesiastical corruption of his times, and his condemnation of most of the contemporary popes (including the canonized Celestine V) to hell have led to some questioning as to the poet's attitude towards the Church.^ Dante's vehement denunciation of the ecclesiastical corruption of his times, and his condemnation of most of the contemporary popes (including the canonized Celestine V ) to hell have led to some questioning as to the poet's attitude towards the Church.
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante's attitude toward the major political players of his time.
  • The Divine Comedy - Literature Network Forums 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.online-literature.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Dante's vehement denunciation of the ecclesiastical corruption of his times, and his condemnation of most of the contemporary popes (including the canonized Celestine V ) to hell have led to some questioning as to the poet's attitude towards the Church .
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

.Even in the fourteenth century attempts were made to find heresy in the "Divina Commedia", and the "De Monarchiâ" was burned at Bologna by order of a papal legate.^ Even in the fourteenth century attempts were made to find heresy in the "Divina Commedia", and the "De Monarchiâ" was burned at Bologna by order of a papal legate .
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Even in the fourteenth century attempts were made to find heresy in the "Divina Commedia", and the "De Monarchia" was burned at Bologna by order of a papal legate.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Even in the fourteenth century attempts were made to find heresy in the "Divina Commedia", and the "De Monarchiâ" was burned at Bologna by order of a papal legate.
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

.In more recent times Dante has been hailed as a precursor of the Reformation.^ In more recent times Dante has been hailed as a precursor of the Reformation.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In more recent times Dante has been hailed as a precursor of the Reformation .
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Some time after 1348, Giovanni Boccaccio wrote the first formal life of Dante, the "Trattatello in laude di Dante", the authority of which once much derided, has been largely rehabilitated by more recent research.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

His theological position as an orthodox Catholic has been amply and repeatedly vindicated, recently and most notably by Dr. Moore, who declares that "there is no trace in his writings of doubt or dissatisfaction respecting any part of the teaching of the Church in matters of doctrine authoritatively laid down". A strenuous opponent of the political aims of the popes of his own day, the beautiful episodes of Casella and Manfred in the "Purgatorio", no less than the closing chapter of the "De Monarchiâ" itself, bear witness to Dante's reverence for the spiritual power of the papacy, which he accepts as of Divine origin. .Not the least striking testimony to his orthodoxy is the part played by the Blessed Virgin in the sacred poem from the beginning to the end.^ Not the least striking testimony to his orthodoxy is the part played by the Blessed Virgin in the sacred poem from the beginning to the end.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
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  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Poem 3 Philosophia: The only stable order in things is that which connects the beginning to the end and keeps itself on a steady course.
  • Augustine, Boethius, Dionysius: Julian's Mystical Philosophy 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.umilta.net [Source type: Original source]

^ The power of the sacred poem in popularizing Catholic theology and Catholic philosophy, and rendering it acceptable, or at least intelligible to non-Catholics, is at the present day almost incalculable.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
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  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

It is, as it were, the working out in inspired poetry of the sentence of Richard of St. Victor: "Through Mary not only is the light of grace given to man on earth but even the vision of God vouchsafed to souls in Heaven."
.Our earliest account of the life and works of Dante is contained in a chapter in the "Croniche Fiorentine" of Giovanni Villani (d.^ Our earliest account of the life and works of Dante is contained in a chapter in the "Croniche Fiorentine" of Giovanni Villani (d.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
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  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Giovanni Boccaccio wrote a life of the poet and then in 1373–74 delivered the first public lectures on The Divine Comedy (which means that Dante was the first of the moderns whose work found its place with the ancient classics in a university course).
  • History of Art:Dante - The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

^ But it also contains Dante's learned comments on his own work and these too are in the vernacular, instead of the Latin that was almost universally used.

