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Depiction of the Devil as seen in the Codex Gigas.
.The Devil (Greek: διάβολος or diávolos = 'slanderer' or 'accuser'[1]) is believed in certain religions and cultures to be a powerful, supernatural entity that is the personification of evil and the enemy of God and humankind.^ If the devils were only personifications of evil what were the angels?
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Among the Greeks, the Titans were the enemies of the gods.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The Devil is commonly a supernatural entity which embodies evil.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC devilhappy.com [Source type: General]

The Devil is commonly associated with heretics, infidels, and other unbelievers. .The Abrahamic religions have variously regarded the Devil as a rebellious fallen angel or demon that tempts humans to sin or commit evil deeds.^ If the devils were only personifications of evil what were the angels?
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ He has a whole army of fallen angels , called demons, at his disposal.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ But let me ask the clergy a few questions: How did your Devil, who was at one time an angel of light, come to sin?
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

.Others regard the Devil as an allegory that represents a crisis of faith, individualism, free will, wisdom and enlightenment.^ Now, the question is: Did the author of this account believe in the existence of the Devil, or did he regard this Devil as a personification of evil, and did he intend that his account should be understood as an allegory, or as a poem, or as a myth.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

.In mainstream Christianity, God and the Devil are usually portrayed as fighting over the souls of humans, with the Devil seeking to lure people away from God and into Hell.^ We have no God to serve or fear,    No hell to shun, No devil with malicious leer.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ They will teach them to believe in the Devil; in hell in the prison of God; in the eternal dungeon, where the souls of men are to suffer forever.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In Egypt the devil was Set -- or, as usually called, Typhon -- and the good god was Osiris.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

.The Devil commands a force of evil angels, commonly known as demons.^ If the devils were only personifications of evil what were the angels?
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The Devil is commonly a supernatural entity which embodies evil.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC devilhappy.com [Source type: General]

^ These ideas about gods and devils often changed, because in the days of Socrates a demon was not a devil, but a guardian angel.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

[2] .The Hebrew Bible (or Old Testament) describes the Adversary (Ha-satan) as an angel who instigates tests upon humankind.^ Once upon a time there was an old widow who lived, with her three daughters, far away from the rest of the world, next to a mountain.
  • How the Devil Married Three Sisters 20 September 2009 13:41 UTC www.pitt.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ TWOT - 2252a; n m AV - Satan 19, adversary 7, withstand 1; 27 1) adversary, one who withstands 1a) adversary (in general - personal or national) 2) superhuman adversary 2a) Satan (as noun pr) .
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Maybe the most intriguing detail here is that the word adversary is, in Hebrew, satan , which means generally "adversary, enemy, foe."
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

[3][4] .Many other religions have a trickster or tempter figure that is similar to the Devil.^ Many reviewers believed its fighting engine was superior to other similar games.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC devilhappy.com [Source type: General]

^ Curiously enough some of these devils were made out of degraded gods, and, naturally enough, many devils were made out of the gods of other nations.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Gérard Damiano made many other movies besides Deep Throat and the Devil in Miss Jones.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC devilhappy.com [Source type: General]

.Modern conceptions of the Devil include the concept that it symbolizes humans' own lower nature or sinfulness.^ I admit that the devils as well as the gods were naturally produced -- the effect of nature upon the human brain.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

.People put the concept of the Devil to use in social and political conflicts, claiming that their opponents are influenced by the Devil or even willingly supporting the Devil.^ In Saturday’s second game, the Devils put a defensive stranglehold on the NV San Jose Vipers, limiting their opponent to few offensive chances.

^ Playing four teams they’ve never seen before, the Devils put together great team soccer against formidable opponents.

^ He will be supported (and even possessed for a time, as Judas was) by Satan the Devil, even though Satan is not the King of Babylon in Isaiah 14.
  • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

.The Devil has also been used to explain why others hold beliefs that are considered to be false and ungodly.^ False prophets are deceived and they deceive others with their own sincerely held beliefs.
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Why the Holy Ghost should hand Christ over to the tender mercies of the Devil is not explained.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Why would a decent God allow his worshipers to believe in devils, and by reason of that belief to persecute, torture and burn their fellow-men?
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

Contents

Religious accounts

Judaism

.In mainstream Judaism there is no concept of a devil like in mainstream Christianity or Islam.^ I do not believe like the Christadelphians that there is no such thing as Satan.
  • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

^ There was no other devil to tempt him.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In John there are no accounts of the casting out of devils by Christ or his apostles.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

.In Hebrew, the biblical word ha-satan (השָׂטָן) means "the adversary"[5] or the obstacle, or even "the prosecutor" (recognizing that God is viewed as the ultimate Judge).^ In other words, if a person does that, he has actually made himself subject to Satan because Satan is the god of this world!
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ But Satan knows this too and believes that, if he can undermine the trustworthiness of God and the validity of His Word, he can destroy the faith necessary for salvation .
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Satan sets his goal and then utilizes and exploits the most effective means, while avoiding all obstacles, to reach his diabolical end.

Hebrew Apocrypha

.The Apocrypha are religious writings which are not generally accepted as scripture by Judaism and many modern-day Protestant sects of Christianity.^ Yet many of this world's religious groups that call themselves Christian would have us believe that accepting the blood of Jesus Christ is the end of all of our problems.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

.In the Book of Wisdom, the devil is represented as the one who brought death into the world.^ There was brought unto Jesus one possessed with a devil, blind and dumb, and Jesus healed him.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ But let me ask the clergy a few questions: How did your Devil, who was at one time an angel of light, come to sin?
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ I want to go into one, and it concerns the subject of Satan the Devil.
  • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

[6]
.The 2nd Book of Enoch, also called the Slavonic Book of Enoch, contains references to a Watcher Grigori called Satanael.^ So there are many references to devils, and spirits of divination and of evil which I have not the time to call attention to; but, in the Book of Job, Satan, the Devil has a conversation with God.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

[7] It is a pseudepigraphic text of an uncertain date and unknown authorship. .The text describes Satanael as being the prince of the Grigori who was cast out of heaven[8] and an evil spirit who knew the difference between what was "righteous" and "sinful".[9] A similar story is found in the book of 1 Enoch; however, in that book, the leader of the Grigori is called Semjâzâ.^ Satan will be cast out of heaven with his angels.
  • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Satan the prince of the demons, the author of evil, persecuting good men, estranging mankind from God and enticing them to sin, afflicting them with diseases by means of demons who take possession of their bodies at his bidding.
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

^ There is a difference between the word king and prince when you really look at it.
  • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

In the apocryphal literature, Satan rules over a host of angels.[10] .Mastema, who induced God to test Abraham through the sacrifice of Isaac, is identical with Satan in both name and nature.^ We have been forgiven of our sins through the sacrifice of Jesus Christ on the cross so that we can live pure and guiltless lives before God, and not so that we can walk in sin with a clear conscience.
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Notice that when given permission by God , Satan is able to exercise tremendous destructive influence on nature, nations, and individuals.

^ Matthew chapter four verses one through eleven record the temptations that Satan used in his attempt to cause Jesus to break faith with God.
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

[11]
For the Chasidic Jews of the eighteenth century, Ha-satan was Baal Davar.[12] .The Book of Enoch contains references to Satariel, thought also to be Sataniel and Satan'el (etymology dating back to Babylonian origins).^ So there are many references to devils, and spirits of divination and of evil which I have not the time to call attention to; but, in the Book of Job, Satan, the Devil has a conversation with God.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

The similar spellings mirror that of his angelic brethren Michael, Raphael, Uriel and Gabriel, previous to his expulsion from Heaven.

Christianity

The Devil depicted in The Temptation of Christ, by Ary Scheffer, 1854.
.In mainstream Christianity the Devil is known as Satan and sometimes as Lucifer, although most scholars recognize the reference in Isaiah 14:12 to Lucifer, or the Morning Star, to be a reference to the Babylonian king.^ Isaiah 14:12 .
  • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The meaning of the word "star" is not actually in the name Lucifer, but rather it is because he is an angel that he was called the bright morning star , bright coming from the name Lucifer and star because he is an angel.
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The devil has other names such as Satan, Lucifer, Beelzebub, and Mephistopheles.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC devilhappy.com [Source type: General]

[13] .Many modern Christians consider the Devil to be an angel who, along with one-third of the angelic host (the demons) rebelled against God and has consequently been condemned to the Lake of Fire.^ As many adult film companies do in the modern world, Devils Film has a website.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC devilhappy.com [Source type: General]

^ The other side of the coin is that the beings who inspire, guide, direct, or motivate men not to get along with one another cannot get along with themselves either!
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Ezekiel calls him "the anointed cherub who covers," which means he was one of the chief angels whose wings covered God's throne in heaven.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

.He is described as hating all humanity, or more accurately creation, opposing God, spreading lies and wreaking havoc on the souls of mankind.^ This personage was the sum total of all that God could create by fiat and put into a living being.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ God is infinitely more beautiful and wise than Satan and all of us put together!
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

^ And it is all the more wonderful when we remember that the Holy Ghost was the third person in the Trinity and Christ the second, and that this Holy Ghost was, in fact, God, and that Christ also was, in fact, God, so that God led God into the wilderness to be tempted of the Devil.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

.Other Christians consider the devil in the Bible to refer figuratively to human sin and temptation and to any human system in opposition to God.^ Curiously enough some of these devils were made out of degraded gods, and, naturally enough, many devils were made out of the gods of other nations.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Nowhere are we given the right or privilege by God to make ourselves greater than or more important than God or other human beings.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ God's purposes with Peter were to instruct him, humble him, perhaps discipline him, and certainly to use him as an example to others of both human arrogance and the possibility of forgiveness and restoration.

.Satan is often identified as the serpent who convinced Eve to eat the forbidden fruit; thus, Satan has often been depicted as a serpent.^ The woman said to the serpent, "We may eat fruit from the trees in the garden, but God did say, 'You must not eat fruit from the tree that is in the middle of the garden, and you must not touch it, or you will die.'"
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Satan cunningly hides something else from Adam and Eve: His brand of freedom to establish standards and to choose creates tremendous diversity and thus a constant and wearying confusion.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The result of this conversation was that Eve ate the forbidden fruit and induced Adam to do the same.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

Though this identification is not present in the Adam and Eve narrative, this interpretation goes back at least as far as the time of the writing of the book of Revelation, which specifically identifies Satan as being the serpent (Rev. 20:2).
.In the Bible, the devil is identified with the "The dragon" and "the old serpent" in the Book of Revelation 12:9, 20:2 have also been identified with Satan, as have "the prince of this world" in the Book of John 12:31, 14:30; "the prince of the power of the air" also called Meririm, and "the spirit that now worketh in the children of disobedience" in the Book of Ephesians 2:2; and "the god of this world" in 2 Corinthians 4:4.[14].^ Jesus calls him the ruler of this world ( John 14:30 ).
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Revelation 12:3-4 ( Go to this verse :: Verse pop-up ) The dragon of verse 3 is identified as Satan in verse 9.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Every time we read of Satan the Devil, however, he is a serpent or a dragon.
  • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

.He is also identified as the dragon in the Book of Revelation (e.g.^ Revelation 12:3-4 ( Go to this verse :: Verse pop-up ) The dragon of verse 3 is identified as Satan in verse 9.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

[15]), and the tempter of the Gospels (e.g.[16]).
Beelzebub is originally the name of a Philistine god (more specifically a certain type of Baal, from Ba‘al Zebûb, lit. ."Lord of Flies") but is also used in the New Testament as a synonym for Satan.^ Beelzebub: Which means, Lord of the Flies, is an appropriate name for Satan as he is the lord of those that are dead spiritually, in other words he is the Lord of those that don't matter, that is, lord of the flies.
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In this passage people that opposed Jesus said that he drove out demons because he was their prince, but Jesus pointed out that this was wrong, it was Satan that was the lord of the flies and not him.
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

^ There are several reasons to conclude that the final petition in the Lord's prayer is a reference to Satan: (1) The use of the adjective "evil" ( poneros ) with the definite article "the" in Mt.

A corrupted version, "Belzeboub," appears in The Divine Comedy.
In other, non-mainstream, Christian beliefs (e.g. the beliefs of the .Christadelphians) the word "satan" in the Bible is not regarded as referring to a supernatural, personal being but to any 'adversary' and figuratively refers to human sin and temptation.^ In other words, if a person does that, he has actually made himself subject to Satan because Satan is the god of this world!
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Had the man and the woman in the Garden of Eden responded to Satan's temptations in the same way, then none of the curse of sin would have come upon them.
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

^ TWOT - 2252a; n m AV - Satan 19, adversary 7, withstand 1; 27 1) adversary, one who withstands 1a) adversary (in general - personal or national) 2) superhuman adversary 2a) Satan (as noun pr) .
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

[17]

Islam

.In Islam the Devil is referred to as Iblis (Arabic: Shaitan, a word referring to evil devil-like beings).^ Wesson eats in a Mexican restaurant in the Smith & Wesson album The Two Sombrheroes, and he feels like he's in Hell being poked by devils (p.
  • Index to Comic Art Collection: "Devil" to "Devilworlds" 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC comics.lib.msu.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ So there are many references to devils, and spirits of divination and of evil which I have not the time to call attention to; but, in the Book of Job, Satan, the Devil has a conversation with God.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ If he is the son of the morning, it is an astronomical reference that is being indicated, which it seems like, this King of Babylon is compared to the Day Star, the bright and morning star.
  • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

.According to the Qur'an, God created Iblis out of "smokeless fire" (along with all of the other jinn) and created man out of clay.^ Satan will really pull out all the stops to deceive as many as possible, especially the called sons of God.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Perhaps he knew God was eventually going to create man and give him the potential to enter into the God-Family.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ We know that in the Lake of Fire, God will destroy all of mankind that is unrighteous too.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

.The primary characteristic of the Devil, besides hubris, is that he has no power other than the power to cast evil suggestions into the heart of men and women.^ When Jesus sent his disciples forth on the great mission to convert the world, among other things he told them to heal the sick, to raise the dead and to cast out devils.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Millions of men and women were destroyed because they had sold themselves to the Devil.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ If we do so we will be in far less trouble than bringing all these assumptions that we have brought in from other areas into our minds.
  • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

.According to Muslim theology, Iblis was expelled from the grace of God when he disobeyed God by choosing not to pay homage to Adam, the father of all mankind.^ Satan motivated Adam and Eve, and subsequently all the rest of mankind, to separate themselves from God.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Of course, God makes all of this possible to bring about the end—so that all will work out according to His plan (see Revelation 17:17 ).
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ God is saying that if the man would remain "the child under his father's care" that all would be taken care of by the man's father.
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

