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Davies
Family name
Region of origin Wales
Related names David, Davey, Davis

Davies is a common surname. It is patronymic of David, a Hebrew name meaning "beloved". Davies is a hugely popular name in Wales, owing to the name of its patron saint, David. The name stems from the Welsh Ap Dafydd, meaning "son of David". Families who held the name Dafis changed their name to Davies during the 19th century.

Davies is also fairly widespread in the south-west of Britain, especially Cornwall. Cornish variants of the name include Davies, Davis, Davie, Davye, Davey, Daves and Davyse. It has been argued that the Cornish name derives not from a patronymic but rather from the Cornish Dewnans, "Devon", thus referring to someone from Dumnonia or Devon, or alternatively from dew, meaning "dark". Whatever the origins it is interesting to note that many supposedly Welsh surnames are fairly widespread in Cornwall too, once known itself as West Wales. The name is also found in Brittany.

It may refer to many people.

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1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

DAVIES (DAVIsIus), John (1679-1732), English classical scholar and critic, was born in London on the 22nd of April 1679. He was educated at Charterhouse and Queens' College, Cambridge, of which society he was elected fellow (July 7th, 1701). He subsequently became rector of Fen Ditton, prebendary of Ely, and president of his college. He died on the 7th of March 1731-1732, and was buried in the college chapel. Davies was considered one of the best commentators on Cicero, his attention being chiefly devoted to the philosophical works of that author. Amongst these he edited the Tusculanae dispu- .tationes (1709), De natura deorum (1718), De divinatione and De fato (1725), Academica (1725), De legibus (1727), De finibus (1728). His nearly finished notes on the De officiis he bequeathed to Dr Richard Mead, with a view to their publication. Mead, finding himself unable to carry out the undertaking, transferred the notes to Thomas Bentley (nephew of the famous Richard Bentley), by whose carelessness they were burnt. Davies's editions, which were intended to supplement those of Graevius, show great learning and an extensive knowledge of the history and systems of philosophy, but he allows himself too much licence in the matter of emendation. He also edited Maximus of Tyre's Dissertationes (1703); the works of Caesar (1706); the Octavius of Minucius Felix (1707);(1707); the Epitome divinarum institutionum of Lactantius (1718). Although on intimate terms with Richard Bentley, he found himself unable to agree with the great scholar in regard to his dispute with Trinity College.


<< Sir John Davies

Sir Louis Henry Davies >>


Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Contents

English

Proper noun

Singular
Davies

Plural
-

Davies

  1. A Welsh and English patronymic surname derived from the given name Davy or David.

Usage notes

Very common in Wales in this spelling, while Davis is common in the U.S.

Anagrams


Wikispecies

Up to date as of January 23, 2010
(Redirected to Hugh Davies article)

From Wikispecies

Welsh bryologist   (1739-1821)   (Davies)

Algae, Fungi and Lichens, Spermatophytes

External links


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