.1348), who speaks of the poet as "our neighbour". There are six commentaries extant on the "Divina Commedia", in whole or in part, composed within ten years of the poet's death.^ Later it was dubbed the Divina Commedia , not by Dante, but by his readers years after his death.
  • Dominique Liana Russo as Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.nyu.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ There are six commentaries extant on the "Divina Commedia", in whole or in part, composed within ten years of the poet's death.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
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  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ According to our Poet's system, there are ten heavens; the seven planets, the eighth spheres containing the fixed stars, the primum mobile, and the empyrean.
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

.Three of these by Graziolo de' Bambaglioli, then chancellor of the commune of Bologna; an unidentified Florentine known as Selmi's Anonimo, and Fra Guido da Pisa, a Carmelite extend to the "Inferno" alone; those by Jacopo Alighieri, the poet's second son, Jacopo della Lana of Bologna, and the author of the "Ottimo Commento" deal with the entire poem.^ Three of these by Graziolo de' Bambaglioli, then chancellor of the commune of Bologna; an unidentified Florentine known as Selmi's Anonimo, and Fra Guido da Pisa, a Carmelite extend to the "Inferno" alone; those by Jacopo Alighieri, the poet's second son, Jacopo della Lana of Bologna, and the author of the "Ottimo Commento" deal with the entire poem.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Graziolo appears as the first defender of Dante's orthodoxy (then fiercely assailed in Bologna); the author of the "Ottimo" (plausibly identified with a Florentine notary and poet, Andrea Lancia) professes to have actually spoken with Dante, and gives us various interesting details concerning his life.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Some which have been preserved under the name of Dante belong to Dante de Maiano, a poet of a harsher style; others which bear the name of Aldighiero are referable to Dante’s sons Jacopo or Pietro, or to his grandsons; others may be ascribed to Dante’s contemporaries and predecessors Cino de Pistoia and others.
  • Dante Alighieri. Italian poet (1265-1321) 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

.Graziolo appears as the first defender of Dante's orthodoxy (then fiercely assailed in Bologna); the author of the "Ottimo" (plausibly identified with a Florentine notary and poet, Andrea Lancia) professes to have actually spoken with Dante, and gives us various interesting details concerning his life.^ Graziolo appears as the first defender of Dante's orthodoxy (then fiercely assailed in Bologna); the author of the "Ottimo" (plausibly identified with a Florentine notary and poet, Andrea Lancia) professes to have actually spoken with Dante, and gives us various interesting details concerning his life.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The book is dedicated to the Florentine poet, Guido Cavalcanti, whom Dante calls "the first of my friends", and ends with the promise of writing concerning Beatrice "what has never before been written of any woman ".
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The book is dedicated to the Florentine poet, Guido Cavalcanti, whom Dante calls "the first of my friends", and ends with the promise of writing concerning Beatrice "what has never before been written of any woman".
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

.About 1340 Dante's elder son, Pietro Alighieri, set himself to elucidate his father's work; two versions of his Latin commentary have been preserved, the later containing additions which (if really his) are of considerable importance.^ About 1340 Dante's elder son, Pietro Alighieri, set himself to elucidate his father's work; two versions of his Latin commentary have been preserved, the later containing additions which (if really his) are of considerable importance.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Father and son I set at mutual war.
  • The Divine Comedy: Hell / by Dante Alighieri; translated by H. F. Cary; illustrated by Gustave Doré 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC ebooks.adelaide.edu.au [Source type: Original source]
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante - Full Text Free Book (Part 2/11) 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.fullbooks.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante Alighieri - a poet who also wrote in Latin, a deeply religious dreamer, and a politician ousted from his beloved Florence by the opposition - was forced to roam the palaces of northern Italy for the last two decades of his life, when he wrote the work.
  • "The Divine Comedy," read nonstop. | Philadelphia Inquirer | 01/17/2010 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.philly.com [Source type: News]

.Some time after 1348, Giovanni Boccaccio wrote the first formal life of Dante, the "Trattatello in laude di Dante", the authority of which once much derided, has been largely rehabilitated by more recent research.^ In more recent times Dante has been hailed as a precursor of the Reformation.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In more recent times Dante has been hailed as a precursor of the Reformation .
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ It occurs in some of the oldest manuscripts of the poem, and in Boccaccio's Life of Dante.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