He claimed to be superior to Adam, on the grounds that man was created of earth unlike himself. .As for the angels, they prostrated before Adam to show their homage and obedience to God.^ God is trying to get across that the angels have been defeated—cast down from heaven to the earth, as Revelation 12 shows.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Why did God create those angels, knowing that they would rebel?
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Far more important is they know God exists, and they tremble before Him.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

.However, Iblis, adamant in his view that man is inferior, and unlike angels was given the ability to choose, made a choice of not obeying God.^ On account of this, God cursed the earth with weeds and thorns and brambles, cursed man with toil, made woman a slave, and cursed maternity with pain and sorrow.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Having drawn away a third of the angels from God ( Revelation 12:4 ; Isaiah 14:12-14 ) and overcome Adam and Eve, he has wielded almost total control over man.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ However, he concealed from them that he would influence mankind in establishing those ways and standards so that he, the god of this world , would be sovereign and obeyed.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

.This caused him to be expelled by God, a fact that Iblis blamed on humanity.^ It was total hubris—overwhelming pride—that caused him to do this, because he was discontent with his position, and he presumptuously thought he could overthrow God.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ It is not the spirit of God , but a demon speaking through a human being, inspiring and motivating him.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Abraham had God as his spiritual Father, and Abraham did not attempt to kill the One who became Christ—in fact, He was hospitable to Him and honored Him.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

.Initially, the Devil was successful in deceiving Adam, but once his intentions became clear, Adam and Eve repented to God and were freed from their misdeeds and forgiven.^ Satan motivated Adam and Eve, and subsequently all the rest of mankind, to separate themselves from God.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Once per day an erinyes can attempt to summon 2d10 lemures or 1d4 bearded devils with a 50% chance of success.
  • Devil :: d20srd.org 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.d20srd.org [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

^ Adam and Eve chose to follow the faithless Satan rather than the faithful God.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

.God gave them a strong warning about Iblis and the fires of Hell and asked them and their children (humankind) to stay away from the deceptions of their senses caused by the Devil.^ As they saw the first-century apostasy coming, all the apostles warn about deceivers and urge the brethren to be certain of and stick to the doctrines of God.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ If you were to find a place where God is not, then you would be in Hell, or The Lake of Burning Fire.
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

^ God gave Satan permission to go down from heaven to earth and to tempt Job by taking away all his possessions, including his most precious, his children.
  • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

According to the verses of the Qur’an, the Devil's mission until the Qiyamah or Resurrection Day (yaum-ul-qiyama) is to deceive Adam's children (mankind). After that, he will be put into the fires of Hell along with those whom he has deceived. .The Devil is also referred to as one of the jinns, as they are all created from the smokeless fire.^ All this he knew when he created the Devil.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ They think that those nations created their own devils, precisely the same as they did their own gods.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ All the great commentators believed in the Devil as firmly as they did in God.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

.The Qur'an does not depict Iblis as the enemy of God, as God is supreme over all his creations and Iblis is just one of his creations.^ This personage was the sum total of all that God could create by fiat and put into a living being.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Sometimes, he will "bend" truth just enough to ensure it does not say quite what God said ("Has God indeed said .
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ This does not mean that all non-Christians are demonized, but it does imply that their unbelief and unrighteous behavior is stimulated and sustained by the enemy.

Iblis's single enemy is humanity. He intends to discourage humans from obeying God. .Thus, humankind is warned to struggle (jihad) against the mischiefs of the Satan and temptations he puts them in.^ Thus, the listener better have a good working knowledge of God, which returns us to II Corinthians 10:5 , where Paul warns that reasonings will exalt themselves against the knowledge of God.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ So in Ephesians we are warned not to give place to the Devil, and in the same book we are told: "Put on the whole armor of God, that ye may be able to stand against the wiles of the Devil."
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

.The ones who succeed in this are rewarded with Paradise (jannath ul firdaus), attainable only by righteous conduct.^ Sam can help–but he’s usually the only one who’s truly useful, and although he gets many more jobs (and privileges) as a result, things get to feeling lopsided.
  • Downloading the newest devil straight from China. | Raising Devils 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC raisingdevils.com [Source type: General]

^ To describe this enemy, Jesus uses the word diabolos : the accuser, deceiver, liar, and betrayer, one who is against all that is true and righteous.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ If people would only pay attention to this one verse right here I think that much of the confusion over the origin of Satan would be alleviated tremendously.
  • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

Bahá'í Faith

.In the Bahá'í Faith there is no existence of a malevolent superhuman entity such as the devil.^ Is there such a thing as a dumb and deaf devil?
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ I do not believe like the Christadelphians that there is no such thing as Satan.
  • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

^ There was no other devil to tempt him.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

[18] .Human beings are seen to have free will, and thus are seen to be able to either turn towards God and develop spiritual qualities, or instead be immersed in their own desires and thus commit wrongs; if people are immersed in their own desires, the Bahá'í writings sometimes use a metaphorical usage of satanic to describe their actions.^ Obviously, God is not speaking of a human being.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Without Satan, without Judas, not a single human being could have become an angel of light.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ People are reading, but not posting; I don't want to read my own posts - it's there for a reason - please use it.

[18] .The writings of Bahá'í Faith also state that the devil is also a metaphor for the "insistent self" or "lower self" which is a self-serving inclination within each individual.^ The plan is to add the All-State Red Devils & Lady Red Devils in a slide show or something like that to each sport's individual page.

^ Claunch stated that the 36 players for the game were selected but he is still awaiting the names of the 12 alternates for the game and expects to have these within a week and when he receives them the names of these 12 individuals will be released.

This tendency is often referred to in the Bahá'í writings as "the Evil One".[19][20]

Yazidism

An alternate name for the main deity in the tentatively Indo-European pantheon of the Yazidi, Malek Taus, is Shaitan.[21] .Rather than Satanic, however, Yazidism is better understood as a remnant of a pre-Islamic Middle Eastern religion, and/or a ghulat Sufi movement founded by Shaykh Adi.^ Adam and Eve chose to follow the faithless Satan rather than the faithful God.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Satan persuaded them to focus on what they could see rather than what God said.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The name Satan means "One Who Withstands" which means, A person that thinks that they know better than God does .
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

The connection with Satan, originally made by Muslim outsiders, attracted the interest of 19th-century European travelers and esoteric writers.

Neopaganism

Christian tradition has frequently identified pagan religions and witchcraft with the influence of Satan. In the Early Modern Period, the Church accused alleged witches of consorting and conspiring with Satan. Several modern conservative Christian writers, such as Jack Chick and James Dobson, have depicted today's neopagan and witchcraft religions as explicitly Satanic.
Few neopagan reconstructionist traditions recognize Satan or the Devil outright. .However, many neopagan groups worship some sort of Horned God, for example as a consort of the Great Goddess in Wicca.^ Curiously enough some of these devils were made out of degraded gods, and, naturally enough, many devils were made out of the gods of other nations.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The prince in the title means that he is some sort of leader among those that are separated from the Light, that is, God, and that is what he is.
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

^ All mankind worships and responds to him except for that small, elect group to whom God has revealed Himself.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

.These gods usually reflect mythological figures such as Cernunnos or Pan, and any similarity they may have to the Christian Devil seems to date back only to the 19th century, when a Christian reaction to Pan's growing importance in literature and art resulted in his image being translated to that of the Devil.^ So back of the good they put God; back of the evil, the Devil.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Why does God allow these devils to enjoy themselves at the expense of his ignorant children?
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Now, it will not do to say that these devils were diseases, because diseases could not talk, and diseases would not recognize Christ as the Son of God.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

[22]

New Age movement

.Participants in the New Age movement have widely varied views about Satan, the Devil, and so forth.^ We have, by reading Satan the Devil into that name, assumed that Satan is being talked about, and it is not the case at all when you look at the context.
  • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

^ They build up a teaching about Satan the Devil based upon these two chapters of Isaiah chapter 14 and Ezekiel chapter 28.
  • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

^ If this passage is talking about Satan the Devil, then Satan is a cherub next to the very throne of God, always at His side.
  • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

.In some forms of Esoteric Christianity Satan remains as a being of evil, or at least a metaphor for sin and materialism, but the most widespread tendency is to deny his existence altogether.^ So God told the man not to eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, (the tree clearly being a metaphor).
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

^ That claim, though, is misleading at the very least—and an outright lie at the most, depending on the material supporting such a claim.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Pride is a vine that produces a multitude of evil fruits—so many that some call it "the father of all sin ."
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

.Lucifer, on the other hand, in the original Roman sense of "light-bringer", occasionally appears in the literature of certain groups as a metaphorical figure quite distinct from Satan, and without any implications of evil.^ This Lucifer simply means light bringer.
  • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Without Satan, without Judas, not a single human being could have become an angel of light.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ On the other hand, if we use the English meaning of "destroy," God will destroy what Satan produces.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

.For example, Theosophy founder Madame Blavatsky named her journal Lucifer since she intended it to be a "bringer of light". Many New Age schools of thought follow a nondualistic philosophy that does not recognize a primal force for evil.^ Lucifer, "Light Bringer," rebelled against the laws of God, thus he rebelled against God Himself.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Isaiah 14:12-15 ( Go to this verse :: Verse pop-up ) "Lucifer" means "Light-Bringer" or "Day Star."
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

The Baphomet, adopted symbol of some Left-Hand Path systems, including Theistic Satanism.
Even when a dualistic model is followed, this is more often akin to the Chinese system of yin and yang, in which good and evil are explicitly not a complementary duality. .Schools of thought that do stress a spiritual war between good and evil or light and darkness include the philosophy of Rudolf Steiner, Agni Yoga, and the Church Universal and Triumphant.^ Ormuzd was the good -- the god -- Ahriman the evil -- the devil -- and between the god and the devil was waged a perpetual war.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Some of the Persians thought that the evil would finally triumph, but others insisted that the good would be the victor.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

Satanism

Some religions worship the Devil. .This can be in a polytheistic sense where "God", Satan, and others are all deities with Satan as the preferred patron; or it can be from a more monotheistic viewpoint, where God is regarded as a true god, but is nevertheless defied.^ Satan motivated Adam and Eve, and subsequently all the rest of mankind, to separate themselves from God.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ In other words, if a person does that, he has actually made himself subject to Satan because Satan is the god of this world!
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ The question that Job will face, the question we all face is this: "Is God worthy to be loved and deserving of our obedience for who he is, irrespective of all other considerations?"

.Some variants deny the existence of God and the Devil altogether, but still call themselves Satanists, such as Anton LaVey's Church Of Satan which sees Satan as a representation of the primal and natural state of mankind.^ Satan motivated Adam and Eve, and subsequently all the rest of mankind, to separate themselves from God.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Satan had said, I shall do such and such , and Jesus said, God said for me to do this and that .
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Why does God allow these devils to enjoy themselves at the expense of his ignorant children?
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

[23]
.Much "Satanic" lore does not originate from actual Satanists, but from Christians.^ In other words, if a person does that, he has actually made himself subject to Satan because Satan is the god of this world!
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ If people would only pay attention to this one verse right here I think that much of the confusion over the origin of Satan would be alleviated tremendously.
  • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

Best-known would be the medieval folklore and theology surrounding demons and witches. A more recent example is the Satanic ritual abuse scare of the 1980s – beginning with the memoir Michelle Remembers – which depicts Satanism as a vast (and unsubstantiated) conspiracy of elites with a predilection for child abuse and human sacrifice. .This genre regularly describes Satan as actually appearing in person in order to receive worship.^ In other words, if a person does that, he has actually made himself subject to Satan because Satan is the god of this world!
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

[citation needed]

Similar concepts in other religions

Zoroastrianism

In the Gathas, the oldest texts of the Zoroastrian Avesta, believed to have been composed by Zoroaster himself, the poet does not mention a manifest adversary. Ahura Mazda's Creation is "truth", asha. The "lie" (druj) is manifest only as decay or chaos, not an entity.
Later, in Zurvanism (Zurvanite Zoroastrianism), Ahura Mazda and the principle of evil, Angra Mainyu, are the "twin" offspring of Zurvan, 'Time'. No trace of Zurvanism exists after the 10th century.
Today, the Parsis of India largely accept the 19th century interpretation that Angra Mainyu is the 'Destructive Emanation' of Ahura Mazda. Instead of struggling against Mazda himself, Angra Mainyu battles Spenta Mainyu, Mazda's 'Creative Emanation.'

Hinduism

.In contrast to Christianity, Islam, and Zoroastrianism, Hinduism does not recognize any central evil force or entity such as the Devil opposing God.^ Why does God allow these devils to enjoy themselves at the expense of his ignorant children?
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Now, it will not do to say that these devils were diseases, because diseases could not talk, and diseases would not recognize Christ as the Son of God.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ This devil recognized Jesus and admitted that he was the Holy One of God.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

Hinduism does recognize that different beings (e.g., asuras) and entities can perform evil acts, under the temporary dominance of the guna of tamas, and cause wordly sufferings. .The Rajasic and Tamasic Gunas of Maya are considered especially close to the Abrahamic concept , the hellish parts of the Ultimate Delusion called "Prakriti". An embodiment of this is the concept of Advaita (non-dualism) where there is no good or evil but simply different levels of realization.^ About this there can be no honest difference.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ There is a difference between the word king and prince when you really look at it.
  • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Some of the forces work for what man calls good; some for what he calls evil.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

.On the other hand in Hinduism, which provides plenty of room for counterpoint, there is also the notion of dvaita (dualism) where there is interplay between good and evil tendencies.^ Ormuzd was the good -- the god -- Ahriman the evil -- the devil -- and between the god and the devil was waged a perpetual war.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Some of the Persians thought that the evil would finally triumph, but others insisted that the good would be the victor.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

[24] .A prominent asura is Rahu whose characteristics are similar to those of the Devil.^ From this it is evident that a distinction was made between those possessed with devils and those whose minds were affected and those who were afflicted with diseases.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

However, Hindus, and Vaishnavites in particular, believe that an avatar of Vishnu incarnates to defeat evil when evil reaches its greatest strength. .The concept of Guna and Karma also explain evil to a degree, rather than the influence of a devil.^ The result of this is that those who submit to him are made in the Devil's image, rather than God's.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

.To be more specific, Hindu philosophy defines that the only existing thing (Truth) is the Almighty God.^ Satan, conversely, seeks to persuade us to do our own thing and to usurp God's prerogative in defining right living.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Many beings attempt to pawn themselves off as gods, each of whom has a kind of " truth ," or better, a "philosophy of life."
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

So, all the asuric tendencies are inferior and mostly exist as illusions in the mind. Asuras are also different people in whom bad motivations and intentions (tamas) have temporarily outweighed the good ones (Sattva). Different beings like siddha, gandharva, yaksha etc. are considered beings unlike mankind, and in some ways superior to men.
.In Ayyavazhi, officially an offshoot of Hinduism prominent in Tamil Nadu (a southern state in India with Dravidian heritage), followers, unlike most other branches of Hinduism, believes in a Satan-like figure, Kroni.^ I do not believe like the Christadelphians that there is no such thing as Satan.
  • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

^ We are looking at a description, probably figurative, of Satan the Devil in the form of a dragon, a Tyrannosaurus Rex -like symbol of Satan.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ So intense are the pressures to which Satan is able to subject believers that the faith of even the most courageous may be found wanting.

