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Def Jam: Icon
Cover of the Xbox 360 version of Def Jam: Icon.
Developer(s) EA Chicago
Def Jam
Publisher(s) Electronic Arts
Series Def Jam
Aspect ratio 720p
Platform(s) PlayStation 3, Xbox 360
Release date(s) USA March 6, 2007
AUS March 15, 2007
EUR March 23, 2007
Genre(s) Fighting
Mode(s) 1 Player Story
1-2 Player versus
Online Match Play
Rating(s) ESRB: M
BBFC: 18
Media Blu-ray Disc
DVD-DL

Def Jam: Icon is a fighting game, and is the third in Electronic Arts's Def Jam-licensed hip hop video game series. The game was developed by EA Chicago, developers of Fight Night: Round 3 and is the first Def Jam game not to be developed by AKI Corporation. Unlike the previous games in the series, the game's soundtrack is completely uncensored and controllable. The game was released for the PlayStation 3 and xbox 360 Consoles on March 6, 2007 through GameStop Pre-Orders, and March 8, 2007 for all other gaming outlets.

Contents

Features

It features around 30 artists and is much less wrestling-oriented than the previous games, Def Jam Vendetta and Def Jam: Fight for NY. The game's executive producer, Kudo Tsunoda, has stated that he did not feel that wrestling and hip-hop went particularly well with each other. However, throws and environmental damage remain in the game.

Gameplay is similar to EA Chicago's Fight Night: Round 3, featuring a focus on up-close brawling, mixing up high and low attacks, blocks, throws, and parries, and using the right analog stick to deliver stronger attacks. Also, like Round 3, there is no in-game heads up display by default, encouraging the player to observe physical cues on in-game characters to determine their health, such as ripped and burned clothing, bruises, and an overall look of exhaustion of the opponent.

The developers aimed to make the music and the environment a much larger factor in the fight. The environments includes rooftops, streets, subways, gas stations, two clubs, an Atlanta neighborhood, BET's 106 and Park stage, and other locales, as opposed to the wrestling rings or arenas of the previous Def Jam titles. In addition, the producers promised massive levels of interactivity within each environment. Fighters bleed and show visible signs of their injuries as fights progress and as the player's character gets hurt.

The music actually effects the environment. The entire backdrop bumps to the beat of the background music. Different events occur on the beats of each song - some of which are dangerous. For example, a column of fire shoots up from a ruined gas station on every "bass hit" of a song's chorus. Other changes will be purely cosmetic: hubcaps on cars will spin and twinkle to the beat of each song. The developers have added more damage to a fighter's punches and kicks if they occur "to the beat" or making a rapper stronger if one of their songs is playing. By listening to the beat of the song and then timing a throw, the player can toss his opponent into an environmental hazard just as it goes off. On the Xbox 360 Console, players are also able to load up their own music (Custom Soundtracks), and the game has a form of beat detection to find the beats from any song. the game includes these real-life-rappers like Ludacris, T.I., Mike Jones, Sean Paul, Young Jeezy, Bun B, Ghostface Killah, Big Boi, The Game, and many others including British rapper Kano.

Controls

Def Jam: Icon features various controls which, used correctly, can cause severe damage to another fighter. Up to four attacks can be used in a combo, with a directional stick to be used as the fourth attack (but not the fifth). Depending on the amount of damage caused in the four hits, a fighter can cause an opponent to stagger backwards slightly, knock directly down, or fly across the venue.

Fighting styles

The game features six fighting styles:

Demo

The demo, originally announced as single player, but actually features a Versus mode, available on the Xbox Live Marketplace and PlayStation Store, features T.I., Ludacris, Jim Jones and Big Boi as playable fighters with their songs "Top Back", "Get Back", "We Fly High", and "Kryptonite" respectively, and the Gas Station level. The player can only play as Big Boi with the CPU as T.I. Or Ludacris vs the CPU and Jim Jones. The game does feature a versus mode where the first player must be Big Boi and the second as T.I. The game is fully playable in this venue and features how the fighting system functions in the real game. After a 2 minute time limit, the game stops and returns to the Press Start screen, no matter which fighter is winning.