.His commentary on the "Inferno" is the substance of lectures delivered at Florence in 1373. A few years later came the commentaries of Benvenuto da Imola and Francesco Buti, which were originally delivered as lectures at Bologna and Pisa respectively.^ His commentary on the "Inferno" is the substance of lectures delivered at Florence in 1373.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ A few years later came the commentaries of Benvenuto da Imola and Francesco Buti, which were originally delivered as lectures at Bologna and Pisa respectively.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Benvenuto da Imola (aVc.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

.Benvenuto's is a living book, full of humour and actuality as well as learning.^ Benvenuto's is a living book, full of humour and actuality as well as learning.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Knowing full well they could spend the actual eternity in a staring contest, I decided it was up to me to break the impasse.
  • Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC shetiger.com [Source type: Original source]

.The little "Life" by Leonardo Bruni (d.^ The little "Life" by Leonardo Bruni (d.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

.1444), the famous chancellor of the Florentine Republic, which supplements Boccaccio's work with fresh information and quotes letters of the poet other than those which are now known and the slighter notice by Filippo Villani (c.^ The poet's answer was his famous letter to an unnamed Florentine friend (Epist.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Florentine Republic, which supplements Boccaccio's work with fresh information and quotes letters of the poet other than those which are now known and the slighter notice by Filippo Villani (c.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Both Villani and Boccaccio include the De DANTE'S WORKS 221 Monm'cMa in their lists of Dante's works.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

.1404), who is the first commentator who refers in explicit terms to the "Letter to Can Grande", bring the first age of Dante interpretation to an appropriate close.^ "Letter to Can Grande", bring the first age of Dante interpretation to an appropriate close.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ How do Dante's comments about interpretation (249-50) compare to those of Thomas Aquinas (243-46)?
  • Teachers' Resource Web Maintained by Alfred J. Drake, Ph.D. 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.ajdrake.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The first (the one by which Dante finds her) is the Lethe, which empties the minds of those who drink of it of all cancelled sins.

.The title of father of modern Dante scholarship unquestionably belongs to Karl Witte (1800-83), whose labours set students of the nineteenth century on the right path both in interpretation and in textual research.^ The title of father of modern Dante scholarship unquestionably belongs to Karl Witte (1800-83), whose labours set students of the nineteenth century on the right path both in interpretation and in textual research.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ A pivotal figure for European culture, Dante began to be widely recognized in the United States only in the nineteenth century.
  • Project MUSE - Subject Browse 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC muse.jhu.edu [Source type: Academic]

^ The place of honour among Dante societies belongs unquestionably and in every sense to the "Societa Dantesca Italiana", an admirably conducted association with its headquarters at Florence, which welcomes foreign students among its members, and is distinguished for its high and liberal scholarship.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

.More recently, mainly through the influence of G.A. Scartazzini (d.^ More recently, mainly through the influence of G.A. Scartazzini (d.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ A more copious bibliography of Dante literature is subjoined, taken mainly from Scartazzini’s German work.
  • Dante Alighieri. Italian poet (1265-1321) 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

.1901), a wave of excessive scepticism swept over the field, by which the traditional events of Dante's life were regarded as little better than fables and the majority of his letters and even some of his minor works were declared to be spurious.^ It is in Aries, at the equinox, but Virgil explains that if it were in Gemini, the Twins, its (June) arc being higher in the sky would take it even nearer the north (Orse= the Great and Little Bears, Ursa Major and Ursa Minor).
  • Dante: The Divine Comedy - Notes to the Purgatorio 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC tkline.pgcc.net [Source type: Original source]

^ Works Dante's reputation as the outstanding figure of Italian letters rests mainly on the Divine Comedy, a long vernacular poem in 100 cantos (more than 14,000 lines) composed during his exile.
  • Dante Alighieri Facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.encyclopedia.com [Source type: Academic]

^ That justification involves the expression of some theory as to the translation of Dante’s world-poem, itself implying a criticism, whether expressed or not, of competitors already in the field.
  • Online Library of Liberty - Dante's Divine Comedy 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC oll.libertyfund.org [Source type: Original source]

.This has now happily abated.^ This has now happily abated.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