Kroni, according to Ayyavazhi is the primordial manifestation of evil and manifests in various forms of evil, i.e., Ravana, Duryodhana, etc., in different ages or yugas. In response to such manifestation of evil, believers, in Ayya-Vazhi religion believe that God, as Vishnu manifests in His avatars such as Rama and Krishna to defeat evil. .Eventually, the Ekam with the spirit (the spirit taken by Narayana only for incarnating in the world) of Narayana incarnates in the world as Ayya Vaikundar to destroy the final manifestaion of Kroni, Kaliyan.^ Satan is a destroyer, and the spirit that emanates from him, that drives this world and produces sin, is a destroying spirit.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

.Kroni, the spirit of Kali Yuga is said to be omnipresent in this age and that is one of the reasons why followers of Ayya Vazhi, like most Hindus, believe that the current yuga, Kali Yuga is so degraded.^ In the Gospel of John we are told that John the Baptist said that he saw the Spirit descending from heaven like a dove, and that it abode upon Christ.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ One of his most marked characteristics is he liked to be "Number One."
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ That is one of the reasons why Satan is used, they say this is Satan.
  • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

Buddhism

.A devil-like figure in Buddhism is Mara.^ We are looking at a description, probably figurative, of Satan the Devil in the form of a dragon, a Tyrannosaurus Rex -like symbol of Satan.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

.He is a tempter, who also tempted Gautama Buddha by trying to seduce him with the vision of beautiful women who, in various legends, are often said to be Mara's daughters.^ If he was tempted, who tempted him?
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

Mara personifies unskillfulness, the "death" of the spiritual life. He tries to distract humans from practicing the spiritual life by making the mundane alluring or the negative seem positive. .Another interpretation of Mara is that he is the desires that are present in ones own mind preventing the person from seeing the truth.^ One friend might go into harms way and be killed because of his love for you, another might send you into harms way because they fear their own harm; which is the more valuable friend?
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

^ We can see from Jesus' prayer and from our own experience (and from the history of man) that mankind is not at one with God, yet that is God's aim.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ He stirs up hostility and suspicion in the person's mind concerning the competency and integrity of the person presenting the gospel.

So in a sense Mara is not an independent being but a part of one's own being that has to be defeated. In daily life of the Buddha the role of devil has been given to Devadatta.

Ancient Egypt

In the Ausarian drama we find that Ausar (Greek: Osiris) is chopped into 13 pieces by Set. Auset (Isis) collects all of his pieces save his phallus. .Horus, son of Ausar and Auset sets out to avenge the death and dismemberment of his father by confronting Set.^ In the morning the father, having heard the boys come in, confronted the younger son about his late night excursion.
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

.Horus is victorious over Set and Ausar, being brought back from the dead becomes lord of the underworld.^ She set the severed heads of her sisters in place and then with the magic water brought them back to life.
  • How the Devil Married Three Sisters 20 September 2009 13:41 UTC www.pitt.edu [Source type: Original source]

.It is this drama that gives us the cosmic conflict between good and evil, evil being embodied by Set.^ So God told the man not to eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, (the tree clearly being a metaphor).
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Ormuzd was the good -- the god -- Ahriman the evil -- the devil -- and between the god and the devil was waged a perpetual war.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ God gives us an occasional glimpse in His Word about how these evil forces are used by Him to influence the rulers of nations.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

This is not to say that Set was always seen as an evil character in Ancient Egyptian theology. .There are many times in Ancient Egyptian history where conflicts between different "houses" lead to the depreciation of one god relative to another.^ The Jews cultivated the science of Demonology, and at one time it was believed that there were nine kinds of demons: Beelzebub, prince of the false gods of the other nations; the Pythian Apollo, prince of liars; Belial, prince of mischief makers.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ God can tell you how many individual cells are in your body and the state of health of each and every one of them.
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Eventually (rather soon, I think) there will be no more Tin Tins to read, and one way or another, he’ll move on.
  • Downloading the newest devil straight from China. | Raising Devils 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC raisingdevils.com [Source type: General]

.As in most polytheistic faiths, the characters involved differentiate themselves from the Western tradition of a devil in that all the gods are closely related.^ Satan motivated Adam and Eve, and subsequently all the rest of mankind, to separate themselves from God.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Why does God allow these devils to enjoy themselves at the expense of his ignorant children?
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ There are countless self-help philosophies, self-improvement methods, and self-examination methodologies; all of which have nothing to do with faith in God.
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

.In this case, numerous historic texts suggest that Set is the Uncle or Brother of Horus and in the "defeat" of Set, we see another separation from the norm in the devouring/assimilation of Set into Horus with the result of Horus having depictions of both the falcon head and the (unknown animal) head of Set.^ The troll got angry, and picked her up, twisted her head off, and threw both head and body into the cellar.
  • How the Devil Married Three Sisters 20 September 2009 13:41 UTC www.pitt.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ So she went into the cleft to see what it was, but she had barely set foot inside, when she fell through a trapdoor, deep, deep down, into an underground cavern.
  • How the Devil Married Three Sisters 20 September 2009 13:41 UTC www.pitt.edu [Source type: Original source]

^ Then the troll got so angry that he picked her up, twisted her head off, and then threw both the head and body into the cellar.
  • How the Devil Married Three Sisters 20 September 2009 13:41 UTC www.pitt.edu [Source type: Original source]

This (like Buddhism) represents a dissolution of dichotomy.

World folklore

Depiction of the Devil interviewing Mayor Hall
In the Western Christian tradition, the Devil has entered popular folklore, particularly in his role as a trickster figure. .As such, he is found as a character in a wide number of traditional folktales and legends from Ireland, Newfoundland, Italy and the United Kingdom, where he often attempts to trick or outwit other characters.^ Because they are a kingdom divided against themselves, they cannot stand—they cannot get their act together because their character is such that they are always in competition with each other.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

.In some of these tales, the Devil is portrayed as more of a folk villain than as the personification of evil.^ If the devils were only personifications of evil what were the angels?
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Was the devil in this case a personification of evil?
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Was this Devil who tempted David a personification of evil, or was Jehovah a personification of the devilish?
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

The Devil also features prominently in a number of hagiographical tales, or tales of the saints such as the popular tale of St. Dunstan, many of which may fall outside the authorized religious canon. The Devil is also a recurring feature in tales explaining the etymology of geographical names, lending his name to natural formations such as The Devil's Chimney.

Other names

Demons

.In some religions and traditions, these titles are separate demons; others identify these names as guises of The Devil.^ This paper talks about that and also some other obscure things, such as why a woman takes her husband's name upon marriage and why homosexuality is wrong, (spiritually).
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

^ The prince in the title means that he is some sort of leader among those that are separated from the Light, that is, God, and that is what he is.
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

^ In Revelation 9:11 , he is called " Abaddon " and " Apollyon ," and both of these names, one Hebrew, the other Greek, mean "Destroyer."
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

.Even when thought of as individual demons, some are often thought of being under the Devil's direct control.^ Clara assumed control of the net, directing the Devils backline.

.This identifies only those thought of as the Devil; List of demons has a more general listing.^ It allowed the Devils to control the middle of the field, which kept the Lightning from generating many more chances in the first half.

Titles

These are titles that almost always refer to the Devil.
  • 666 or 616, the Number of the Beast
  • Angra Mainyu, Ahriman: "malign spirit", "unholy spirit"
  • Antichrist, the coming of the Devil to the mortal world in Christianity
  • Der Leibhaftige (German): "He Himself"[citation needed]
  • Diabolus, Diavolus (Greek): "downward flowing"
  • Iblis, the devil in Islam
  • Lord of the underworld / Lord of Hell / Lord of this World
  • Lucifer / The Morning Star (Greek and Roman): bringer of light, illuminator; the planet Venus, often portrayed as Satan's name before he fell
  • Leviathan
  • Mephistopheles, Mephisto (Greek): that, which avoids the light
  • Old Scratch, The Stranger, Old Nick: a colloquialism for the devil, as indicated by the name of the character in the story The Devil and Tom Walker
  • Old Hob
  • Prince of Darkness / Air
  • Satan / The Adversary, Accuser, Prosecutor
  • (The ancient/old/crooked/coiling) Serpent
  • Shaitan, an Arabic name for Satan
  • Kölski (Iceland)[25]
  • Voland (medieval France)
A list of liturgical names for the Devil may be found in Jeffrey Burton Russell, Lucifer, the Devil in the Middle Ages (Cornell University Press, 1986), p. 128, note 76 online.

God as the Devil

.Several religious authors throughout history have advanced the notion that the god of the Abrahamic Bible and its sequels is consistent in character with the Devil.^ Many of the main characters in the Bible have several if not many different names.
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

.They make the case that the Biblical God is a divine force that wreaks suffering, death, and destruction and that tempts or commands humanity into committing mayhem and genocide.^ Nowhere are we given the right or privilege by God to make ourselves greater than or more important than God or other human beings.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ (It is rumored that when the secret agents of God go on covert operations into enemy territory they bring along a suicide capsule filled with a small dose of pride just in case they get captured by the enemy.
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

^ After winning the Medina Fall Classic the week prior, Coach Brad and Coach Mike were forced to make due on a bet they made with the girls prior to the tournament.

These writings refer to the Biblical God variously as "a demiurgus", "an evil angel", "the devil god", "the Prince of Darkness", "the source of all evil", "a demon", "a cruel, wrathful, warlike tyrant", "Satan", "the devil", and "the first beast of the book of Revelation".
.Many of the authors criticize only Jehovah, the God of the Abrahamic scriptures (Tanakh), in contrast with the "true god" of the New Testament.^ In a way, Satan is saying, you say that the Scriptures are true, then throw yourself off this high place and see if God will do what he said he would do.
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

^ If the Devil does not exist -- if little devils do not enter the bodies of men -- the New Testament may be inspired, but it is not true.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ I admit that there are many good and beautiful passages in the Old and New Testament; that from the lips of Christ dropped many pearls of kindness -- of love.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

However, other authors apply their condemnation to the entire godhead of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.
.The authors assert their claims by reference to a number of passages in Biblical scripture describing actions of God that they say are evil or Devil-like.^ Now they say that devils were only personifications of evil.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ So back of the good they put God; back of the evil, the Devil.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

^ For God knows that when you eat of it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil.
  • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

Many of the authors have been severely chastised for their writings, and their followers killed.[citation needed]

See also

Footnotes

  1. ^ "devil", Encyclopædia Britannica. 2007. Encyclopædia Britannica Online. 29 June 2007 <http://www.britannica.com/eb/article-9030155>.
  2. ^ Revelation 12:9
  3. ^ 1Chronicles 21:1
  4. ^ Job 1:11
  5. ^ For example in Numbers 22:22 and Samuel 29:4 and other places, the word "adversary" appears in the translation, which in the original Hebrew is "ha-satan".
  6. ^ "But by the envy of the devil, death came into the world" - Book of Wisdom II. 24
  7. ^ 2 Enoch 18:3
  8. ^ "And I threw him out from the height with his angels, and he was flying in the air continuously above the bottomless" - 2 Enoch 29:4
  9. ^ "The devil is the evil spirit of the lower places, as a fugitive he made Sotona from the heavens as his name was Satanail, thus he became different from the angels, but his nature did not change his intelligence as far as his understanding of righteous and sinful things" - 2 Enoch 31:4
  10. ^ Martyrdom of Isaiah, 2:2; Vita Adæ et Evæ, 16)
  11. ^ Book of Jubilees, xvii. 18
  12. ^ The Dictionary of Angels" by Gustav Davidson, © 1967
  13. ^ See, for example, the entries in Nave's Topical Bible, the Holman Bible Dictionary and the Adam Clarke Commentary.
  14. ^ 2 Corinthians 2:2
  15. ^ Rev. 12:9
  16. ^ Mat. 4:1
  17. ^ "Do you Believe in a Devil? He is a saint.". http://www.christadelphia.org/pamphlet/devil.htm. Retrieved 2007-05-29. 
  18. ^ a b Smith, Peter (2000). "satan". A concise encyclopedia of the Bahá'í Faith. Oxford: Oneworld Publications. pp. 304. ISBN 1-85168-184-1. 
  19. ^ Bahá'u'lláh (1994) [1873-92]. "Tablet of the World". Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh Revealed After the Kitáb-i-Aqdas. Wilmette, Illinois, USA: Bahá'í Publishing Trust. pp. 87. ISBN 0877431744. http://reference.bahai.org/en/t/b/TB/tb-8.html#pg87. 
  20. ^ Shoghi Effendi quoted in Compilations (1983). Hornby, Helen (Ed.). ed. Lights of Guidance: A Bahá'í Reference File. Bahá'í Publishing Trust, New Delhi, India. pp. 513. ISBN 8185091463. http://bahai-library.com/index.php5?file=hornby_lights_guidance_2.html&chapter=4#n1738. 
  21. ^ Drower, E.S. The Peacock Angel. Being Some Account of Votaries of a Secret Cult and their Sanctuaries. London: John Murray, 1941.
  22. ^ Hutton, Ronald (1999). Triumph of the Moon. Oxford: Oxford UniverUniversity Press. pp. 46. ISBN. 
  23. ^ Church of Satan official statement of beliefs
  24. ^ Hindu Concept of God
  25. ^ http://visindavefur.hi.is

References

.
  • see also Satan for more titles
  • The Origin of Satan, by Elaine Pagels (Vintage Books, New York 1995) explores the development, the "demonization" of the character of Satan against the background of the bitter struggle between the early Church and the Synagogue to be the legitimate heir of ancient Hebrew religious tradition.^ New York : Warner Books, 1975.
    • Index to Comic Art Collection: "Devil" to "Devilworlds" 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC comics.lib.msu.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ New York : Pocket Books, 1998.
    • Index to Comic Art Collection: "Devil" to "Devilworlds" 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC comics.lib.msu.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    ^ New York : DC Comics, 1995.
    • Index to Comic Art Collection: "Devil" to "Devilworlds" 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC comics.lib.msu.edu [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    She discusses how Satan becomes a figure that reflects our own hatreds and prejudices, and the struggle between our loving selves and our fearful, combative selves.
  • The Old Enemy: Satan & the Combat Myth, by Neil Forsyth (Princeton, New Jersey, 1987) seeks to show how Satan emerged from ancient mythological traditions and is best understood not as a principle of evil, but as a narrative character in the context of "the Combat Myth". Forsyth tells the Devil's story from the Epic of Gilgamesh through to the writings of St. Augustine.
  • The Devil: Perceptions of Evil from Antiquity to Primitive Christianity, by Jeffrey Burton Russell (Meridian, New York 1977) is "a history of the personification of evil" which, to make things clear, he calls "the Devil". Accessible and engaging, full of photographs illustrating the text, this is the first of a four volume series on the history of the concept of the Devil. The following volumes are, Satan: The Early Christian Tradition, Lucifer: The Devil in the Middle Ages, and Mephistopheles: The Devil in the Modern World.
  • The Devil in Legend and Literature, by Maximilian Rudwin (Open Court, La Salle, Illinois, 1931, 1959) is a compendium of "the secular and sacred adventures of Satan."

