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Dennis Hull: Wikis

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Born November 19, 1944 (1944-11-19) (age 65),
Pointe Anne, Ontario
Height
Weight
6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
185 lb (84 kg; 13 st 3 lb)
Position Left Wing
Shot Left
Pro clubs Chicago Black Hawks
Detroit Red Wings
Ntl. team  Canada
Career 1964 – 1978

Dennis William Hull (born November 19 1944 in Pointe Anne, (now part of Belleville, Ontario), Canada is a retired professional ice hockey left wing, most notably for the Chicago Black Hawks of the National Hockey League. He is the brother of Bobby Hull and uncle of Brett Hull.

Contents

Career

As a player he was in the shadow of his older brother Bobby Hull, where they were both teammates on the Chicago Black Hawks for eight seasons.

Dennis emerged as a star player on his own, scoring over 300 goals in his own right, and earning the nickname "the Silver Jet" (Bobby was known as "the Golden Jet"). Some commentators often wondered whether Bobby or Dennis had the harder shot.

When Bobby was excluded from the 1972 Summit Series because he played in the WHA, Dennis initially planned to boycott the event as well as a show of support for his brother, but Bobby persuaded him to stay on Team Canada. During the series, Hull took over from Vic Hadfield for the left wing position on the New York Rangers "Goal A Game" line with Jean Ratelle and Rod Gilbert, managing two goals and two assists in four games.[1]

He was named a Second Team All-Star and played in five NHL All-Star Games. His best years were as part of the "MPH" (pun on 'miles per hour' using each player's last initials) line with centre Pit Martin and right wing Jim Pappin. The line was considered one of the better units in the NHL in the early to mid 1970's. He recorded seasons of 40, 30, 39 and 29 goals from 1971 through 1974. His best season was in 1973 when he recorded 39 goals and 51 assists for 90 points. He was instrumental in Chicago's appearance in the Stanley Cup Finals that season. Hull led the team with 9 goals and 15 assists for 24 points, finishing second in playoff scoring that season.

He played 14 seasons in the National Hockey League, with the Chicago Black Hawks (1964-1977) and Detroit Red Wings (1977–78).

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After Hockey

Upon retirement as a player, he became a broadcaster, as well as an educator, returning to St. Catharines, Ontario, where he played Ontario Hockey League Junior hockey (St. Catharines Teepees 1960-1964), to study at Brock University, graduating with a degree in History and Physical Education. He then taught at Ridley College and then became Athletic Director of Illinois Tech in Chicago.

Recently, he has been noted as a public speaker and comedian, and continues to operate a cattle farm raising polled herefords[2] with his brother Gary in Northumberland County, Ontario. He has written a book entitled "The Third Best Hull" (ECW Press) which contains entertaining and often hilarious memoirs of his hockey career. Hull became good friends with Soviet goaltending legend Vladislav Tretiak, whom he had played against during the 1972 Summit Series, recalling "I told Tretiak that he's become famous for letting in [Henderson's] goal...I said to him that 'if you had stopped it, you'd probably be a cab driver in Moscow today.' "[3]

He was recently signed by STA (Shewciw Talent Agengy) and is currently touring with the Original Kings of Comedy.

Accomplishments and awards

Career statistics

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1960–61 St. Catharines Teepees OHA 47 6 4 10 0
1961–62 St. Catharines Teepees OHA 50 6 12 18 0
1962–63 St. Catharines Black Hawks OHA 50 19 29 48 0
1963–64 St. Catharines Black Hawks OHA 55 48 49 97 0
1964–65 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 55 10 4 14 18 6 0 0 0 0
1965–66 St. Louis Braves CPHL 40 11 16 27 14 5 2 1 3 0
1965–66 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 25 1 5 6 6 3 0 0 0 0
1966–67 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 70 25 17 42 33 6 0 1 1 12
1967–68 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 74 18 15 33 34 11 1 3 4 6
1968–69 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 72 30 34 64 25
1969–70 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 76 17 35 52 31 8 5 2 7 0
1970–71 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 78 40 26 66 16 18 7 6 13 2
1971–72 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 78 30 39 69 10 8 4 2 6 4
1972–73 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 78 39 51 90 27 16 9 15 24 4
1973–74 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 74 29 39 68 15 10 6 3 9 0
1974–75 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 69 16 21 37 10 5 0 2 2 0
1975–76 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 80 27 39 66 28 4
1976–77 Chicago Black Hawks NHL 75 16 17 33 2 2 1 0 1 0
1977–78 Detroit Red Wings NHL 55 5 9 14 6 7 0 0 0 2
NHL totals 959 303 351 654 261 104 33 34 77 30

References

External links


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