.The most pressing needs of Dante scholarship today are more textual study of the "Divina Commedia", a closer and more thorough acquaintance with every aspect of the minor works and a fuller investigation of Dante's position with regard to the great philosophies of the Middle Ages; such as will justify or restate the pregnant opening of the epitaph that Giovanni del Virgilio composed for his tomb: Theologus Dantes, nullius dogmatis expers quod foveat claro philosophia sinu ("Dante the theologian, skilled in every branch of knowledge that philosophy may cherish in her illustrious bosom").^ Aristotles philosophy supreme in the Middle Ages.
  • The Divine Comedy of Dante Alighieri - IndexAB. 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC poetryintranslation.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante may be said to have concentrated in himself the spirit of the middle age.
  • Dante Alighieri. Italian poet (1265-1321) 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The most pressing needs of Dante scholarship today are more textual study of the "Divina Commedia", a closer and more thorough acquaintance with every aspect of the minor works and a fuller investigation of Dante's position with regard to the great philosophies of the Middle Ages; such as will justify or restate the pregnant opening of the epitaph that Giovanni del Virgilio composed for his tomb: Theologus Dantes, nullius dogmatis expers quod foveat claro philosophia sinu ("Dante the theologian, skilled in every branch of knowledge that philosophy may cherish in her illustrious bosom").
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

.Dante may be said to have made Italian poetry, and to have stamped the mark of his lofty and commanding personality upon all modern literature.^ Dante may be said to have made Italian poetry, and to have stamped the mark of his lofty and commanding personality upon all modern literature.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ His influence upon English literature begins with the poetry of Chaucer , who hails him worthily in the "Monkes Tale", and refers his readers to him as "the grete poete of Itaille that highte Dant".
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Through his masterpiece Dante established Tuscan as the literary language of Italy, surpassed all previous Italian writers, and gave rise to a vast literature.
  • Dante Alighieri Facts, information, pictures | Encyclopedia.com articles about Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.encyclopedia.com [Source type: Academic]

.It can even be claimed that his works have had a direct share in shaping the aspirations and destinies of his native country.^ It can even be claimed that his works have had a direct share in shaping the aspirations and destinies of his native country.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

.His influence upon English literature begins with the poetry of Chaucer, who hails him worthily in the "Monkes Tale", and refers his readers to him as "the grete poete of Itaille that highte Dant". Eclipsed for a while in Tudor times by the greater popularity of Petrarch, he was afterwards ignored or contemned from the Restoration until the end of the eighteenth century.^ His influence upon English literature begins with the poetry of Chaucer , who hails him worthily in the "Monkes Tale", and refers his readers to him as "the grete poete of Itaille that highte Dant".
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Eclipsed for a while in Tudor times by the greater popularity of Petrarch, he was afterwards ignored or contemned from the Restoration until the end of the eighteenth century.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Eclipsed for a while in Tudor times by the greater popularity of Petrarch , he was afterwards ignored or contemned from the Restoration until the end of the eighteenth century.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

.The first complete translation of the "Divina Commedia" into English, the work of an Irishman, Henry Boyd, was published in 1802 (that of the "Inferno" having been issued in 1785).^ Here he completed the "Divina Commedia".
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The first complete translation of the "Divina Commedia" into English, the work of an Irishman, Henry Boyd, was published in 1802 (that of the "Inferno" having been issued in 1785).
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ This work was first published in the Italian translation of Trissino at Vicenza in 1529.
  • Dante Alighieri. Italian poet (1265-1321) 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

.Dante came again into his heritage among us with the great flood of noble poetry that the beginning of the nineteenth century witnessed.^ Poetry even for us monoglots Let's begin with Dante.
  • Geometry.Net - Celebrities Books: Alighieri Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.geometry.net [Source type: General]

^ Dante came again into his heritage among us with the great flood of noble poetry that the beginning of the nineteenth century witnessed.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ A pivotal figure for European culture, Dante began to be widely recognized in the United States only in the nineteenth century.
  • Project MUSE - Subject Browse 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC muse.jhu.edu [Source type: Academic]