External links


Quotes

Up to date as of January 14, 2010

From Wikiquote

Image47.jpg (163634875).jpg
.The Devil is the name given to a supernatural entity, who, in most Western religions, is the central embodiment of evil.^ The Devil is commonly a supernatural entity which embodies evil.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC devilhappy.com [Source type: General]

^ (Most of these names, as with "Lucifer", derive from supernatural figures from pre-Christian beliefs in Europe, who were changed into devils as the new faith took over.
  • Satan - Television Tropes & Idioms 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC tvtropes.org [Source type: General]

^ Because we’re actually most evil, rude and impatient to the ones we love, who love us back, and are stuck with us.
  • Downloading the newest devil straight from China. | Raising Devils 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC raisingdevils.com [Source type: General]

See also Satan.

Sourced

.
  • Don't you know there ain't no devil, there's just God when he's drunk.^ There is nothing that God doesn't know.
    • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Basically, just as 'god' cannot provide proof positive of existence, the devil is like wise limited.
    • Satan Stories in the Mormon Church 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.exmormon.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ For God knows that when you eat of it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil.
    • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
    • Tom Waits "Heartattack and Vine", Heartattack and Vine (1980)
  • The Devil wants your soul!^ You belong to your father, the devil, and you want to carry out your father's desire.
    • Satan's Strategy 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC logosresourcepages.org [Source type: Original source]
    • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

    ...fuck, when is that contest going to be over? .When do they calculate the souls in heaven and hell and go "we got a winner!"^ What does it mean to go to heaven or hell?
    • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Notice that Satan and his angels [devils] were not cast out of heaven to hell; they were cast out to the earth, which is where they are right now!
    • THE DEVIL, SATAN 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.pacinst.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Though he rules Hell, he doesn't seem to do much other than watch (with glee) the souls of the damned go about their superficial afterlives.
    • Satan - Television Tropes & Idioms 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC tvtropes.org [Source type: General]

    .
    • David Cross, from the "Shut Up, You Fucking Baby!" CD
  • The greatest trick the Devil ever pulled was convincing the world he didn't exist.^ They have instead listened to pastors and ministers who preach the propaganda which is preparing the world to accept the devil’s greatest counterfeit.
    • THE DEVIL, SATAN 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.pacinst.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If this is Satan the Devil, how in the world could he become ashes under peoples feet if he is a spirit being and not subject to the elements that you and I are?
    • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Here is a humorous analogy but true: If you take the smartest man (or woman) in the world and remove his (smart) brain, what you end up with is nothing.
    • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

  • A Warning: Please look for signs of possession before performing this rite. Signs include speaking in tongues, Hulk-like strength, and unusual knowledge. .
    • De Exorcisms (Exorcism Rite), approved by John Paul II, the pope, January 26, 1999
  • We may not pay Satan reverence, for that would be indiscreet, but we can at least respect his talents.^ Thus, the apostle says God allowed Satan to afflict him so that Paul would not venture beyond what he had been given.
    • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ If people would only pay attention to this one verse right here I think that much of the confusion over the origin of Satan would be alleviated tremendously.
    • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Also, Deuteronomy 13 confirms that some of these false prophets will be able to do miracles , which Paul confirms in II Thessalonians 2, and John confirms in Revelation 11.
    • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Mark Twain, "Concerning the Jews", Harper's Magazine (Sept. .1899)
  • And now I would ask a strange question: who is the most diligentest bishop and prelate in all England that passeth all the rest in doing his office?^ They answered all my questions and didn't hold back anything when they were telling me what would be expected of me if I wanted to be a Sun Devil."
    • Sun Devil Recruiting Page 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.cactusranch.com [Source type: General]

    ^ But let me ask the clergy a few questions: How did your Devil, who was at one time an angel of light, come to sin?
    • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ I had previously selected who I thought would be there, and had all of the teams, just a few of the first round match-ups are different than my prognostications.

    .I can tell for I know him who it is; I know him well.^ But all these things they will do to you for My name's sake, because they do not know Him who sent Me.
    • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In the same chapter John tells Christ that he saw one casting out devils in Christ's name who did not follow with them, and Jesus said: "Forbid him not."
    • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

    .But now I think I see you listening and hearkening that I should name him.^ He was about to untie the the sack, when the girl called out to him, "I can still see you!
    • How the Devil Married Three Sisters 20 September 2009 13:41 UTC www.pitt.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ For to you it has been granted on behalf of Christ, not only to believe in Him, but also to suffer for His sake, having the same conflict which you saw in me and now hear is in me.
    • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Take your radio to EHS Gym to see some of the best wrestling action in the region while you listen to the hoops sportscasts.

    .There is one that passeth all the other, and is the most diligent prelate and preacher in all England.^ This list is not complete, as there are missing years, but it's the most comprehensive listing of All-State Red Devil Football Players from 1946 to 2008 that I've found.

    ^ Clark said,  "I've got family out there and that was one of the big reasons I chose ASU over Wisconsin and a few other schools, but it was mainly down to ASU and Wisconsin lately."
    • Sun Devil Recruiting Page 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.cactusranch.com [Source type: General]

    ^ All the kings of the nations, even all of them, lie in glory [in sepulchers, like pyramids or other sepulchers] , every one in his own house [his own grave house, mausoleum] .
    • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

    .And will ye know who it is?^ In the nineteenth chapter certain vagabond Jews pronounced over those who had evil spirits the name of Jesus, and the evil spirits answered: "Jesus I know, and Paul I know, but who are ye?"
    • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "Yes, yes; who knows?
    • How the Devil Married Three Sisters 20 September 2009 13:41 UTC www.pitt.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .I will tell you: it is the devil.^ Johnny goads the devil, telling him ?I told you once you son of a gun I’m the best there’s ever been,?
    • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC devilhappy.com [Source type: General]

    .He is the most diligent preacher of all other; he is never out of his diocese; he is never from his cure; ye shall never find him unoccupied; he is ever in his parish; he keepeth residence at all times; ye shall never find him out of the way, call for him when you will he is ever at home; the diligentest preacher in all the realm; he is ever at his plough; no lording nor loitering can hinder him; he is ever applying his business, ye shall never find him idle, I warrant you.^ Carry it with you at all times.
    • How the Devil Married Three Sisters 20 September 2009 13:41 UTC www.pitt.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He answers him, "Even if I shall tell you, I shall get no relief."
    • How the Devil Married Three Sisters 20 September 2009 13:41 UTC www.pitt.edu [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "And the Beast Shall cause all, small and great, rich and poor, slave and free, to receive a Mark upon their Right hand or forehead and with out this Mark (666) No man can buy or sell."
    • SATAN'S RAPTURE, OFFICIAL SITE ESCAPE 666 BIBLEPROPHECY REVEALED 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.satansrapture.com [Source type: FILTERED WITH BAYES]

    .And his office is to hinder religion, to maintain superstition, to set up idolatry, to teach all kind of popery.^ They closed up the house and set it afire, and because no one could get out, they all perished in the flames.
    • How the Devil Married Three Sisters 20 September 2009 13:41 UTC www.pitt.edu [Source type: Original source]

    .He is ready as he can be wished for to set forth his plough; to devise as many ways as can be to deface and obscure God's glory...O that our prelates would be as diligent to sow the corn of good doctrine as Satan is to sow cockle and darnel.^ We all must overcome the world ( I John 5:4 ), our nature, and Satan to be granted salvation , and if we do, entrance to God's Kingdom is an absolute promise!
    • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In a way, Satan is saying, you say that the Scriptures are true, then throw yourself off this high place and see if God will do what he said he would do.
    • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ A core issue of the Bible is whether we submit to God's governance or try to form a government based on our own perception of what is good or what works.
    • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

    • Hugh Latimer's Sermon on the Plough 29 January, 1548. (G. E. Corrie (ed.), Sermons by Hugh Latimer, sometime Bishop of Worcester, Martyr, 1555 (Cambridge University Press, 1844), pp. 70-1.)
  • ."Then Jesus was led by the Spirit into the desert to be tempted by the devil.^ Matthew tells us that Jesus was led up of the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted of the Devil.
    • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Then Jesus was led by the Spirit into the desert to be tempted by the devil.
    • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We are told that Jesus was led by the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted of the Devil.
    • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

    .2After fasting forty days and forty nights, he was hungry.^ In the wilderness Jesus fasted forty days, and then the Devil asked him to turn stones into bread.
    • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

    The tempter came to him and said, "If you are the Son of God, tell these stones to become bread.- Matthew 4:1-3"
  • Wow! I like that, see? Because that's the way the devil does it. .Everytime you make an error, everytime you make a mistake and I mean it's nothing but a mistake; the first thing he says is 'if you are what you say you are', 'If you are a preacher', 'If you were a Christian'. That's the devil, everytime you hear it from somebody.^ He explains, "You are unable to hear what I say."
    • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ First off, a big Devils THANK YOU to Coach Brad and Carmon for hosting such a fantastic end of season party on Saturday.

    ^ If we want to say they represent Satan the Devil, we are stretching the meaning far beyond the limits of revelation in Scripture.
    • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Did you hear what I said?^ The woman said to the serpent, "We may eat fruit from the trees in the garden, but God did say, 'You must not eat fruit from the tree that is in the middle of the garden, and you must not touch it, or you will die.'"
    • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ "You of little faith," he said, "why did you doubt?
    • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He said to the woman, "Did God really say, 'You must not eat from any tree in the garden'?"
    • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Everytime you hear somebody make a suggestion like that, remember that's not them, that's the devil!^ Bender: You may have to make a metaphorical deal with the devil.
    • Satan - Television Tropes & Idioms 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC tvtropes.org [Source type: General]

    ^ Devil (or, if you like, the Red Guy ), Satan is the Big Bad of most varieties of Christianity (in Islam the corresponding figure is known as Shaitan and Iblis).
    • Satan - Television Tropes & Idioms 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC tvtropes.org [Source type: General]

    ^ (Posted on 2007-09-30 03:18:00 by Central 15 @ EHS 21 ) Always cool to hear from a former Red Devil stand-out like you Brendon.

    .And I don't want to go too much further without telling you this: Before the devil even opens his mouth you ought already know who you are.^ Satan will tell you what you want to hear.
    • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Don't you want a lot of money?
    • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Don't you want to be valued?
    • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

    .It won't shake you, it won't bother you, because you already know who you are!"^ Numbers 16:3 ( Go to this verse :: Verse pop-up ) This is an example of a person who is dissatisfied with what he has and stirs up others because of his ingratitude for what God had given him already.
    • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ This is vitally important because if we are to understand that Satan is the One Who Withstands , it is necessary to know what he is withstanding.
    • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ But all these things they will do to you for My name's sake, because they do not know Him who sent Me.
    • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

Unsourced

  • "And does evil like beauty,steal the soul by night?. And Satan himself as a beacon, come as an angel of light?" .Steve Sayles
  • Though Satan should never be given undue prominence, it is important that the place given to him in Scripture be realised.^ As far as I know the Bible never calls Satan the Prince of Darkness, but it is nonetheless a reasonably good name for him.
    • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Thus, the apostle says God allowed Satan to afflict him so that Paul would not venture beyond what he had been given.
    • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In a way, Satan is saying, you say that the Scriptures are true, then throw yourself off this high place and see if God will do what he said he would do.
    • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

    .No other individual, except the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit, is afforded so prominent a place in the Bible from its very beginning to its end, as the character whom we know as Satan, the Devil.^ However, for some reason the Jewish Satan figure (and all other Jewish devils) cannot conceal the appearance of his feet: that of goose-claws, or a cloven hoof.
    • Satan - Television Tropes & Idioms 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC tvtropes.org [Source type: General]

    ^ The devil has other names such as Satan, Lucifer, Beelzebub, and Mephistopheles.
    • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC devilhappy.com [Source type: General]

    ^ Whenever that beginning took place, Satan was sinning from that beginning.
    • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

    .Of no one else are we so minutely informed concerning his origin, his fall, his character and work, his influence, and his ultimate judgment and destiny.^ The original schedule called for a five game schedule, but one of the teams in the U11 group pulled out at the last minute.

    ^ In the original comic storyline Trigon was supposed to be Satan, no ifs ands or buts about it, but apparently the writers got concerned that the Moral Guardians would object.
    • Satan - Television Tropes & Idioms 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC tvtropes.org [Source type: General]

    ^ In one sense, no: my work is much less onerous or unpleasant than the average.