Reception

  • IGN rated Def Jam: Icon 7.0 /10, praising the uncensored soundtrack, "beautifully rendered" visuals and the "My Soundtrack" feature on the Xbox 360 version, but criticized "weak fighting moves" and "inconsistent game mechanics."[1]
  • Game Rankings has a press average score of 69.91% for the Xbox 360 version[2] and 68.86% for the PlayStation 3 version.[3]

Notes and references

External links

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Def Jam: Icon
Developer(s) EA Chicago
Def Jam
Publisher(s) Electronic Arts
Series Def Jam
Platform(s) PlayStation 3, Xbox 360
Release date(s)
  • NA March 6, 2007
  • AUS March 15, 2007
  • EU March 23, 2007
Genre(s) Fighting
Mode(s) 1 Player Story
1-2 Player versus
Online Match Play
Rating(s) ESRB: M
BBFC: 18
PEGI: 18+
OFLC: M
Media Blu-ray Disc
DVD-DL

Def Jam: Icon is a fighting game, and is the third in Electronic Arts's Def Jam-licensed hip hop video game series. The game was developed by EA Chicago, developers of Fight Night Round 3 and is the first Def Jam game not to be developed by AKI Corporation. Unlike the previous games in the series, the game's soundtrack is completely uncensored and controllable. The game was released for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 Consoles on March 6, 2007 through GameStop Pre-Orders, and March 8, 2007 for all other gaming outlets.

Contents

Features

It features around 30 artists and is much less wrestling-oriented than the previous games, Def Jam Vendetta and Def Jam: Fight for NY. The game's executive producer, Kudo Tsunoda, has stated that he did not feel that wrestling and hip-hop went particularly well with each other. However, throws and environmental damage remain in the game.

Gameplay is similar to EA Chicago's Fight Night: Round 3, featuring a focus on up-close brawling, mixing up high and low attacks, blocks, throws, and parries, and using the right analog stick to deliver stronger attacks. Also, like Round 3, there is no in-game heads up display by default, encouraging the player to observe physical cues on in-game characters to determine their health, such as ripped and burned clothing, bruises, and an overall look of exhaustion of the opponent.

The developers aimed to make the music and the environment a much larger factor in the fight. The environments includes rooftops, streets, subways, gas stations, two clubs, an Atlanta neighborhood, BET's 106 and Park stage, and other locales, as opposed to the wrestling rings or arenas of the previous Def Jam titles. In addition, the producers promised massive levels of interactivity within each environment. Fighters bleed and show visible signs of their injuries as fights progress and as the player's character gets hurt.

The music actually effects the environment. The entire backdrop bumps to the beat of the background music. Different events occur on the beats of each song - some of which are dangerous. For example, a column of fire shoots up from a ruined gas station on every "bass hit" of a song's chorus. Other changes will be purely cosmetic: hubcaps on cars will spin and twinkle to the beat of each song. The developers have added more damage to a fighter's punches and kicks if they occur "to the beat" or making a rapper stronger if one of their songs is playing. By listening to the beat of the song and then timing a throw, the player can toss his opponent into an environmental hazard just as it goes off. On the Xbox 360 Console, players are also able to load up their own music (Custom Soundtracks), and the game has a form of beat detection to find the beats from any song. The game includes these real-life-rappers like Ludacris, T.I., Mike Jones, Sean Paul, Young Jeezy, Bun B, Ghostface Killah, Big Boi, The Game, Lil Jon and many others including British rapper Kano.

Controls

Def Jam: Icon features various controls which, if used correctly, can cause severe damage to another fighter. Up to four attacks can be used in a combo, with a directional stick to be used as the fourth attack . Depending on the amount of damage caused in the four hits, a fighter can cause an opponent to stagger backwards slightly, knock directly down, or fly across the venue.

Fighting styles

The game features six fighting styles:

Demo

The demo, originally announced as single player, but actually features a Versus mode, available on the Xbox Live Marketplace and PlayStation Store, features T.I., Ludacris, Jim Jones and Big Boi as playable fighters with their songs "Top Back", "Get Back", "We Fly High", and "Kryptonite" respectively, and the Gas Station level. The player can only play as Big Boi with the CPU as T.I. Or Ludacris vs the CPU and Jim Jones. The game does feature a versus mode where the first player must be Big Boi and the second as T.I. The game is fully playable in this venue and features how the fighting system functions in the real game. After a 2 minute time limit, the game stops and returns to the Press Start screen, no matter which fighter is winning.

Reception

  • IGN rated Def Jam: Icon 7 /10, praising the uncensored soundtrack, "beautifully rendered" visuals and the "My Soundtrack" feature on the Xbox 360 version, but criticized "weak fighting moves" and "inconsistent game mechanics". [1]
  • Game Rankings has a press average score of 69.91% for the Xbox 360 version[2] and 68.86% for the PlayStation 3 version.[3]

Notes and references

External links


Gaming

Up to date as of February 01, 2010

From Wikia Gaming, your source for walkthroughs, games, guides, and more!

Def Jam: Icon

Developer(s) EA
Publisher(s) EA
Release date March 6, 2007
Genre Fighting
Mode(s) Single player
Age rating(s) ESRB: M
Platform(s) Xbox 360 PS3
Input Controller
Credits | Soundtrack | Codes | Walkthrough



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Def Jam
Vendetta | Fight for NY | Fight for NY: The Takeover | Icon

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