.The eloquent tributes rendered to him by Shelley (in "Epipsychidion", the "Triumph of Life", and "A Defence of Poetry") and by Byron (especially in the "Prophecy of Dante") as after them by Browning and Tennyson, need not be repeated here.^ The eloquent tributes rendered to him by Shelley (in "Epipsychidion", the "Triumph of Life", and "A Defence of Poetry") and by Byron (especially in the "Prophecy of Dante") as after them by Browning and Tennyson, need not be repeated here.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Then by the scalp behind I seized upon him, nbsp; nbsp; And said: "It must needs be thou name thyself, nbsp; nbsp; Or not a hair remain upon thee here."
  • Divine Comedy Inferno The Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC www.slideshare.net [Source type: Original source]

^ 'Shelley has finished the life of Tasso & reads Dante - read Pamela' .
  • Reading Experience Database Browse Author Writings Alighieri Dante 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.open.ac.uk [Source type: General]

.Through Dante Gabriel Rossetti and the Pre-Raphaelites, he has been a fruitful influence in art no less than in letters.^ Through Dante Gabriel Rossetti and the Pre-Raphaelites, he has been a fruitful influence in art no less than in letters.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ (There is a splendid and most self-referential Dante Gabriel Rossetti painting of that scene in Oxford's Ashmolean Museum.
  • Brunetto Latino and Dante Alighieri. The Vita Nuova: Paradigms of Pilgrimage 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.florin.ms [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ To Charles my words apply No less than to his brother in the song; Which Pouille and Provence now with grief confess.
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

.In the interpretation and criticism of Dante, English-speaking scholars at present stand second only to the Italians.^ In the interpretation and criticism of Dante, English-speaking scholars at present stand second only to the Italians .
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In the interpretation and criticism of Dante, English-speaking scholars at present stand second only to the Italians.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante is widely known as a literary great, and many call him the second greatest writer of all time, second only to William Shakespeare.

.Never, perhaps, has Dante's fame stood so high as at the present day, when he is universally recognized as ranking with Homer, Æschylus, Sophocles, and Shakespeare, among the few supreme poets of the world.^ Never, perhaps, has Dante's fame stood so high as at the present day, when he is universally recognized as ranking with Homer , Aeschylus , Sophocles , and Shakespeare , among the few supreme poets of the world.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ This is the supreme edifice of the universe in which all the world is enclosed and beyond which there is nothing; it is not itself in space but was formed solely in the Primal Mind, which the Greeks call Protonoe.
  • Dante Alighieri (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC plato.stanford.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante’s reputation has passed through many vicissitudes, and much trouble has been spent by critics in comparing him with other poets of established fame.
  • Dante Alighieri. Italian poet (1265-1321) 15 September 2009 7:28 UTC www.1902encyclopedia.com [Source type: Original source]

.It has been well observed that his inspiration resembles that of the Hebrew prophet more than that of the poet as ordinarily understood.^ It has been well observed that his inspiration resembles that of the Hebrew prophet more than that of the poet as ordinarily understood.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ (Those codes spoke more prophetically than he knew.
  • Brunetto Latino and Dante Alighieri. The Vita Nuova: Paradigms of Pilgrimage 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.florin.ms [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Ultimately, the illustrations were not well received by the Italians, as it was deemed inappropriate for a Spanish painter (rather than an Italian painter) to have illustrated the masterpiece of Italy’s greatest poet.
  • The Divine Comedy | Park West Gallery Dali 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC dali.parkwestgallery.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.His influence moreover, is by no means confined to mere literature.^ His influence moreover, is by no means confined to mere literature.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

.A distinguished Unitarian divine has pointed out that the modern cult of Dante is "a sign of enlarging and deepening spiritual perception as well as literary appreciation", and that it is one of the chief indications of "the renewed hold which the later Middle Ages have gained upon modern Europe" (Wicksteed, "The Religion of Time and of Eternity").^ This is one of the best book of Middle ages: the Divine comedy by Dante Alighieri.
  • Dante's Divine comedy - Civilization Fanatics' Forums 19 January 2010 9:54 UTC forums.civfanatics.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ A distinguished Unitarian divine has pointed out that the modern cult of Dante is "a sign of enlarging and deepening spiritual perception as well as literary appreciation", and that it is one of the chief indications of "the renewed hold which the later Middle Ages have gained upon modern Europe" (Wicksteed, "The Religion of Time and of Eternity").
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ A distinguished Unitarian divine has pointed out that the modern cult of Dante is "a sign of enlarging and deepening spiritual perception as well as literary appreciation", and that it is one of the chief indications of "the renewed hold which the later Middle Ages have gained upon modern Europe " (Wicksteed, "The Religion of Time and of Eternity ").
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