    .Heathen lands have been enveloped in the grossest darkness and basest superstitions and practices because they lack clear teachings concerning him which the scripture afford.^ The true church of God will have that truth, and they will understand that, yes, Satan is, he is powerful, but because of God, they do have power over him in that they can reject him and his deceptions.
    • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Then he started disfellowshipping people because they did not agree with him.
    • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Because they did not trust Him, their lack of faith put a barrier between themselves and God.
    • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

    .We need not be “ignorant of his devices.”
    • Duffield & Van Cleave
  • And lo, God said: Let there be Satan, so people don't blame everything on me, and let there be lawyers, so people don't blame everything on Satan.^ Satan had said, I shall do such and such , and Jesus said, God said for me to do this and that .
    • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ God said to Satan, look at my righteous servant Job.
    • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They tend to shy away from Bible study, concluding that they do not need it since God speaks directly to them, and if there is anything important, God will let them know.
    • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
  • Demons do not exist any more than gods do, being only the products of the psychic activity of man.^ John 17:20-22 ( Go to this verse :: Verse pop-up ) Salvation can easily and accurately be described as "being at one with God."
    • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Once again, human words and traditions are considered more trustworthy than God's.
    • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Now the serpent was more crafty than any of the wild animals the LORD God had made.
    • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

    .
  • Devils can be driven out of the heart by the touch of a hand on a hand, or a mouth on a mouth.^ What rays of glory would stream from his sightless sockets, and how the heart would long for the touch of his stilling hand!
    • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

    .
  • If the devil does not exist, and man has therefore created him, he has created him in his own image and likeness
  • It is wonderful how much time good people spend fighting the devil.^ If the Devil does not exist the Bible is not true.
    • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Most of their time was occupied in fighting devils.
    • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ How much does this matter?

    .If they would only expend the same amount of energy loving their fellow men, the devil would die in his own tracks of ennui.^ If you were of the world, the world would love its own.
    • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ They answered all my questions and didn't hold back anything when they were telling me what would be expected of me if I wanted to be a Sun Devil."
    • Sun Devil Recruiting Page 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.cactusranch.com [Source type: General]

    ^ The officials originally called the ball wide, but after querying the Devils keeper and checking the net they overruled their own call and awarded the Lightning a goal.

  • They said God was on high and he controlled the world and therefore we must pray against Satan.^ They knew that Satan was their king.
    • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Satan is entirely subject to God's control.
    • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ He will destroy the system of this world that is against God.
    • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

    .Well, if God controls the world, he controls Satan.^ Satan is entirely subject to God's control.
    • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ We all must overcome the world ( I John 5:4 ), our nature, and Satan to be granted salvation , and if we do, entrance to God's Kingdom is an absolute promise!
    • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

    ^ In other words, if a person does that, he has actually made himself subject to Satan because Satan is the god of this world!
    • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

    For me, religion was full of misstatements and reaches of logic that I just couldn't agree with.
  • This cumbersome concept that men call the beast; I will destroy it, my men need a feast. .I am the blasphemer, I make your kind heel; Bring forth Satan and cleave him with steel.^ God, who instructs you to save your life, or Satan who flatters you so that you might worship him; which is the one that loves you?
    • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ Satan says, yes, but if you take away his health, if you touch him personally, then is when he will curse you to your face.
    • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

    ^ It is easy to vilify Satan and point your finger at him and say that you aren't as bad as he is, but how does that help you?
    • SeekersTrove.com - Lucifer and Satan the Devil - Fundamental ConceptsArticle - Bible Study 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.seekerstrove.com [Source type: Original source]

    Worship God or the Devil... it's all the same. Religion is a haven for the weak and lame.
    • Gwar - Anti-Anti-Christ
  • If the Devil is an evil computer, who the hell programmed it? Who is the Dr. Frankestein of this abominable character?

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From Wikisource

The Devil
by Leo Tolstoy, translated by Louise and Aylmer Maude
1889 work, translated in 1911 by Louise and Aylmer Maude
But I say unto you , that every one that looketh on a woman to lust after her hath committed adultery with her already in his heart.
  And if thy right eye causeth thee to stumble, pluck it out, and cast it from thee: for it is profitable for thee that one of thy members should perish, and not thy whole body be cast into hell.
And if thy right hand causeth thee to stumble, cut it off, and cast it from thee: for it is profitable for thee that one of thymembers should perish, and not thy whole body go into hell. Matthew v. 28, 29, 30

Contents

I

A brilliant career lay before Eugene Iretnev. He had everything necessary to attain it: an admirable education at home, high honours when he graduated in law at Petersburg University, and connexions in the highest society through his recently deceased father; he had also already begun service in one of the Ministries under the protection of the minister. Moreover he had a fortune; even a large one, though insecure. His father had lived abroad and in Petersburg, allowing his sons, Eugene and Andrew (who was older than Eugene and in the Horse Guards), six thousand rubles a year each, while he himself and his wife spent a great deal. He only used to visit his estate for a couple of months in summer and did not concern himself with its direction, entrusting it all to an unscrupulous manager who also failed to attend to it, but in whom he had complete confidence. 
After the father's death, when the brothers began to divide the property, so many debts were discovered that their lawyer even advised them to refuse the inheritance and retain only an estate left them by their grandmother, which was valued at a hundred thousand rubles. But a neighbouring landed-proprietor who had done business with old Irtenev, that is to say, who had promissory notes from him and had come to Petersburg on that account, said that in spite of the debts they could straighten out affairs so as to retain a large fortune (it would only be necessary to sell the forest and some outlying land, retaining the rich Semenov estate with four thousand desyatins of black earth, the sugar factory, and two hundred desyatins of water-meadows) if one devoted oneself to the management of the estate, settled there, and farmed it wisely and economically. 
And so, having visited the estate in spring (his father had died in Lent), Eugene looked into everything, resolved to retire from the Civil Service, settle in the country with his mother, and undertake the management with the object of preserving the main estate. He arranged with his brother, with whom he was very friendly, that he would pay him either four thousand rubles a year, or a lump sum of eighty thousand, for which Andrew would hand over to him his share of his inheritance.
 
So he arranged matters and, having settled down with his mother in the big house, began managing the estate eagerly, yet cautiously.
 
It is generally supposed the Conservatives are usually old people, and that those in favour of change are the young. That is not quite correct. Usually Conservatives are young people: those who want to live but who do not think about how to live, and have not time to think, and therefore take as a model for themselves a way of life that they have seen.
 
Thus it was with Eugene. Having settled in the village, his aim and ideal was to restore the form of life that had existed, not in his father's time -- his father had been a bad manager -- but in his grandfather's. And now he tried to resurrect the general spirit of his grandfather's life -- in the house, the garden, and in the estate management -- of course with changes suited to the times -- everything on a large scale -- good order, method, and everybody satisfied. But to do this entailed much work. It was necessary to meet the demands of the creditors and the banks, and for that purpose to sell some land and arrange renewals of credit. It was also necessary to get money to carry on (partly by farming out land, and partly by hiring labour) the immense operations on the Semenov estate, with its four hundred desyatins of ploughland and its sugar factory, and to deal with the garden so that it should not seem to be neglected or in decay.
 
There was much work to do, but Eugene had plenty of strength - physical and mental. He was twenty-six, of medium height, strongly built, with muscles developed by gymnastics. He was fullblooded and his whole neck was very red, his teeth and lips were bright, and his hair soft and curly though not thick. His only physical defect was short-sightedness, which he had himself developed by using spectacles, so that he could not now do without a pince-nez, which had already formed a line on the bridge of his nose.
 
Such was his physically. For his spiritual portrait it might be said that the better people knew him the better they liked him. His mother had always loved him more than anyone else, and now after her husband's death she concentrated on him not only her whole affection but her whole life. Nor was it only his mother who so loved him. All his comrades at the high school and the university not merely liked him very much, but respected him. He had this effect on all who met him. It was impossible not to believe what he said, impossible to suspect any deception or falseness in one who had such an open, honest face and in particular such eyes.
 
In general his personality helped him much in his affairs. A creditor who would have refused another trusted him. The clerk, the village Elder, or a peasant, who would have played a dirty trick and cheated someone else, forgot to deceive under the pleasant impression of intercourse with this kindly, agreeable, and above all candid man.   It was the end of May. Eugene had somehow managed in town to get the vacant land freed from the mortgage, so as to sell it to a merchant, and had borrowed money from that same merchant to replenish his stock, that is to say, to procure horses, bulls, and carts, and in particular to begin to build a necessary farm-house. the matter had been arranged. The timber was being carted, the carpenters were already at work, and manure for the estate was being brought on eighty carts, but everything still hung by a thread.  

II

Amid these cares something came about which though unimportant tormented Eugene at the time. As a young man he had lived as all healthy young men live, that is, he had had relations with women of various kinds. He was not a libertine but neither, as he himself said, was he a monk. He only turned to this, however, in so far as was necessary for physical health and to have his mind free, as he used to say. This had begun when he was sixteen and had gone on satisfactorily -- in the sense that he had never given himself up to debauchery, never once been infatuated, and had never contracted a disease. At first he had a seamstress in Petersburg, then she got spoilt and he made other arrangements, and that side of his affairs was so well secured that it did not trouble him. 
But now he was living in the country for the second month and did not at all know what he was to do. Compulsory self-restraint was beginning to have a bad effect on him.   Must he really go to town for that purpose? And where to? How? That was the only thing that disturbed him; but as he was convinced that the thing was necessary and that he needed it, it really became a necessity, and he felt that he was not free and that his eyes involuntarily followed every young woman. 
He did not approve of having relations with a married woman or a maid in his own village. He knew by report that both his father and grandfather had been quite different in this matter from other landowners of that time. At home they had never had any entanglements with peasant-women, and he had decided that he would not do so either; but afterwards, feeling himself ever more and more under compulsion and imagining with horror what might happen to him in the neighbouring country town, and reflecting on the fact that the days of serfdom were now over, he decided that it might be done on the spot. Only it must be done so that no one should know of it, and not for the sake of debauchery but merely for health's sake -- as he said to himself. and when he had decided this he became still more restless. When talking to the village Elder, the peasants, or the carpenters, he involuntarily brought the conversation round to women, and when it turned to women he kept it on that theme. He noticed the women more and more.

III

To settle the matter in his own mind was one thing but to carry it out was another. To approach a woman himself was impossible. which one? Where? It must be done through someone else, but to whom should he speak about it?   He happened to go into a watchman's hut in the forest to get a drink of water. The watchman had been his father's huntsman, and Eugene Ivanich chatted with him, and the man began telling some strange tales of hunting sprees. It occurred to Eugene Ivanich that it would be convenient to arrange matters in this hut, or in the wood, only he did not know how to manage it and whether old Daniel would undertake the arrangement. "Perhaps he will be horrified at such a proposal and I shall have disgraced myself, but perhaps he will agree to it quite simply." So he thought while listening to Daniel's stories. Daniel was telling how once when they had been stopping at the hut of the sexton's wife in an outlying field, he had brought a woman for Fedor Zakharich Pryanishnikov. 
"It will be all right," thought Eugene. 
"Your father, may the kingdom of heaven be his, did not go in for nonsense of that kind." 
"It won't do," thought Eugene. But to test the matter he said: "How was it you engaged on such bad things?" 
"But what was there bad in it? She was glad, and Fedor Zakharich was satisfied, very satisfied. I got a ruble. Why, what was he to do? He too is a lively limb apparently, and drinks wine." 
"Yes, I may speak," thought Eugene, and at once proceeded to do so.   "And do you know, Daniel, I don't know how to endure it," -he felt himself going scarlet.   Daniel smiled. 
"I am not a monk -- I have been accustomed to it."
 
He felt that what he was saying was stupid, but was glad to see that Daniel approved.
 
"Why of course, you should have told me long ago. It can all be arranged," said he: "only tell me which one you want."
 
"Oh, it is really all the same to me. Of course not an ugly one, and she must be healthy."
 
"I understand!" said Daniel briefly. He reflected.
 
"Ah! There is a tasty morsel," he began. Again Eugene went red.
 
"A tasty morsel. See here, she was married last autumn." Daniel whispered -- "and he hasn't been able to do anything. Think what that is worth to one who wants it!"
 
Eugene even frowned with shame.
 
"No, no," he said. "I don't want that at all. I want, on the contrary (what could the contrary be?), on the contrary I only want that she should be healthy and that there should be as little fuss as possible -- a woman whose husband is away in the army or something of that kind."
 
"I know. It's Stepanida I must bring you. Her husband is away in town, just the same as a soldier. and she is a fine woman, and clean. You will be satisfied. As it is I was saying to her the other day -- you should go, but she..."
 
"Well then, when is it to be?"
 
"Tomorrow if you like. I shall be going to get some tobacco and I will call in, and at the dinner-hour come here, or to the bath- house behind the kitchen garden. There will be nobody about. Besides after dinner everybody takes a nap."
 
"All right then."
 
A terrible excitement seized Eugene as he rode home. "what will happen? What is a peasant woman like? Suppose it turns out that she is hideous, horrible? No, she is handsome," he told himself, remembering some he had been noticing. "But what shall I say? What shall I do?"
 
He was not himself all that day. Next day at noon he went to the forester's hut. Daniel stood at the door and silently and significantly nodded towards the wood. The blood rushed to Eugene's heart, he was conscious of it and went to the kitchen garden. No one was there. He went to the bath-house -- there was no one about, he looked in, came out, and suddenly heard the crackling of a breaking twig. He looked round -- and she was standing in the thicket beyond the little ravine. He rushed there across the ravine. There were nettles in it which he had not noticed. they stung him and, losing the pince-nez from his nose, he ran up the slope on the farther side. She stood there, in a white embroidered apron, a red-brown skirt, and a bright red kerchief, barefoot, fresh, firm, and handsome, and smiling shyly. "There is a path leading round -- you should have gone round," she said. "I came long ago, ever so long."
 
He went up to her and, looking her over, touched her.
 
A quarter of an hour later they separated; he found his pincenez, called in to see Daniel, and in reply to his question: "Are you satisfied, master?" gave him a ruble and went home.
 
He was satisfied. Only at first had he felt ashamed, then it had passed off. And everything had gone well. The best thing was that he now felt at ease, tranquil and vigorous. As for her, he had not even seen her thoroughly. He remembered that she was clean, fresh, not bad-looking, and simple, without any pretence. "Whose wife is she?" said he to himself. "Pechnikov's, Daniel said. What Pechnikov is that? There are two households of that name. Probably she is old Michael's daughter-in-law. Yes, that must be it. His son does live in Moscow. I'll ask Daniel about it some time."
 
From then onward that previously important drawback to country life -- enforced self-restraint -- was eliminated. Eugene's freedom of mind was no longer disturbed and he was able to attend freely to his affairs.
 
And the matter Eugene had undertaken was far from easy: before he had time to stop up one hole a new one would unexpectedly show itself, and it sometimes seemed to him that he would not be able to go through with it and that it would end in his having to sell the estate after all, which would mean that all his efforts would be wasted and that he had failed to accomplish what he had undertaken. That prospect disturbed him most of all.
 
All this time more and more debts of his father's unexpectedly came to light. It was evident that towards the end of his life he had borrowed right and left. At the time of the settlement in May, Eugene had thought he at least knew everything, but in the middle of the summer he suddenly received a letter from which it appeared that there was still a debt of twelve thousand rubles to the widow Esipova. There was no promissory note, but only an ordinary receipt which his lawyer told him could be disputed. But it did not enter Eugene's head to refuse to pay a debt of his father's merely because the document could be challenged. He only wanted to know for certain whether there had been such a debt.
 
