The Full Wiki

De jure: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Did you know ...


More interesting facts on De jure

Include this on your site/blog:

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

De jure (in Classical Latin de iure) is an expression that means "concerning law", as contrasted with de facto, which means "concerning fact".

The terms de jure and de facto are used instead of "in principle" and "in practice", respectively, when one is describing political or legal situations.

In a legal context, de jure is also translated as "concerning law". A practice may exist de facto, where for example the people obey a contract as though there were a law enforcing it yet there is no such law. A process known as "desuetude" may allow de facto practices to replace obsolete laws. On the other hand, practices may exist de jure and not be obeyed or observed by the people.

Social sciences and other usages

As a logical complement of "de facto", where "de facto" has a more generic acceptance (not so restrictive as at legal context), like in social sciences. See de facto standards and other usages.

See also


De jure (in Classical Latin de iure) is an expression that means "concerning law", as contrasted with de facto, which means "concerning fact".

The terms de jure and de facto are used instead of "in principle" and "in practice", respectively, when one is describing political or legal situations.

In a legal context, de jure is also translated as "concerning law". A practice may exist de facto, where for example the people obey a contract as though there were a law enforcing it, yet there is no such law. A process known as "desuetude" may allow de facto practices to replace obsolete laws. On the other hand, practices may exist de jure and not be obeyed or observed by the people.

See also

Advertisements

Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010
(Redirected to de jure article)

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

Contents

English

Wikipedia-logo.png
Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Etymology

Latin "according to law".

Adjective

de jure (not comparable)

  1. By right.
  2. In accordance with the law.

Antonyms


Simple English

De jure is an expression from the Latin words meaning "in law".[1]

It is often used in contrast to de facto (which means "in fact", or "in practice") when talking about law, governance, or technique. When talking about law, "de jure" is used to describe what the law says, and "de facto" is used to describe what actually happens.

Examples

Abkhazia ... is a de jure autonomous republic within Georgia, but is de facto independent of Georgia
This means that legally the territory of Abkhazia is a part of the country of Georgia, but that it is in effect independent.

The de jure name of Bill Clinton is William Jefferson Clinton. This is his name according to official records. His de facto name is Bill Clinton because this is what he is usually called.

References



Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message