.The poet's own son Pietro Alighieri, declared that, if the Faith were extinguished, Dante would restore it, and it is noteworthy today that many serious non-Catholic students of life and letters owe a totally different conception of the Catholic religion to the study of the "Divina Commedia". The power of the sacred poem in popularizing Catholic theology and Catholic philosophy, and rendering it acceptable, or at least intelligible to non-Catholics, is at the present day almost incalculable.^ The power of the sacred poem in popularizing Catholic theology and Catholic philosophy, and rendering it acceptable, or at least intelligible to non-Catholics, is at the present day almost incalculable.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante's work is also an eminent catholic poem.
  • Amazon.ca: Customer Reviews: The Divine Comedy: Inferno; Purgatorio; Paradiso (in one volume) 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.amazon.ca [Source type: General]

^ The poet's own son Pietro Alighieri, declared that, if the Faith were extinguished, Dante would restore it, and it is noteworthy today that many serious non-Catholic students of life and letters owe a totally different conception of the Catholic religion to the study of the "Divina Commedia".
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

.The place of honour among Dante societies belongs unquestionably and in every sense to the "Societa Dantesca Italiana", an admirably conducted association with its headquarters at Florence, which welcomes foreign students among its members, and is distinguished for its high and liberal scholarship.^ The place of honour among Dante societies belongs unquestionably and in every sense to the "Societa Dantesca Italiana", an admirably conducted association with its headquarters at Florence , which welcomes foreign students among its members, and is distinguished for its high and liberal scholarship.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The small but distinguished "Oxford Dante Society" does work of a high order of scholarship.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The place of honour among Dante societies belongs unquestionably and in every sense to the "Societa Dantesca Italiana", an admirably conducted association with its headquarters at Florence, which welcomes foreign students among its members, and is distinguished for its high and liberal scholarship.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

.In addition to courses of lectures delivered under its auspices in various Italian cities, it publishes a quarterly "Bulletino", a survey of contemporary Dante literature, and has begun a series of critical editions of the minor works.^ In addition to courses of lectures delivered under its auspices in various Italian cities, it publishes a quarterly "Bulletino", a survey of contemporary Dante literature, and has begun a series of critical editions of the minor works.
  • CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.newadvent.org [Source type: Original source]
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In Dante's time it was expected for serious works of literature to be written in Latin.
  • Amazon.ca: Customer Reviews: The Divine Comedy: Inferno; Purgatorio; Paradiso (in one volume) 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.amazon.ca [Source type: General]

^ Giovanni Boccaccio wrote a life of the poet and then in 1373–74 delivered the first public lectures on The Divine Comedy (which means that Dante was the first of the moderns whose work found its place with the ancient classics in a university course).
  • History of Art:Dante - The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

.Of these latter, volumes dealing with the "De Vulgari Eloquentia" and the "Vita Nuova", by Pio Rajna and Michele Barbi respectively, have already appeared, and may be truly said to mark an epoch in the critical and textual study of Dante's Latin and Italian writings alike.^ Vicenza ; translation of Dante's De Vulgari Eloquentia printed at, 224.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

^ (The unfinished De vulgari eloquentia [c.
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante writes his Vita Nuova.
  • The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC worldlibrary.net [Source type: Original source]

.The association known as the "Dante Alighieri", on the other hand, is essentially a national and political society, and is only indirectly concerned with the poet whose name it bears.^ Among these names was that of Dante Alighieri, whose exclusion was '^E^islola vii.
  • Full text of "Dante Alighieri" 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.archive.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Dante Italian poet in full Dante Alighieri .
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The association known as the "Dante Alighieri", on the other hand, is essentially a national and political society, and is only indirectly concerned with the poet whose name it bears.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

