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David Cobb


In office
1809–1810
Governor Christopher Gore
Preceded by Levi Lincoln, Sr.
Succeeded by William Gray

Member of the
U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts' At-large District
In office
March 4, 1793 – March 3, 1795
Preceded by Elbridge Gerry
Succeeded by Samuel Lyman

President of the
Massachusetts State Senate
In office
1801–1805
Preceded by Samuel Phillips, Jr.
Succeeded by Harrison Gray Otis

In office
May, 1789[2] – January, 1793[3]
Preceded by Theodore Sedgwick
Succeeded by Edward Robbins

In office
May, 1789[5] – January, 1793[6]

Born September 14, 1748
Attleboro, Massachusetts
Died April 17, 1830
Taunton, Massachusetts
Political party Federalist
Spouse(s) Eleanor Bradish[7]
Relations Robert Treat Paine, brother in law.[8]
Children Eleanor Bradish Cobb, b. March 23, 1767; d. October 30, 1842.
Betsy Cobb, b. June 5, 1768.
Thomas Cobb, b. June 29, 1772; d. October 27, 1849.
William Gray Cobb, b. February 10, 1773; d. November 4, 1791.
Eunice Cobb, b. November 17, 1774; d. June 6, 1826.
Mary Cobb, b. July 26, 1776; d. October 17, 1851.
David Cobb, b. April 3, 1778.
Sally Cobb, b. January 15, 1780; d. age 17.
Ebenezer Bradish Cobb, b. October 30, 1781; d. 1840.
Henry Jackson Cobb, b. December 18, 1784; d. July, 1848.
David George Washington Cobb, January 14, 1790; February 27, 1832.[9]
Profession Physician
Signature
Military service
Allegiance  United States Continental Congress
Service/branch Continental Army,
Massachusetts Militia
Years of service 1776-1781
1786
Rank lieutenant colonel
major general
Unit 16th Massachusetts Regiment-Henry Jackson’s regiment Massachusetts Militia
aide-de-camp on the staff of General George Washington
Commands Fifth Division of the
Massachusetts Militia[10]
Battles/wars American Revolutionary War, New York and New Jersey campaign, Battle of Springfield, Battle of Monmouth.
Quaker Hill, R.I.[11]
Shays' Rebellion

David Cobb (September 14, 1748 – April 17, 1830) was a Massachusetts physician, military officer, jurist, and politician who served as a U.S. Congressman for the At-large District of Massachusetts.

Contents

Biography

Born in Attleboro, Massachusetts on September 14, 1748, Cobb graduated from Harvard College in 1766. He studied medicine in Boston and afterward practiced in Taunton, Massachusetts. He was a member of the Massachusetts Provincial Congress in 1775; lieutenant colonel of Jackson’s regiment in 1777 and 1778, serving in Rhode Island and New Jersey; was aide-de-camp on the staff of General George Washington; appointed major general of militia in 1786 and rendered conspicuous service during Shays Rebellion.

Massachusetts Government

Judge of the Bristol County Court of Common Pleas 1784-1796; member of the State house of representatives 1789-1793, and the Massachusetts Senate and served as Speaker of the Massachusetts House of Representatives and President of the Massachusetts Senate.

Congress

Elected to the Third United States Congress (March 4, 1793 – March 3, 1795), replacing Elbridge Gerry.

Maine

Cobb moved to Gouldsboro in the district of Maine in 1796 and engaged in agricultural pursuits; elected to the Massachusetts Senate from the eastern district of Maine in 1802 and served as president; elected to the Massachusetts Governor's Council in 1808; Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts in 1809; member of the board of military defense in 1812; chief justice of the Hancock County (Maine) court of common pleas; returned in 1817 to Taunton, where he died on April 17, 1830. His remains were interred in Plain Cemetery.

Legacy

In 1976, David Cobb was honored by being on a postage stamp for the United States Postal Service.

References

External links

Notes

  1. ^ Porter, Joseph Whitcomb (July,--August, 1888), Bangor Historical Magazine Vol. IV Memoir of Gen. David Cobb and family of Gouldsborough, Maine, and Taunton, Mass, Bangor, ME, p. 2. 
  2. ^ Porter, Joseph Whitcomb (July,--August, 1888), Bangor Historical Magazine Vol. IV Memoir of Gen. David Cobb and family of Gouldsborough, Maine, and Taunton, Mass, Bangor, ME, p. 2. 
  3. ^ Porter, Joseph Whitcomb (July,--August, 1888), Bangor Historical Magazine Vol. IV Memoir of Gen. David Cobb and family of Gouldsborough, Maine, and Taunton, Mass, Bangor, ME, p. 2. 
  4. ^ Porter, Joseph Whitcomb (July,--August, 1888), Bangor Historical Magazine Vol. IV Memoir of Gen. David Cobb and family of Gouldsborough, Maine, and Taunton, Mass, Bangor, ME, p. 2. 
  5. ^ Porter, Joseph Whitcomb (July,--August, 1888), Bangor Historical Magazine Vol. IV Memoir of Gen. David Cobb and family of Gouldsborough, Maine, and Taunton, Mass, Bangor, ME, p. 2. 
  6. ^ Porter, Joseph Whitcomb (July,--August, 1888), Bangor Historical Magazine Vol. IV Memoir of Gen. David Cobb and family of Gouldsborough, Maine, and Taunton, Mass, Bangor, ME, p. 2. 
  7. ^ Porter, Joseph Whitcomb (July,--August, 1888), Bangor Historical Magazine Vol. IV Memoir of Gen. David Cobb and family of Gouldsborough, Maine, and Taunton, Mass, Bangor, ME, p. 6. 
  8. ^ The Daughters of Liberty (1904), Historical researches of Gouldsboro, Maine, Gouldsboro, ME: The Daughters of Liberty, p. 22. 
  9. ^ Porter, Joseph Whitcomb (July,--August, 1888), Bangor Historical Magazine Vol. IV Memoir of Gen. David Cobb and family of Gouldsborough, Maine, and Taunton, Mass, Bangor, ME, pp. 6–7. 
  10. ^ Porter, Joseph Whitcomb (July,--August, 1888), Bangor Historical Magazine Vol. IV Memoir of Gen. David Cobb and family of Gouldsborough, Maine, and Taunton, Mass, Bangor, ME, p. 2. 
  11. ^ The Daughters of Liberty (1904), Historical researches of Gouldsboro, Maine, Gouldsboro, ME: The Daughters of Liberty, p. 22. 
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Elbridge Gerry
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's At-large congressional district

March 4, 1793 – March 4, 1795
Succeeded by
Samuel Lyman
Political offices
Preceded by
Levi Lincoln, Sr.
Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts
1809–1810
Succeeded by
William Gray
Preceded by
Samuel Phillips, Jr.
President of the
Massachusetts State Senate

1801–1805
Succeeded by
Harrison Gray Otis
Preceded by
'
Member of the
Massachusetts State Senate

1801–1805
Succeeded by
'
Preceded by
Theodore Sedgwick
Speaker of the
Massachusetts House of Representatives

May, 1789–January, 1793
Succeeded by
Edward Robbins
Preceded by
'
Member of the
Massachusetts House of Representatives

May, 1789–January, 1793
Succeeded by
'

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