Demographics of Poland: Wikis

Advertisements
  
  
  

Note: Many of our articles have direct quotes from sources you can cite, within the Wikipedia article! This article doesn't yet, but we're working on it! See more info or our list of citable articles.

Encyclopedia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Demographics of Poland is about the demographic features of the population of Poland, including population density, ethnicity, education level, health of the populace, economic status, religious affiliations and other aspects of the population.

According to the estimates of Polish Central Statistical Office (GUS), at the end of 2007 Poland had a population of 38,115,000, which translates into average population density of 122 people/km² (urban 1105 per 1 km², rural 50 per 1 km²). 61.5% of Polish population lives in the urban areas, a number which is slowly diminishing. Poland is the 33rd most populous country in the world (9th in Europe, with 5.4% of European population). Total population of Poland is decreasing (population growth was -0,04%). Average life expectancy was 70.5 for men and 78.9 for women. In 2009 it is expected to be 73.1 for men and 79.5 for women. Population distribution is uneven. From ethnic perspective, Poland is very homogeneous, with 96.7% of population being Polish.

Demographics of Poland, Data of FAO, 1961-2010 ; Number of inhabitants in millions.

A number of censuses have assessed this data, including a national census in 2002, and a survey by the Helsinki Foundation for Human Rights (HFHR), which confirmed there are numerous autochthonous ethnic groups in Poland. Estimates by INTEREG and Eurominority present a similar demographics picture of Poland but they provide estimates only for the most numerous of the autochthonous ethnic groups.

Contents

Historical population

For many centuries, until the end of Second World War, the Polish population was composed of many significant ethnic minorities. The population of Poland decreased due to the losses sustained during World War II, and became one of the most ethnically homogeneous in the world as a result of the radically altered borders after the war and the subsequent migrations. This homogeneity is a result of the post-World War II ethnic cleansing of the German population and deportations ordered by the Soviet authorities, who wished to remove the sizable Polish minorities from Lithuania, Belarus and Ukraine and deportations of Ukrainians from Poland.

Nationalities

96.7% of the people of Poland claim Polish nationality, and 97.8% declare that they speak Polish at home (Census 2002).

Largest metropolitan and urban areas

Population numbers by database
Area ESPON [1] Eurostat LUZ [2] Ministry of Regional Development[3] United Nations [4] Demographia.com[5] Citypopulation.de[6] Scientific study by T. Markowski[7] Scientific study by Swianiewicz, Klimska [8]
Katowice (Katowice urban area) 3,029,000 [9](5,294,000) 2,710,397 3,239,200 3,069,000 2,500,000 2,775,000 2,746,000 2,733,000
Warsaw 2,785,000 2,660,406 2,680,600 2,194,000 2,030,000 2,375,000 2,631,900 2,504,000
Kraków 1,236,000 1,264,322 1,227,200 818,000 700,000 Not listed 1,257,500 1,367,000
Łódź 1,165,000 1,163,516 1,061,600 974,000 950,000 1,060,000 1,178,000 1,129,000
Gdańsk 993,000 1,105,203 1,220,800 854,000 775,000 No data 1,098,400 1,210,000
Poznań 919,000 1,018,511 1,227,200 No data 600,000 No data 1,011,200 846,000
Wrocław 861,000 1,031,439 1,136,900 No data 600,000 No data 1,029,800 956,000

Demographics by voivodeship

   City  Voivodeship  Inhabitants
May 20, 2002
Inhabitants
December 31, 2004
Inhabitants
December 31, 2006
1 Warsaw (Warszawa) Masovia 1,671,670 1,692,854 1,702,139
2 Łódź Łódź 789,318 774,004 760,251
3 Kraków Lesser Poland 758,544 757,430 756,267
4 Wrocław Lower Silesia 640,367 636,268 634,630
5 Poznań Greater Poland 578,886 570,778 564,951
6 Gdańsk Pomerania 461,334 459,072 456,658
7 Szczecin Western Pomerania 415,399 411,900 409,068
8 Bydgoszcz Kuyavia-Pomerania 373,804 368,235 363,468
9 Lublin Lublin 357,110 355,998 353,483
10 Katowice Silesia 327,222 319,904 314,500
11 Białystok Podlaskie 291,383 292,150 294,830
12 Gdynia Pomerania 253,458 253,324 251,844
13 Częstochowa Silesia 251,436 248,032 245,030
14 Radom Masovia 229,699 227,613 225,810
15 Sosnowiec Silesia 232,622 228,192 245,030
16 Toruń Kuyavia-Pomerania 211,243 208,278 207,190
17 Kielce Świętokrzyskie 212,429 209,455 207,188
18 Gliwice Silesia 203,814 200,361 198,499
19 Zabrze Silesia 195,293 192,546 190,110
20 Bytom Silesia 193,546 189,535 186,540
21 Bielsko-Biała Silesia 178,028 176,987 176,453
22 Olsztyn Warmia-Masuria 173,102 174,550 174,941
23 Rzeszów Subcarpathia 160,376 159,020 165,578
24 Ruda Śląska Silesia 150,595 147,403 145,471
25 Rybnik Silesia 142,731 141,755 141,388
26 Tychy Silesia 132,816 131,547 130,492
27 Dąbrowa Górnicza Silesia 132,236 130,789 129,559
28 Opole Opole 129,946 128,864 127,602
29 Płock Masovia 128,361 127,841 127,224
30 Elbląg Warmia-Masuria 128,134 127,655 126,985
31 Gorzów Wielkopolski Lubusz 125,914 125,578 125,504
32 Wałbrzych Lower Silesia 130,268 127,566 124,988
33 Włocławek Kuyavia-Pomerania 121,229 120,369 119,256
34 Zielona Góra Lubusz 118,293 118,516 118,115
35 Tarnów Lesser Poland 119,913 118,267 116,967
36 Chorzów Silesia 117,430 115,241 113,978
37 Kalisz Greater Poland 109,498 108,792 108,477
38 Koszalin Western Pomerania 108,709 107,773 107,693
39 Legnica Lower Silesia 107,100 106,143 105,186
40 Grudziądz Kuyavia-Pomerania 99,943 98,757 99,244
41 Słupsk Pomerania 100,376 99,827 98,092