.Of Dante societies other than Italian, the "American Dante Society" of Cambridge, Massachusetts, stands first in importance.^ Of Dante societies other than Italian, the "American Dante Society" of Cambridge, Massachusetts, stands first in importance.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The "Dante Society of London" is noteworthy for its large number of members, and publishes its sessional lectures in volume form; but its aims appear to be social rather than scholarly.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ At first Dante is afraid, faint hearted, and so also is Beatrice timid and terrified, rather than either being brave.
  • Brunetto Latino and Dante Alighieri. The Vita Nuova: Paradigms of Pilgrimage 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.florin.ms [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

.The small but distinguished "Oxford Dante Society" does work of a high order of scholarship.^ The small but distinguished "Oxford Dante Society" does work of a high order of scholarship.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The place of honour among Dante societies belongs unquestionably and in every sense to the "Societa Dantesca Italiana", an admirably conducted association with its headquarters at Florence, which welcomes foreign students among its members, and is distinguished for its high and liberal scholarship.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The Vita nuova, which Dante called his libello, or small book, is a remarkable work.
  • History of Art:Dante - The Divine Comedy 2 February 2010 10:010 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]
  • History of Art: Masterpieces of World Literature-Dante Alighieri 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.all-art.org [Source type: Original source]

.The "Dante Society of London" is noteworthy for its large number of members, and publishes its sessional lectures in volume form; but its aims appear to be social rather than scholarly.^ The "Dante Society of London " is noteworthy for its large number of members, and publishes its sessional lectures in volume form; but its aims appear to be social rather than scholarly.
  • Dante Alighieri - Catholic Encyclopedia - Catholic Online 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.catholic.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The "Dante Society of London" is noteworthy for its large number of members, and publishes its sessional lectures in volume form; but its aims appear to be social rather than scholarly.
  • Logos (est. 1995): Dante Alighieri (1265-1321) 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC russellmcneil.blogspot.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In making the connection between Beatrice and Virgil, Dante is expressing his idea that courtly love is tied to reason rather than to passion.
  • The University of Edward Masen Chapter 18, a Twilight fanfic - FanFiction.Net 19 January 2010 18:018 UTC www.fanfiction.net [Source type: Original source]

Portions of this entry are taken from The Catholic Encyclopedia, 1907.
Facts about Dante AlighieriRDF feed

Simple English

[[File:|thumb|230px|right|Dante Alighieri, painted by Giotto in the chapel of the Bargello palace in Florence. This oldest portrait of Dante was painted during his lifetime before his exile from his native city.]]

File:Dante alighieri, Palazzo dei
A portrait of Dante, from a fresco in Palazzo dei Giudici, Florence.

Dante Alighieri, or simply Dante (May 14/June 13 1265 - September 14, 1321), was an Italian poet from Florence. His central work, the Commedia (Divine Comedy), is considered the greatest literary work composed in the Italian language and a masterpiece of world literature. In Italian he is known as "the Supreme Poet" (il Sommo Poeta). Dante and the Divine Comedy have been a source of inspiration for artists for almost seven centuries. Dante, with Petrarch and Boccaccio are also known as "the three fountains". Dante is also called the "the Father of the Italian language". The first biography written on him was by his contemporary Giovanni Villani. The most famous section in La Divina Commedia is the first third of it, the first 34 cantos of the poem, called Inferno, which is Dante's vision of hell.

Contents

Life

Dante Alighieri was born in 1265, between May 14 and June 13, under the name "Durante Alighieri." ca. 1450 (Uffizi Gallery). His family was important in Florence, and supported the Papacy. The poet's mother was Bella degli Abati. She died when Dante was 7 years old, and Alighiero soon married again, to Lapa di Chiarissimo Cialuffi. Lapa had two children, Dante's brother Francesco and sister "Tana" ( short version of "Gaetana").

Dante fought in the front of the Guelph troops in the battle of Campaldino (June 11, 1289). After the victory Dante gained an important part in public life.

When Dante was 12, in 1277, he married Gemma di Manetto Donati. Dante had already fallen in love with another girl, Beatrice Portinari that is mentioned same in "Divine Comedy", (known also as Bice). Years after Dante's marriage to Gemma he met Beatrice again. He had become interested in writing poems.

