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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This word has distinct meanings in other fields: see denotation (semiotics). For the opposite of Denotation see Connotation.

  • In media-studies terminology, denotation is an example of the first level of analysis: what the audience can visually see on a page. Denotation often refers to something literal, and avoids being a metaphor. Here it is usually coupled with connotation which is the second level of analysis, being what the denotation represents.

In logic and formal semantics, denotation always attracts the extension meaning of the intension / extension pair, but the other element genuinely varies. See intension for some more discussion.

Denotation is often associated with symbolism, as the denotation of a particular media text often represents something further; a hidden meaning (or an Engima Code) is often encoded into a media text (such as the images below).

In order to understand the difference between denotation and connotation in the media studies and semiotics uses it may be helpful to consider the following examples:

Examples

Example one.

The denotation of this example is a red rose with a green stem. The connotation is that it is a symbol of passion and love - this is what the rose represents.

Example two.

The denotation is a brown cross. The connotation is a symbol of religion, according to the media connotation. However, to be more specific this is a symbol of Christianity.

Example seven .

The denotation is a representation of a cartoon heart. The connotation is a symbol of love and affection, not in the way of a rose, but a symbol of true love.

External links

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1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From LoveToKnow 1911

DENOTATION (from Lat. denotare, to mark out, specify), in logic, a technical term used strictly as the correlative of Connotation, to describe one of the two functions of a concrete term. The concrete term "connotes" attributes and "denotes" all the individuals which, as possessing these attributes, constitute the genus or species described by the term. Thus "cricketer" denotes the individuals who play cricket, and connotes the qualities or characteristics by which these individuals are marked. In this sense, in which it was first used by J. S. Mill, Denotation is equivalent to Extension, and Connotation to Intension. It is clear that when the given term is qualified by a limiting adjective the Denotation or Extension diminishes, while the Connotation or Intension increases; e.g. a generic term like "flower" has a larger Extension, and a smaller Intension than "rose": "rose" than "moss-rose." In more general language Denotation is used loosely for that which is meant or indicated by a word, phrase, sentence or even an action. Thus a proper name or even an abstract term is said to have Denotaticn. (See CONNOTATION.)


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Simple English

For the opposite of Denotation see Connotation.
Simple English Wiktionary has the word meaning for:

Examples

In order to understand fully the difference between denotation and connotation in the media studies and semiotics uses it is necessary to become familiar with some examples:

The denotation of this example is a red rose with a green stem. The connotation is that it is a symbol of passion and love - this is what the rose represents.

The denotation is a brown cross. The connotation is a symbol of religion, according to the media connotation. However, to be more specific this is a symbol of Christianity.

The denotation is a representation of a cartoon heart. The connotation is a symbol of love and affection, not in the way of a rose, but a symbol of true love.

:

Different aspects of meaning

Several parts of meaning may be called denotation. That depends on the contrast being drawn.

    • Connotation and denotation are either
      • in basic semantics and literary theory, the figurative and literal meanings of a word, or
      • in philosophy, logic and parts of linguistics, the intension and extension of a word
    • Denotation can be synonymous with reference in the sense and reference in philosophy of language.
  • In Computer science, denotational semantics is contrasted with operational semantics.
  • In Semiotics, denotation also has its own meaning.
  • In media-studies terminology, denotation is the first level of analysis: what the audience can visually see on a page. Denotation often refers to something literal, and avoids being a metaphor. Here it is usually coupled with connotation which is the second level of analysis, being what the denotation represents

In logic and semantics, denotational always attracts the extension meaning "in the pair", but the other element genuinely varies. See intension for some more discussion.

A denotation is the strict, literal, dictionary definition of a word, devoid of any emotion, attitude, or colour.

Denotation often links with symbolism, as the denotation of a particular media text often represents something further; a hidden meaning (or an Engima Code) is often encoded into a media text (such as the images below).

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