"Mamma! who is Kaleriya Vladimirovna Esipova?" he asked his mother when they met as usual for dinner.
 
"Esipova? she was brought up by your grandfather. Why?"
 
Eugene told his mother about the letter.
 
"I wonder she is not ashamed to ask for it. Your father gave her so much!"
 
"But do we owe her this?"
 
"Well now, how shall I put it? It is not a debt. Papa, out of his unbounded kindness..."
 
"Yes, but did Papa consider it a debt?"
 
"I cannot say. I don't know. I only know it is hard enough for you without that."
 
Eugene saw that Mary Pavlovna did not know what to say, and was as it were sounding him.
 
"I see from what you say that it must be paid," said he. "I will go to see her tomorrow and have a chat, and see if it cannot be deferred."
 
"Ah, how sorry I am for you, but you know that will be best. Tell her she must wait," said mary Pavlovna, evidently tranquillized and proud of her son's decision.
 
Eugene's position was particularly hard because his mother, who was living with him, did not at all realize his position. She had been accustomed all her life long to live extravagantly that she could not even imagine to herself the position her son was in, that is to say, that today or tomorrow matters might shape themselves so that they would have nothing left and he would have to sell everything and live and support his mother on what salary he could earn, which at the very most would be tow thousand rubles. She did not understand that they could only save themselves from that position by cutting down expense in everything, and so she could not understand why Eugene was so careful about trifles, in expenditure on gardeners, coachmen, servants -- even on food. Also, like most widows, she nourished feelings of devotion to the memory of her departed spouse quite different from those she had felt for him while he lived, and she did not admit the thought that anything the departed had done or arranged could be wrong or could be altered.
 
Eugene by great efforts managed to keep up the garden and the conservatory with two gardeners, and the stables with two coachmen. And Mary Pavlovna naively thought that she was sacrificing herself for her son and doing all a mother could do, by not complaining of the food which the old man-cook prepared, of the fact that the
 
paths in the park were not all swept clean, and that instead of footmen they had only a boy.
 
So, too, concerning this new debt, in which Eugene saw an almost crushing blow to all his undertakings, Mary Pavlovna only saw an incident displaying Eugene's noble nature. Moreover she did not feel much anxiety about Eugene's position, because she was confident that he would make a brilliant marriage which would put everything right. And he could make a very brilliant marriage: she knew a dozen families who would be glad to give their daughters to him. And she wished to arrange the matter as soon as possible.
  IV
 
Eugene himself dreamt of marriage, but no in the same way as his mother. the idea of using marriage as a means of putting his affairs in order was repulsive to him. He wished to marry honourably, for love. He observed the girls whom he met and those he knew, and compared himself with them, but no decision had yet been taken. meanwhile, contrary to his expectations, his relations with Stepanida continued, and even acquired the character of a settled affair. Eugene was so far from debauchery, it was so hard for him secretly to do this thing which he felt to be bad, that he could not arrange these meetings himself and even after the first one hoped not to see Stepanida again; but it turned out that after some time the same restlessness (due he believed to that cause) again overcame him. And his restlessness this time was no longer impersonal, but suggested just those same bright, black eyes, and that deep voice, saying, "ever so long," that same scent of something fresh and strong, and that same full breast lifting the bib of her apron, and all this in that hazel and maple thicket, bathed in bright sunlight.
 
Though he felt ashamed he again approached Daniel. And again a rendezvous was fixed for midday in the wood. This time Eugene looked her over more carefully and everything about her seemed attractive. He tried talking to her and asked about her husband. He really was Michael's son and lived as a coachman in Moscow.
 
"Well, then, how is it you..." Eugene wanted to ask how it was she was untrue to him.
 
"What about `how is it'?" asked she. Evidently she was clever and quick-witted.
 
"Well, how is it you come to me?"
 
"There now," said she merrily. "I bet he goes on the spree there. Why shouldn't I?"
 
Evidently she was putting on an air of sauciness and assurance, and this seemed charming to Eugene. but all the same he did not himself fix a rendezvous with her. Even when she proposed that they should meet without the aid of Daniel, to whom she seemed not very well disposed, he did not consent. He hoped that this meeting would be the last. He like her. He thought such intercourse was necessary for him and that there was nothing bad about it, but in the depth of his soul there was a stricter judge who did not approve of it and hoped that this would be the last time, or if he did not hope that, at any rate did not wish to participate in arrangements to repeat it another time.
 
So the whole summer passed, during which they met a dozen times and always by Daniel's help. It happened once that she could not be there because her husband had come home, and Daniel proposed another woman, but Eugene refused with disgust. then the husband went away and the meetings continued as before, at first through Daniel, but afterwards he simply fixed the time and she came with another woman, Prokhovova -- as it would not do for a peasant-woman to go about alone.
 
Once at the very time fixed for the rendezvous a family came to call on Mary Pavlovna, with the very girl she wished Eugene to marry, and it was impossible for Eugene to get away. as soon as he could do so, he went out as though to the thrashing floor, and round by the path to their meeting place in the wood. She was not there, but at the accustomed spot everything within reach had been broken -- the black alder, the hazel-twigs, and even a young maple the thickness of a stake. She had waited, had become excited and angry, and had skittishly left him a remembrance. He waited and waited, and then went to Daniel to ask him to call her for tomorrow. She came and was just as usual.
 
So the summer passed. The meetings ere always arranged in the wood, and only once, when it grew towards autumn, in the shed that stood in her backyard.
 
It did not enter Eugene's head that these relations of his had any importance for him. About her he did not even think. He gave her money and nothing more. At first he did not know and did not think that the affair was known and that she was envied throughout the village, or that her relations took money from her and encouraged her, and that her conception of any sin in the matter had been quite obliterated by the influence of the money and her family's approval. It seemed to her that if people envied her, then what she was doing was good.
 
"It is simply necessary for my health," thought Eugene. "I grant it is not right, and though no one says anything, everybody, or many people, know of it. The woman who comes with her knows. And once she knows she is sure to have told others. But what's to be done? I am acting badly," thought Eugene, "but what's one to do? Anyhow it is not for long.
 
What chiefly disturbed Eugene was the thought of the husband. At first for some reason it seemed to him that the husband must be a poor sort, and this as it were partly justified his conduct. But he saw the husband and was struck by his appearance: he was a fine fellow and smartly dressed, in no way a worse man than himself, but surely better. At their next meeting he told her he had seen her husband and had been surprised to see that he was such a fine fellow.
 
"There's not another man like him in the village," said she proudly.
 
This surprised Eugene, and the thought of the husband tormented him still more after that. He happened to be at Daniel's one day and Daniel, having begun chatting said to him quite openly:
 
"And Michael asked me the other day: `Is it true that the master is living with my wife?' I said I did not know. `Anyway,' I said, 'better with the master than with a peasant.'"
 
"Well, and what did he say?"
 
"He said: `Wait a bit. I'll get to know and I'll give it her all the same.'"
 
"Yes, if the husband returned to live here I would give her up," thought Eugene.
 
But the husband lived in town and for the present their intercourse continued.
 
"When necessary I will break it off, and there will be nothing left of it," thought he.
 
And this seemed to him certain, especially as during the whole summer many different things occupied him very fully: the erection of the new farm-house, and the harvest and building, and above all meeting the debts and selling the wasteland. All these were affairs that completely absorbed him and on which he spent his thoughts when he lay down and when he got up. All that was real life. His intercourse -- he did not even call it connection -with Stepanida he paid no attention to. It is true that when the wish to see her arose it came with such strength that he could think of nothing else. But this did not last long. A meeting was arranged, and he again forgot her for a week or even for a month.
 
In autumn Eugene often rode to town, and there became friendly with the Annenskis. They had a daughter who had just finished the Institute. And then, to Mary Pavlovna's great grief, it happened that Eugene "cheapened himself," as she expressed it, by falling in love with Liza Annenskaya and proposing to her.
 
From that time his relations with Stepanida ceased.
  V
 
It is impossible to explain why Eugene chose Liza Annenskaya, as it is always impossible to explain why a man chooses this and not that woman. There were many reasons -- positive and negative. One reason was that she was not a very rich heiress such as his mother sought for him, another that she was naive and to be pitied in her relations with her mother, another that she was not a beauty who attracted general attention to herself, and yet she was not bad-looking. But the chief reason was that his acquaintance with her began at the time when he was ripe for marriage. He fell in love because he knew that he would marry.
 
Liza Annenskaya was a t first merely pleasing to Eugene, but when he decided to make her his wife his feelings for her became much stronger. He felt that he was in love.
 
Liza was tall, slender, and long. Everything about her was long; her face, and her nose (not prominently but downwards), and her fingers, and her feet. The colour of her face was very delicate, creamy white and delicately pink; she had long, soft, and curly, light-brown hair, and beautiful eyes, clear, mild, and confiding. Those eyes especially struck Eugene, and when he thought of Liza he always saw those clear, mild, confiding eyes.
 
Such was she physically; he knew nothing of her spiritually, but only saw those eyes. And those eyes seemed to tell him all he needed to know. The meaning of their expression was this: While still in the Institute, when she was fifteen, Liza used continually to fall in love with all the attractive men she met and was animated and happy only when she was in love. After leaving the Institute she continued to fall in love in just the same way with all the young men she met, and of course fell in love with Eugene as soon as she made his acquaintance. It was this being in love which gave her eyes that particular expression which so captivated Eugene. already that winter she had been in love with tow young men at one and the same time, and blushed and became excited not only when they entered the room but whenever their names were mentioned. But afterwards, when her mother hinted to her that Irtenev seemed to have serious intentions, her love for him increased so that she became almost indifferent to the two previous attractions, and when Irtenev began to come to their balls and parties and danced with her more than with others and evidently only wished to know whether she loved him, her love for him became painful. She dreamed of him in her sleep and seemed to see him when she was awake in a dark room, and everyone else vanished from her mind. But when he proposed and they were formally engaged, and when they had kissed one another and were a betrothed couple, then she had no thoughts but of him, no desire but to be with him, to love him, and to be loved by him. She was also proud of him and felt emotional about him and herself and her love, and quite melted and felt faint from love of him.
 
The more he got to know her the more he loved her. He had not at all expected to find such love, and it strengthened his own feeling more.
  VI
 
Towards spring he went to his estate at Semenovskoe to have a look at it and to give directions about the management, and especially about the house which was being done up for his wedding.
 
Mary Pavlovna was dissatisfied with her son's choice, not only because the match was not as brilliant as it might have been, but also because she did not like Varvara Alexeevna, his future mother-in-law. Whether she was good-natured or not she did not know and could not decide, but that she was not well-bred, not *comme il faut* -- "not a lady" as Mary Pavlovna said to herself -- she saw from their first acquaintance, and this distressed her; distressed her because she was accustomed to value breeding and knew that Eugene was sensitive to it, and she foresaw that he would suffer much annoyance on this account. But she liked the girl. Liked her chiefly because Eugene did. One could not help loving her, and Mary Pavlovna was quite sincerely ready to do so.
 
Eugene found his mother contented and in good spirits. She was getting everything straight in the house and preparing to go away herself as soon as he brought his young wife. Eugene persuaded her to stay for the time being, and the future remained undecided.
 
In the evening after tea Mary Pavlovna played patience as usual. Eugene sat by, helping her. This was the hour of their most intimate talks. Having finished one game and while preparing to begin another, she looked up at him and, with a little hesitation, began thus:
 
"I wanted to tell you, Jenya -- of course I do not know, but in general I wanted to suggest to you -- that before your wedding it is absolutely necessary to have finished with all your bachelor affairs so that nothing may disturb either you or your wife. God forbid that it should. You understand me?"
 
And indeed Eugene at once understood that Mary Pavlovna was hinting at his relations with Stepanida which had ended in the previous autumn, and that she attributed much more importance to those relations than they deserved, as solitary women always do. Eugene blushed, not from shame so much as from vexation that good- natured Mary Pavlovna was bothering -- out of affection no doubt, but still was bothering -- about matters that were not her business and that she did not and could not understand. He answered that there was nothing that needed concealment, and that he had always conducted himself so that there should be nothing to hinder his marrying.
 
"Well, dear, that is excellent. Only, Jenya...don't be vexed with me," said Mary Pavlovna, and broke off in confusion.
 
Eugene saw that she had not finished and had not said what she wanted to. And this was confirmed, when a little later she began to tell him how, in his absence, she had been asked to stand godmother at ... the Pechnikovs.
 
Eugene flushed again, not with vexation or shame this time, but with some strange consciousness of the importance of what was about to be told him -- an involuntary consciousness quite at variance with his conclusions. And what he expected happened. Mary Pavlovna, as if merely by way of conversation, mentioned that this year only boys were being born -- evidently a sign of a coming war. Both at the Vasins and the Pechnikovs the young wife had a first child -- at each house a boy. Mary Pavlovna wanted to say this casually, but she herself felt ashamed when she saw the colour mount to her son's face and saw him nervously removing, tapping, and replacing his pince-nez and hurriedly lighting a cigarette. She became silent. He too was silent and could not think how to break that silence. So they both understood that they had understood one another.
 
"Yes, the chief thing is that there should be justice and no favouritism in the village -- as under your grandfather."
 
"Mamma," said Eugene suddenly, "I know why you are saying this. You have no need to be disturbed. My future family life is so sacred to me that I should not infringe it in any case. and as to what occurred in my bachelor days, that is quite ended. I never formed any union and on one has any claims on me."
 
"Well, I am glad," said his mother. "I know how noble your feelings are."
 
Eugene accepted his mother's words as a tribute due to him, and did not reply.
 
Next day he drove to town thinking of his fianc? and of anything in the world except of Stepanida. but, as if purposely to remind him, on approaching the church he met people walking and driving back from it. He met old Matvey with Simon, some lads and girls, and then two women, one elderly, the other, who seemed familiar, smartly dressed and wearing a bright-red kerchief. This woman was walking lightly and boldly, carrying a child in her arms. He came up to them, and the elder woman bowed, stopping in the old- fashioned way, but the young woman with the child only bent her
 
head, and from under the kerchief gleamed familiar, merry, smiling eyes.
 