Statistics

The following demographic statistics are from the CIA World Factbook, unless otherwise indicated.

Advertisements

Population

38,482,919 (July 2009 est.)

Population growth rate

+0.047% (2009 est.)

Birth rate

10.9 births/1,000 population (2009 est.)

There were 389,000 births in 2007 compared to 374,244 in 2006. [2]

Death rate

10.0 deaths/1,000 population (2009 est.)

There were 372,000 deaths in 2007 compared to 369,000 in 2006. [3]

Net migration rate

-0.4 migrants/1,000 population (2009 est.)

Total asylum seekers admitted

94,500 (2006)

Age structure

0–14 years: 15% (male 2,964,995/female 2,802,278)
15–64 years: 71.6% (male 13,713,078/female 13,845,251)
65 years and over: 13.4% (male 1,966,406/female 3,190,911) (2009 est.)

Sex ratio

at birth: 1.06 male(s)/female
under 15 years: 1.05 male(s)/female
15–64 years: 0.99 male(s)/female
65 years and over: 0.62 male(s)/female
total population: 0.94 male(s)/female (2005 est.)

Infant mortality rate

total: 6.8 deaths/1,000 live births
male: 7.52 deaths/1,000 live births
female: 6.03 deaths/1,000 live births (2009 est.)

Life expectancy at birth

total population: 76.28 years
male: 73.12 years
female: 79.44 years (2009 est.)

Total fertility rate

1.39 children born/woman, with 1.30 for urban areas and 1.53 for rural areas (2008 est.). The 2008 Total fertility rate of 1.39 is a significant improvement over 1.31 in 2007.[10]

Ethnic groups

Polish 96.7%, German 0.4%, Byelorussian 0.1%, Ukrainian 0.1%, other 0.7%, unspecified 2.7% (Census 2002)

Religions

Roman Catholic 89.8% (about 75% practicing), Eastern Orthodox 1.3%, Protestant 0.3%, other 0.3%, unspecified 8.3% (2002 census)

see Religion in Poland and Catholic Church in Poland

Languages

Polish 97.8%, other and unspecified 2.2% (Census 2002)

Literacy

definition: age 15 and over can read and write
total population: 99.8%
male: 99.8%
female: 99.7% (2003 est.)

Notes

  1. ^ European Spatial Planning Observation Network, Study on Urban Functions (Project 1.4.3), Final Report, Chapter 3, (ESPON, 2007)
  2. ^ Eurostat, Urban Audit database, accessed on 2009-03-12. Data for 2004.
  3. ^ "Koncepcja przestrzennego zagospodarowania kraju" - Ministerstwo Rozwoju Regionalnego, 2003
  4. ^ World Urbanization Prospects - United Nations - Department of Economic and Social Affairs / Population Division, The 2003 Revision (data of 2000)
  5. ^ Demographia.com - World Urban Areas
  6. ^ Thomas Brinkoff, Principal Agglomerations of the World, accessed on 2009-03-12. Data for 2009-01-01.
  7. ^ Funkcje Metropolitalne Pięciu Stolic Województw Wschodnich
  8. ^ "Społeczne i polityczne zróżnicowanie aglomeracji w Polsce" - Paweł Swianiewicz, Urszula Klimska; University of Warsaw 2005
  9. ^ Data of polycentric Silesian metropolitan area
  10. ^ [1]

See also

External links


Advertisements






Got something to say? Make a comment.
Your name
Your email address
Message