Dante had six children with Gemma: Jacopo, Pietro, Giovanni, Gabrielle Alighieri, and Antonia.

Education, youth and poetry

Not much is known about Dante's education, and it is presumed he studied at home. It is known that he studied Tuscan poetry. His interests brought him to discover the Occitan poetry of the troubadours and the Latin poetry of classical antiquity (with a particular devotion to Virgil). At 18, Dante met Guido Cavalcanti, Lapo Gianni, Cino da Pistoia, and soon after Brunetto Latini; together they became the leaders of Dolce Stil Novo ("The Sweet New Style"). Brunetto later received a special mention in the Divine Comedy (Inferno, XV, 28), for what he had taught Dante.

When he was nine years old he met Beatrice Portinari, daughter of Folco Portinari, with whom he fell in love "at first sight", and apparently without even having spoken to her. He saw her frequently after age 18, often exchanging greetings in the street, but he never knew her well—he effectively set the example for the so-called "courtly love".Dante gave his imprint to the Stil Novo. Love for Beatrice (as in a different manner Petrarch would show for his Laura) would apparently be the reason for poetry and for living, together with political passions. In many of his poems, she appears such as semi-divine, watching over him constantly.

When Beatrice died in 1290, Dante tried to find an "help" in Latin literature.

He then dedicated himself to philosophical studies at religious schools like the Dominican one in Santa Maria Novella. This "excessive" passion for philosophy would later be criticized by the character Beatrice, in Purgatorio, the second book of the Divine Comedy.

File:Dante
Statue of Dante at the Uffizi, Florence.

Exile and death

Boniface quickly dismissed the other delegates and asked Dante alone to remain in Rome. At the same time (November 1, 1301), Charles de Valois entered Florence with Black Guelphs, who in the next six days destroyed much of the city and killed many of their enemies. A new Black Guelph government was installed and Messer Cante dei Gabrielli di Gubbio was appointed Podestà of Florence. Dante was put in exile for two years, and ordered to pay a large hill of money.

Dante did not pay the money, in part because he believed he was not guilty, and in part because all his needs in Florence had been stolen by the Black Guelphs. He was condemned to exile for live, and if he returned to Florence without paying the money, he could be burned at the stake.

In exile he began searching the foundation for the Divine Comedy, a work in 100 cantos, divided into three books of thirty-three cantos each, with a single introductory canto.

He went to Verona as a guest of Bartolomeo I della Scala, then moved to Sarzana in Liguria. Later, he is supposed to have lived in Lucca with Madame Gentucca. Some not sure sources say that he was also in Paris between 1308 and 1310.

File:Dante Ná
Statue of Dante in the Piazza Dante in Naples.
File:Dante.
A recreated death mask of Dante Alighieri (in Palazzo Vecchio, Florence).

[[File:|thumb|right|200px|The memorial tomb for Dante Alighieri at Basilica di Santa Croce in Florence.]]

File:Dantes tomb
Dante's tomb in Ravenna, built in 1780.

In 1310, the Holy Roman Emperor Henry VII of Luxembourg, marched 5,000 troops into Italy. Dante saw in him a new Charlemagne who would restore the office of the Holy Roman Emperor for re-take Florence from the Black Guelphs. He wrote to Henry and several Italian princes, demanding that they destroy the Black Guelphs. Mixing religion and private concerns, he invoked the worst anger of God against his city, suggesting several particular targets that coincided with his personal enemies. It was during this time that he wrote the first two books of the Divine Comedy.

When Dante died at Ravenna, the custodians of the body at Ravenna put the bones in a false wall of the monastery. Nevertheless, in 1829, a tomb was built for him in Florence in the basilica of Santa Croce. That tomb has been empty ever since, with Dante's body remaining in Ravenna, far from the land he loved so dearly. The front of his tomb in Florence reads Onorate l'altissimo poeta - which roughly translates as "Honour the most exalted poet".

File:Dante Alighieri de
Dante by Erminio Blotta, at Blvd. Oroño Rosario, Argentina

Others websites

mrj:Данте Алигьери


rue:Данте Аліґ’єрі


Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 20, 2010

Here are sentences from other pages on Dante Alighieri, which are similar to those in the above article.








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