Yes, this was she, but all that was over and it was no use looking at her: "and the child may be mine," flashed through his mind. No, what nonsense! There was her husband, she used to see him. He did not even consider the matter further, so settled in his mind was it that it had been necessary for his health -- he had paid her money and there was no more to be said; there was, there had been, and there could be, no question of any union between them. It was not that he stifled the voice of conscience, no -his conscience simply said nothing to him. And he thought no more about her after the conversation with his mother and this meeting. Nor did he meet her again.
 
Eugene was married in town the week after Easter, and left at once with his young wife for his country estate. The house had been arranged as usual for a young couple. Mary Pavlovna wished to leave, but Eugene begged her to remain, and Liza still more strongly, and she only moved into a detached wing of the house.
 
And so a new life began for Eugene.
  VII
 
The first year of his marriage was a hard one for Eugene. It was hard because affairs he had managed to put off during the time of his courtship now, after his marriage, all came upon him at once.
 
To escape from debts was impossible. An outlying part of the estate was sold and the most pressing obligations met, but others remained, and he had no money. The estate yielded a good revenue, but he had had to send payments to his brother and to spend on his own marriage, so that there was no ready money and the factory could not carry on and would have to be closed down. The only way of escape was to use his wife's money; and Liza, having realized her husband's position, insisted on this herself. Eugene agreed, but only on condition that he should give her a mortgage on half his estate, which he did. Of course this was done not for his wife's sake, who felt offended at it, but to appease his mother- in-law.
 
These affairs with various fluctuations of success and failure helped to poison Eugene's life that first year. Another thing was his wife's ill-health. That same first year, seven months after their marriage, a misfortune befell Liza. She was driving out to meet her husband on his return from town, and the quiet horse became rather playful and she was frightened and jumped out. Her jump was comparatively fortunate -- she might have been caught by the wheel -- but she was pregnant, and that same night the pains began and she had a miscarriage from which she was long in recovering. The loss of the expected child and his wife's illness, together with the disorder in his affairs, and above all the presence of his mother-in-law, who arrived as soon as Liza fell ill -- all this together made the year still harder for Eugene.
 
But notwithstanding these difficult circumstances, towards the end of the first year Eugene felt very well. First of all his cherished hope of restoring his fallen fortune and renewing his grandfather's way of life in a new form, was approaching accomplishment, though slowly and with difficulty. There was no longer any question of having to sell the whole estate to meet the debts. The chief estate, thought transferred to his wife's name, was saved, and if only the beet crop succeeded and the price kept up, by next year his position of want and stress might be replaced by one of complete prosperity. That was one thing.
 
Another was that however much he had expected from his wife, he had never expected to find in her what he actually found. He found not what he had expected, but something much better. Raptures of love -- though he tried to produce them -- did not take place or were very slight, but he discovered something quite different, namely that he was not merely more cheerful and happier but that it had become easier to live. He did not know why this should be so, but it was.
 
And it was so because immediately after marriage his wife decided that Eugene Irtenev was superior to anyone else in the world: wiser, purer, and nobler than they, and that therefore it was right for everyone to serve him and please him; but that as it was impossible to make everyone do this, she must do it herself to the limit of her strength. And she did; directing all her strength of mind towards learning and guessing what he liked, and then doing just that thing, whatever it was and however difficult it might be.
 
She had the gift which furnishes the chief delight of intercourse with a loving woman: thanks to her love of her husband she penetrated into his soul. She knew his every state and his every shade of feeling -- better it seemed to him than he himself - and she behaved correspondingly and therefore never hurt his feelings, but always lessened his distresses and strengthened his joys. And she understood not only his feelings but also his joys. Things quite foreign to her -- concerning the farming, the factory, or the appraisement of others -- she immediately understood so that she could not merely converse with him, but could often, as he himself said, be a useful and irreplaceable counselor. She regarded affairs and people and everything in the world only though his eyes. She loved her mother, but having seen that Eugene disliked his mother-in-law's interference in their life she immediately took her husband's side, and did so with such decision that he had to restrain her.
 
Besides all this she had very good taste, much tact, and above all she had repose. All that she did, she did unnoticed; only the results of what she did were observable, namely, that always and in everything there was cleanliness, order, and elegance. Liza had at once understood in what her husband's ideal of life consisted, and she tried to attain, and in the arrangement and order of the house did attain, what he wanted. Children it is true were lacking, but there was hope of that also. In winter she went to Petersburg to see a specialist and he assured them that she was quite well and could have children.
 
And this desire was accomplished. By the end of the year she was again pregnant.
 
The one thing that threatened, not to say poisoned, their happiness was her jealousy -- a jealousy she restrained and did not exhibit, but from which she often suffered. Not only might Eugene not love any other woman -- because there was not a woman on earth worthy of him (as to whether she herself was worthy or not she never asked herself), -- but not a single woman might therefore dare to love him.
  VIII
 
This was how they lived: he rose early, as he always had done, and went to see to the farm or the factory where work was going on, or sometimes to the fields. Towards ten o'clock he would come back for his coffee, which they had on the veranda: Mary Pavlovna, an uncle who lived with them, and Liza. After a conversation which was often very animated while they drank their coffee, they dispersed till dinner-time. At two o'clock they dined and then went for a walk or a drive. In the evening when he returned from the office they drank their evening tea and sometimes he read aloud while she worked, or when there were guests they had music or conversation. When he went away on business he wrote to his wife and received letters from her every day. Sometimes she accompanied him, and then they were particularly merry. On his name-day and on her guests assembled, and it pleased him to see how well she managed to arrange things so that everybody enjoyed coming. He saw and heard that they all admired her -- the young, agreeable hostess -- and he loved her still more for this.
 
All went excellently. She bore her pregnancy easily and, thought they were afraid, they both began making plans as to how they would bring the child up. The system of education and the arrangements were all decided by Eugene, and her only wish was to carry out his desires obediently. Eugene on his part read up medical works and intended to bring the child up according to all the precepts of science. She of course agreed to everything and made preparations, making warm and also cool "envelopes", and preparing a cradle. Thus the second year of their marriage arrived and the second spring.
  IX
 
It was just before Trinity Sunday. Liza was in her fifth month, and though careful she was still brisk and active. Both his mother and hers were living in the house, but under the pretext of watching and safeguarding her only upset her by their tiffs. Eugene was specially engrossed with a new experiment for the cultivation of sugar-beet on a large scale.
 
Just before Trinity Liza decided it was necessary to have a thorough house-cleaning as it had not been done since Easter, and she hired two women by the day to help the servants wash the floors and windows, beat the furniture and the carpets, and put covers on them. These women came early in the morning, heated the coppers, and set to work. One of the two was Stepanida, who had just weaned her baby boy and had begged for the job of washing the floors through the office-clerk -- whom she now carried on with. She wanted to have a good look at the new mistress. Stepanida was living by herself as formerly, her husband being away, and she was up to tricks as she had formerly been first with old Daniel (who had once caught her taking some logs of firewood), afterwards with the master, and now with the young clerk. She was not concerning herself any longer about her master. "He has a wife now," she thought. But it would be good to have a look at the lady and at her establishment: folk said it was well arranged.
 
Eugene had not seen her since he had met her with the child. Having a baby to attend to she had not been going out to work, and he seldom walked through the village. that morning, on the eve of Trinity Sunday, he got up at five o'clock and rode to the fallow land which was to sprinkled with phosphates, and had left the house before the women were about, and while they were still engaged lighting the copper fires.
 
He returned to breakfast merry, contented, and hungry; dismounting from his mare at the gate and handing her over to the gardener. Flicking the high grass with his whip and repeating a phrase he had just uttered, as one often does, he walked towards the house. The phrase was: "phosphates justify" -- what or to whom, he neither knew nor reflected.
 
They were beating a carpet on the grass. The furniture had been brought out.
 
"There now! What a house-cleaning Liza has undertaken! ... Phosphates justify....What a manageress she is! Yes, a manageress," said he to himself, vividly imagining her in her white wrapper and with her smiling joyful face, as it nearly always was when he looked at her. "Yes, I must change my boots, or else `phosphates justify', that is, smell of manure, and the manageress in such a condition. Why `in such a condition'? Because a new little Irtenev is growing there inside her," he thought. "Yes, phosphates justify," and smiling at his thoughts he put his hand to the door of his room.
 
But he had not time to push the door before it opened of itself and he came face to face with a woman coming towards him carrying a pail, barefoot and with sleeves turned up high. He stepped aside to let her pass and she too stepped aside, adjusting her kerchief with a wet hand.
 
"Go on, go on, I won't go in, if you ... " began Eugene and suddenly stopped, recognizing her.
 
She glanced merrily at him with smiling eyes, and pulling down her skirt went out at the door.
 
"What nonsense!...It is impossible," said Eugene to himself, frowning and waving his hand as though to get rid of a fly, displeased at having noticed her. He was vexed that he had noticed her and yet he could not take his eyes from her strong body, swayed by her agile strides, from her bare feet, or from her arms and shoulders, and the pleasing folds of her shirt and the handsome skirt tucked up high above her white calves.
 
"But why am I looking?" said he to himself, lowering his eyes so as not to see her. "And anyhow I must go in to get some other boots." and he turned back to go into his own room, but had not gone five steps before he again glanced round to have another look at her without knowing why or wherefore. She was just going round the corner and also glanced at him.
 
"Ah, what am I doing!" said he to himself. "She may think...It is even certain that she already does think..."
 
He entered his damp room. another woman, an old and skinny one, was there, and was still washing it. Eugene passed on tiptoe across the floor, wet with dirty water, to the wall where his boots stood, and he was about to leave the room when the woman herself went out.
 
"This one has gone and the other, Stepanida, will come here alone," someone within him began to reflect.
 
"My God, what am I thinking of and what am I doing!" He seized his boots and ran out with them into the hall, put them on there, brushed himself, and went out onto the veranda where both the mammas were already drinking coffee. Liza had evidently been expecting him and came onto the veranda through another door at the same time.
 
"My God! If she, who considers me so honourable, pure, and innocent -- if she only knew!" -- thought he.
 
Liza as usual met him with shining face. But today somehow she seemed to him particularly pale, yellow, long, and weak.
  X
 
During coffee, as often happened, a peculiarly feminine kind of conversation went on which had no logical sequence but which evidently was connected in some way for it went on uninterruptedly. The two old ladies were pin-pricking one another, and Liza was skillfully manoeuvring between them.
 
"I am so vexed that we had not finished washing your room before you got back," she said to her husband. "But I do so want to get everything arranged."
 
"Well, did you sleep well after I got up?"
 
"Yes, I slept well and I fell well."
 
"How can a woman be well in her condition during this intolerable heat, when her windows face the sun," said Varvara Alexeevna, her mother. "And they have no venetian-blinds or awnings. I always had awnings."
 
"But you know we are in the shade after ten o'clock," said Mary Pavlovna.
 
"That's what causes fever; it comes of dampness," said Varvara Alexeevna, not noticing that what she was saying did not agree with what she had just said. "My doctor always says that it is impossible to diagnose an illness unless one knows the patient. and he certainly knows, for he is the leading physician and we pay him a hundred rubles a visit. My late husband did not believe in doctors, but he did not grudge me anything."
 
"How can a man grudge anything to a woman when perhaps her
 
life and the child's depend..."
 
"Yes, when she has means a wife need not depend on her husband. A good wife submits to her husband," said Varvara Alexeevna -- "only Liza is too weak after her illness."
 
"Oh no, mamma, I feel quite well. But why have they not brought you any boiled cream?"
 
"I don't want any. I can do with raw cream."
 
"I offered some to Varvara Alexeevna, but she declined," said Mary Pavlovna, as if justifying herself.
 
"No, I don't want any today." and as if to terminate an unpleasant conversation and yield magnanimously, Varvara Alexeevna turned to Eugene and said: "Well, and have you sprinkled the phosphates?"
 
Liza ran to fetch the cream.
 
"But I don't want it. I don't want it."
 
"Liza, Liza, go gently," said Mary Pavlovna. "Such rapid movements do her harm."
 
"Nothing does harm if one's mind is at peace," said Varvara Alexeevna as if referring to something, though she knew that there was nothing her words could refer to.
 
Liza returned with the cream and Eugene drank his coffee and listened morosely. He was accustomed to these conversations, but today he was particularly annoyed by its lack of sense. He wanted to think over what had happened to him but this chatter disturbed him. Having finished her coffee Varvara Alexeevna went away in a bad humour. Liza, Eugene, and Mary Pavlovna stayed behind, and their conversation was simple and pleasant. But Liza, being sensitive, at once noticed that something was tormenting Eugene, and she asked him whether anything unpleasant had happened. He was not prepared for this question and hesitated a little before replying that there had been nothing. This reply made Liza think all the more. That something was tormenting him, and greatly tormenting, was as evident to her as that a fly had fallen into the milk, yet he would not speak of it. What could it be?
  XI
 
After breakfast they all dispersed. Eugene as usual went to his study, but instead of beginning to read or write his letters, he sat smoking one cigarette after another and thinking. He was terribly surprised and disturbed by the unexpected recrudescence within him of the bad feeling from which he had thought himself free since his marriage. Since then he had not once experienced that feeling, either for her -- the woman he had known -- or for any other woman except his wife. He had often felt glad of this emancipation, and now suddenly a chance meeting, seemingly so unimportant, revealed to him the fact that he was not free. What now tormented him was not that he was yielding to that feeling and desired her -- he did not dream of so doing -- but that the feeling was awake within him and he had to be on his guard against it. He had not doubt but that he would suppress it.
 
He had a letter to answer and a paper to write, and sat down at his writing table and began to work. Having finished it and quite forgotten what had disturbed him, he went out to go to the stables. And again as ill-luck would have it, either by unfortunate chance or intentionally, as soon as he stepped from the porch a red skirt and a red kerchief appeared from round the corner, and she went past him swinging her arms and swaying her body. She not only went past him, but on passing him ran, as if playfully, to overtake her fellow-servant.
 
Again the bright midday, the nettles, the back of Daniel's hut, and in the shade of the plant-trees her smiling face biting some leaves, rose in his imagination.
 
"No, it is impossible to let matters continue so," he said to himself, and waiting till the women had passed out of sight he went to the office.
 
It was just the dinner-hour and he hoped to find the steward still there, and so it happened. The steward was just waking up from his after-dinner nap, and stretching himself and yawning was standing in the office, looking at the herdsman who was telling him something.
 
"Vasili Nikolaich!" said Eugene to the steward.
 
"What is your pleasure?"
 
"Just finish what you are saying."
 
"Aren't you going to bring it in?" said Vasili Nikolaich to the herdsman.
 
"It's heavy, Vasili Nikolaich."
 
"What is it?" asked Eugene.
 
