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David Allen
Born December 28, 1945 (1945-12-28) (age 64)
Occupation Author, Consultant, Management expert
Spouse(s) Kathryn[1]

David Allen (born December 28, 1945) is a productivity consultant who is best known as the creator of the Getting Things Done time management method.

He grew up in Shreveport, Louisiana where he acted and won a state championship in debate. He went to college at New College, now New College of Florida, in Sarasota, Florida. His career path has included jobs as a magician, waiter, karate teacher, landscaper, vitamin distributor, glass-blowing lathe operator, travel agent, gas station manager, U-Haul dealer, moped salesman, restaurant cook,[1] personal growth trainer, manager of a lawn service company, and manager of a travel agency. He is also an ordained minister with the Movement of Spiritual Inner Awareness.[2][3] He claims to have had 35 professions before age 35.[4] He began applying his perspective on productivity with businesses in the 1980s when he was awarded a contract to design a program for executives and managers at Lockheed.

He is the founder of the David Allen Company, which is focused on productivity, action management and executive coaching. His Getting Things Done method is part of his coaching efforts. He was also one of the founders of Actioneer, Inc., a company specializing in productivity tools for the Palm Pilot.

Allen has written three books, Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity, which describes his productivity program and Ready for Anything: 52 Productivity Principles for Work and Life, a collection of newsletter articles he has written. His third book is Making It All Work: Winning at the Game of Work and Business of Life which is a follow-up to his first book. He lives in Ojai, California with his fourth wife, Kathryn[1], whom he describes as his "extraordinary partner in work and life" in the dedication of Getting Things Done.

References

  1. ^ a b c Paul Keegan, June 21, 2007 How David Allen mastered getting things doneBusiness 2.0
  2. ^ Jack Coats, 2000. "David Allen - Ministering to the Business Community" The New Day Herald online retrieved Jan. 18, 2008
  3. ^ Jack Coats, 2000. "Getting Things Done: David Allen's Keys to Completion" The New Day Herald online retrieved Oct. 24, 2007
  4. ^ David E. Williams, Feb. 9, 2007 Cutting through the clutter to get things done CNN

Further reading

External links

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Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

David Allen (born December 28, 1945) is a productivity consultant.

Contents

Sourced

Getting Things Done: The Art of Stress-Free Productivity (2001)

  • First of all, if it's on your mind, your mind isn't clear. Anything you consider unfinished in any way must be captured in a trusted system outside your mind, or what I call a collection bucket, that you know you'll come back to regularly and sort through.
    • Chapter 1
  • Most often, the reason something is "on your mind" is that you want it to be different than it currently is, and yet: you haven't clarified exactly what the intended outcomes is; you haven't decided what the very next physical action step is; and/or you haven't put reminders of the outcome and the action required in a system you trust. That's why it's on your mind.
    • Chapter 1
  • Here's how I define "stuff": anything you have allowed into your psychological or physical world that doesn't belong where it is, but for which you haven't yet determined the desired outcome and the next action step.
    • Chapter 1

Ready for Anything: 52 Productivity Principles for Work and Life (2003)

  • When you "have to get organized," you're probably not appropriately invested yet in what you need to get organized for.

External links

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