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Ellen Kushner

Delia Sherman (right) with Ellen Kushner (photograph by Keyan Bowes)
Born
Tokyo, Japan
Nationality American
Alma mater Brown University and Vassar College
Genres Speculative fiction
Spouse(s) Ellen Kushner
Official website

Delia Sherman (born Tokyo, Japan) is a fantasy writer and editor. Her novel The Porcelain Dove won the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award. She lives in New York City with her wife and sometime collaborator, Ellen Kushner (they were married in 1996[1][2]).

Her three novels for adults are all exemplars of the subgenre Fantasy of Manners:

  • Through a Brazen Mirror (1988)
  • The Porcelain Dove (1993)
  • The Fall of the Kings (2002) (with Ellen Kushner}

Her most recent novel is Changeling (2006), for younger readers. It is set in "New York Between," a world she has explored in various short stories.

She is co-editor (with Kaitlen Clarke and Donald G. Keller) of the fantasy anthology The Horns of Elfland, and (with Terri Windling) of The Essential Bordertown.

With Clarke and others, she is actively involved in the Interstitial art movement. She was a founding member of (and the first president of) the Interstitial Arts Foundation. She is also a member of the Endicott Studio. Together with Kushner, she was an instructor at the Clarion Workshop 2007 in San Diego.

Contents

Bibliography

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Novels

  • Through a Brazen Mirror (1988)
  • The Porcelain Dove (1993)
  • The Fall of the Kings (2002) (with Ellen Kushner}
  • Changeling (2006)
  • The Magic Mirror of the Mermaid Queen (2009)

Edited

References

  1. ^ Bickelhaupt, Susan; Maureen Dezell (1996-10-25). "Will Klein Sign His Letters From Washington?". The Boston Globe.  
  2. ^ Simon, Clea (2004-09-01). "It was love, but now it's gone". The Boston Globe. http://www.boston.com/ae/food/articles/2004/09/01/it_was_love_but_now_its_gone/. Retrieved 2007-08-10.  

External links


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