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USS Des Moines CA-134.jpg
USS Des Moines (CA-134)
Class overview
Name: Des Moines class heavy cruiser
Operators: US flag 48 stars.svg United States Navy
Preceded by: Oregon City class cruiser
Succeeded by: None
Completed: 3
Cancelled: 9[1][2]
Retired: 3
Preserved: 1
General characteristics
Type: Heavy cruiser
Displacement: 17,000 tons (15422 tonnes)
Length: 716 ft 6 in (218.39 m)
Beam: 76 ft 6 in (23.32 m)
Draft: 22 ft (6.7 m)
Propulsion: 4 shafts
General Electric turbines
4 boiler
120,000 shp (89484 kW)
Speed: 33 kn (61 km/h)
Range: 10,500 nmi at 15 knots
(19446 km at 27.8 km/h)
Complement: 1,799 officers and enlisted
Armament:
Armor: 6 in (150 mm) Belt
8 in (200 mm) Turrets
3+12 in (89 mm) Deck
6+12 in (170 mm) Conning Tower

The Des Moines class cruisers were a group of U.S. Navy heavy cruisers, commissioned in 1948-1949. They were the last and the largest of the all-gun heavy cruisers. Derived from the Baltimore-class heavy cruisers, they were larger, had an improved machinery layout, and carried a new design of auto-loading, rapid-fire 8"/55 gun (the Mk16).[3][4][5] The improved Mk16 guns of the main battery were the first auto-loading 8" guns fielded by the US Navy, and allowed a much higher rate of fire than earlier designs, capable of sustaining 7 shots per minute per barrel, or about twice that of the Mk12s found on the Baltimore class.[4] The auto-loading mechanism could function at any elevation, giving even these large-caliber guns some anti-aircraft ability.[4] While the secondary battery of six twin 5"/38 Mk12 DP guns was essentially unchanged from the preceding Oregon City and Baltimore class cruisers, the Des Moines class carried a stronger battery of small-caliber anti-aircraft guns, including 12 twin 3-inch/50 Mk27 and later Mk33 guns, superior to the earlier ships' quad-mounted 40mm Bofors.[4]

Three ships of the class were completed: Des Moines (CA-134), Salem (CA-139), and Newport News (CA-148). The first two were decommissioned in 1959 and 1961, respectively, but Newport News remained in commission until 1975, having the distinction of being the last active all-gun cruiser in the U.S. Navy. Salem is a museum ship in Quincy, Massachusetts. Newport News was scrapped in 1993, and Des Moines was scrapped in 2006-2007. Dallas (CA-140) and eight other ships (CA-141 through CA-143 and CA-149 through CA-153) were cancelled at the end of World War II.[2][4]

See also

References

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Class overview
Name:Des Moines class heavy cruiser
Operators:United States Navy
Preceded by:Oregon City class cruiser
Succeeded by:None
Completed:3
Cancelled:9[1][2]
Retired:3
Preserved:1
General characteristics

Type: Heavy cruiser
Displacement: 17,000 long tons (17,300 metric tons)
Length: 716 ft 6 in (218.39 m)
Beam: 76 ft 6 in (23.32 m)
Draft: 22 ft (6.7 m)
Propulsion: 4 shafts
General Electric turbines
4 boiler
120,000 shp (89484 kW)
Speed: 33 kn (61 km/h)
Range: 10,500 nmi at 15 knots
(19446 km at 27.8 km/h)
Complement: 1,799 officers and enlisted
Armament:

Armor:

6 in (150 mm) Belt
8 in (200 mm) Turrets
3+12 in (89 mm) Deck
6+12 in (170 mm) Conning Tower

The Des Moines class cruisers were a group of U.S. Navy heavy cruisers, commissioned in 1948-1949. They were the last and the largest of the all-gun heavy cruisers. Derived from the Baltimore-class heavy cruisers, they were larger, had an improved machinery layout, and carried a new design of auto-loading, rapid-fire 8"/55 gun (the Mk16).[3][4][5] The improved Mk16 guns of the main battery were the first auto-loading 8" guns fielded by the US Navy, and allowed a much higher rate of fire than earlier designs, capable of sustaining 7 shots per minute per barrel, or about twice that of the Mk12s found on the Baltimore class.[4] The auto-loading mechanism could function at any elevation, giving even these large-caliber guns some anti-aircraft ability.[4] While the secondary battery of six twin 5"/38 Mk12 DP guns was essentially unchanged from the preceding Oregon City and Baltimore class cruisers, the Des Moines class carried a stronger battery of small-caliber anti-aircraft guns, including 12 twin 3-inch/50 Mk27 and later Mk33 guns, superior to the earlier ships' quad-mounted 40mm Bofors.[4]

Three ships of the class were completed: Des Moines (CA-134), Salem (CA-139), and Newport News (CA-148). The first two were decommissioned in 1959 and 1961, respectively, but Newport News remained in commission until 1975, having the distinction of being the last active all-gun cruiser in the U.S. Navy. Salem is a museum ship in Quincy, Massachusetts. Newport News was scrapped in 1993, and Des Moines was scrapped in 2006-2007. Dallas (CA-140) and eight other ships (CA-141 through CA-143 and CA-149 through CA-153) were cancelled at the end of World War II.[2][4]

Contents

Ships in class

See also

References

External links


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