"Why, a cow has calved in the meadow. Well, all right, I'll order them to harness a horse at once. Tell Nicholas Lysukh to get out the dray cart." The herdsman went out.
 
"Do you know," began Eugene, flushing and conscious that he was doing so, "do you know, Vasili Nikolaich, while I was a bachelor I went off the track a bit....You may have heard..."
 
Vasili Nikolaich, evidently sorry for his master, said with smiling eyes: "Is it about Stepanida?"
 
"Why, yes. Look here. Please, please do not engage her to help in the house. You understand, it is very awkward for me..." "Yes, it must have been Vanya the clerk who arranged it." "Yes, please...and hadn't the rest of the phosphate better be strewn?" said Eugene, to hide his confusion.
 
"Yes, I am just going to see to it."
 
So the matter ended, and Eugene calmed down, hoping that as he had lived for a year without seeing her, so things would go on now. "Besides, Vasili Nikolaich will speak to Ivan the clerk; Ivan will speak to her, and she will understand that I don't want it," said Eugene to himself, and he was glad he had forced himself to speak to Vasili Nikolaich, hard as it had been to do so.
 
"Yes, it is better, much better, than that feeling of doubt, that feeling of shame." He shuddered at the mere remembrance of his sin in thought.
  XII
 
The moral effort he had made to overcome his shame and speak to Vasili Nikolaich tranquillized Eugene. It seemed to him that the matter was all over now. Liza at once noticed that he was quite calm, and even happier than usual. "No doubt he was upset by our mothers pin-pricking one another. It really is disagreeable, especially for him who is so sensitive and noble, always to hear such unfriendly and ill-mannered insinuations," thought she.
 
The next day was Trinity Sunday. It was a beautiful day, and the peasant-women, on their way into the woods to plait wreaths, came, according to custom, to the landowner's home and began to sing and dance. Mary Pavlovna and Varvara Alexeevna came out onto the porch in smart clothes, carrying sunshades, and went up to the ring of singers. With them, in a jacket of Chinese silk, came out the uncle, a flabby libertine and drunkard, who was living that summer with Eugene.
 
As usual there was a bright, many-coloured ring of young women and girls, the centre of everything, and around these from different sides like attendant planets that had detached themselves and were circling round, went girls hand in hand, rustling in their new print gowns; young lads giggling and running backwards and forwards after one another; full-grown lads in dark blue or black coats and caps and with red shirts, who unceasingly spat out sunflower-seed shells; and the domestic servants or other outsiders watching the dance-circle from aside. Both the old ladies went close up to the ring, and Liza accompanied them in a light blue dress, with light blue ribbons on her head, and with wide sleeves under which her long white arms and angular elbows were visible.
 
Eugene did not wish to come out, but it was ridiculous to hide, and he too came out onto the porch smoking a cigarette, bowed to the men and lads, and talked with one of them. The women meanwhile shouted a dance-song with all their might, snapping their fingers, clapping their hands, and dancing.
 
"They are calling for the master," said a youngster coming up to Eugene's wife, who had not noticed the call. Liza called Eugene to look at the dance and at one of the women dancers who particularly pleased her. This was Stepanida. She wore a yellow skirt, a velveteen sleeveless jacket and a silk kerchief, and was broad, energetic, ruddy, and merry. No doubt she danced well. He saw nothing.
 
"Yes, yes," he said, removing and replacing his pince-nez. "Yes, yes," he repeated. "So it seems I cannot be rid of her," he thought.
 
He did not look at her, fearing her attraction, and just on that account what his passing glance caught of her seemed to him especially attractive. Besides this he saw by her sparkling look that she saw him and saw that he admired her. He stood there as long as propriety demanded, and seeing that Varvara Alexeevna had called her "my dear" senselessly and insincerely and was talking to her, he turned aside and went away.
 
He went into the house in order not to see her, but on reaching the upper story he approached the window, without knowing how or why, and as long as the women remained at the porch he stood there and looked and looked at her, feasting his eyes on her.
 
He ran, while there was no one to see him, and then went with quiet steps onto the veranda and from there, smoking a cigarette, he passed through the garden as if going for a stroll, and followed the direction she had taken. He had not gone two steps along the alley before he noticed behind the trees a velveteen sleeveless jacket, with a pink and yellow skirt and a red kerchief. She was going somewhere with another woman. "Where are they going?"
 
And suddenly a terrible desire scorched him as though a hand were seizing his heart. As if by someone else's wish he looked round and went towards her.
 
"Eugene Ivanich, Eugene Ivanich! I have come to see your honour," said a voice behind him, and Eugene, seeing old Samokhin who was digging a well for him, roused himself and turning quickly round went to meet Samokhin. While speaking with him he turned sideways and saw that she and the woman who was with her went down the slope, evidently to the well or making an excuse of the well, and having stopped there a little while ran back to the dancecircle.
  XIII
 
After talking to Samokhin, Eugene returned to the house as depressed as if he had committed a crime. In the first place she had understood him, believed that he wanted to see her, and desired it herself. Secondly that other woman, Anna Prokhorova, evidently knew of it.
 
Above all he felt that he was conquered, that he was not master of his own will but that there was another power moving him, that he had been saved only by good fortune, and that if not today then tomorrow or a day later, he would perish all the same.
 
"Yes, perish," he did not understand it otherwise: to be unfaithful to his young and loving wife with a peasant woman in the village, in the sight of everyone -- what was it but to perish, perish utterly, so that it would be impossible to live? No, something must be done.
 
"My God, my God! What am I to do? Can it be that I shall perish like this?" said he to himself. Is it not possible to do anything? Yet something must be done. Do not think about her" - he ordered himself. "Do not think!" and immediately he began thinking and seeing her before him, and seeing also the shade of the plane-tree.
 
He remembered having read of a hermit who, to avoid the temptation he felt for a woman on whom he had to lay his hand to heal her, thrust his other hand into a brazier and burnt his fingers. he called that to mind. "Yes, I am ready to burn my fingers rather than to perish." He looked round to make sure that there was no one in the room, lit a candle, and put a finger into the flame. "There, now think about her," he said to himself ironically. It hurt him and he withdrew his smoke-stained finger, threw away the match, and laughed at himself. What nonsense! That was not what had to be done. But it was necessary to do something, to avoid seeing her -- either to go away himself or to send her away. yes -- send her away. Offer her husband money to remove to town or to another village. People would hear of it and would talk about it. Well, what of that? At any rate it was better than this danger. "Yes, that must be done," he said to himself, and at that very moment he was looking at her without moving his eyes. "Where is she going?" he suddenly asked himself. She, it seemed to him, had seen him at the window and now, having glanced at him and taken another woman by the hand, was going towards the garden swinging her arm briskly. Without knowing why or wherefore, merely in accord with what he had been thinking, he went to the office.
 
Vasili Nikolaich in holiday costume and with oiled hair was sitting at tea with his wife and a guest who was wearing an oriental kerchief.
 
"I want a word with you, Vasili Nikolaich!"
 
"Please say what you want to. We have finished tea."
 
"No. I'd rather you came out with me."
 
"Directly; only let me get my cap. Tanya, put out the samovar," said Vasili Nikolaich, stepping outside cheerfully. It seemed to Eugene that Vasili had been drinking, but what was to be done? It might be all the better -- he would sympathize with him in his difficulties the more readily.
 
"I have come again to speak about that same matter, Vasili Nikolaich," said Eugene -- "about that woman."
 
"Well, what of her? I told them not to take her again on any account."
 
"No, I have been thinking in general, and this is what I wanted to take your advice about. Isn't it possible to get them away, to send the whole family away?"
 
"Where can they be sent?" said Vasili, disapprovingly and ironically as it seem to Eugene.
 
"Well, I thought of giving them money, or even some land in Koltovski, -- so that she should not be here."
 
"But how can they be sent away? Where is he to go -- torn up from his roots? And why should you do it? What harm can she do you?"
 
"Ah, Vasili Nikolaich, you must understand that it would be dreadful for my wife to hear of it."
 
"But who will tell her?"
 
"How can I live with this dread? The whole thing is vary painful for me."
 
"But really, why should you distress yourself? Whoever stirs up the past -- out with his eye! Who is not a sinner before God and to blame before the Tsar, as the saying is?"
 
"All the same it would be better to get rid of them. Can't you speak to the husband?"
 
"But it is no use speaking! Eh, Eugene Ivanich, what is the matter with you? It is all past and forgotten. All sorts of things happen. Who is there that would now say anything bad of you? Everybody sees you."
 
"But all the same go and have a talk with him."
 
"All right, I will speak to him."
 
Though he knew that nothing would come of it, this talk somewhat calmed Eugene. Above all, it made him feel that through excitement he had been exaggerating the danger.
 
Had he gone to meet her by appointment? It was impossible He had simply gone to stroll in the garden and she had happened to run out at the same time.
  XIV
 
After dinner that very Trinity Sunday Liza while walking from the garden to the meadow, where her husband wanted to show her the clover, took a false step and fell when crossing a little ditch. She fell gently, on her side; but she gave an exclamation, and her husband saw an expression in her face not only of fear but of pain. He was about to help her up, but she motioned him away with her hand.
 
"No, wait a bit, Eugene," she said, with a weak smile, and looked up guiltily as it seemed to him. "My foot only gave way under me."
 
"There, I always say," remarked Varvara Alexeevna, "can anyone in her condition possibly jump over ditches?"
 
"But it is all right, mamma. I shall get up directly." With her husband's help she did get up, but she immediately turned pale, and looked frightened.
 
"Yes, I am not well!" and she whispered something to her mother.
 
"Oh, my God, what have you done! I said you ought not to go there," cried Varvara Alexeevna. "Wait -- I will call the
 
servants. She must not walk. She must be carried!"
 
"Don't be afraid, Liza, I will carry you," said Eugene, putting his left arm round her. "Hold me by the neck. Like that." And stopping down he put his right arm under her knees and lifted her. He could never afterwards forget the suffering and yet beatific expression of her face.
 
"I am too heavy for you, dear," she said with a smile. "Mamma is running, tell her!" And she bent towards him and kissed him. She evidently wanted her mother to see how he was carrying her.
 
Eugene shouted to Varvara Alexeevna not to hurry, and that he would carry Liza home. Varvara Alexeevna stopped and began to shout still louder.
 
"You will drop her, you'll be sure to drop her. You want to destroy her. You have no conscience!"
 
"But I am carrying her excellently."
 
"I do not want to watch you killing my daughter, and I can't." And she ran round the bend in the alley.
 
"Never mind, it will pass," said Liza, smiling.
 
"Yes, If only it does not have consequences like last time." "No. I am not speaking of that. That is all right. I mean mamma. You are tired. Rest a bit."
 
But though he found it heavy, Eugene carried his burden
 
proudly and gladly to the house and did not hand her over to the housemaid and the man-cook whom Varvara Alexeevna had found and sent to meet them. He carried her to the bedroom and put her on the bed.
 
"Now go away," she said, and drawing his hand to her she kissed it. "Annushka and I will manage all right."
 
Mary Pavlovna also ran in from her rooms in the wing. They undressed Liza and laid her on the bed. Eugene sat in the drawing room with a book in his hand, waiting. Varvara Alexeevna went past him with such a reproachfully gloomy air that he felt alarmed.
 
"Well, how is it?" he asked.
 
"How is it? What's the good of asking? It is probably what you wanted when you made your wife jump over the ditch."
 
"Varvara Alexeevna!" he cried. "This is impossible. If you want to torment people and to poison their life" (he wanted to say, "then go elsewhere to do it," but restrained himself). "How is it that it does not hurt you?"
 
"It is too late now." And shaking her cap in a triumphant manner she passed out by the door.
 
The fall had really been a bad one; Liza's foot had twisted awkwardly and there was danger of her having another miscarriage. Everyone knew that there was nothing to be done but that she must just lie quietly, yet all the same they decided to send for a doctor.
 
"Dear Nikolay Semenich," wrote Eugene to the doctor, "you have always been so kind to us that I hope you will not refuse to come to my wife's assistance. She..." and so on. Having written the letter he went to the stables to arrange about the horses and the carriage. Horses had to be got ready to bring the doctor and others to take him back. When an estate is not run on a large scale, such things cannot be quickly decided but have to be considered. Having arranged it all and dispatched the coachman, it was past nine before he got back to the house. His wife was lying down, and said that she felt perfectly well and had no pain. But Varvara Alexeevna was sitting with a lamp screened from Liza by some sheets of music and knitting a large red coverlet, with a mien that said that after what had happened peace was impossible, but that she at any rate would do her duty no matter what anyone else did.
 
Eugene noticed this, but, to appear as if he had not done so, tried to assume a cheerful and tranquil air and told how he had chosen the horses and how capitally the mare, Kabushka, had galloped as left trace-horse in the troyka.
 
"Yes, of course, it is just the time to exercise the horses when help is needed. Probably the doctor will also be thrown into the ditch," remarked Varvara Alexeevna, examining her knitting from under her pince-nez and moving it close up to the lamp.
 
"But you know we had to send one way or another, and I made the best arrangement I could."
 
"Yes, I remember very well how your horses galloped with me under the arch of the gateway." This was a long-standing fancy of hers, and Eugene now was injudicious enough to remark that that was not quite what had happened.
 
"It is not for nothing that I have always said, and have often remarked to the prince, that it is hardest of all to live with people who are untruthful and insincere. I can endure anything except that."
 
"Well, if anyone has to suffer more than another, it is certainly I," said Eugene. "But you..."
 
"Yes, it is evident."
 
"What?"
 
"Nothing, I am only counting my stitches."
 
Eugene was standing at the time by the bed and Liza was looking at him, and one of her moist hands outside the coverlet caught his hand and pressed it. "Bear with her for my sake. You know she cannot prevent our loving one another," was what her look said.
 
"I won't do so again. It's nothing," he whispered, and he kissed her damp, long hand and then her affectionate eyes, which closed while he kissed them.
 
"Can it be the same thing over again?" he asked. "How are you feeling?"
 
"I am afraid to say for fear of being mistaken, but I feel that he is alive and will live," said she, glancing at her stomach.
 
"Ah, it is dreadful, dreadful to think of."
 
Notwithstanding Liza's insistence that he should go away, Eugene spent the night with her, hardly closing an eye and ready to attend on her.
 
But she passed the night well, and had they not sent for the doctor she would perhaps have got up.
 
By dinner-time the doctor arrived and of course said that though if the symptoms recurred there might be cause for apprehension, yet actually there were no positive symptoms, but as there were also no contrary indications one might suppose on the one hand that -- and on the other hand that... And therefore she must lie still, and that "though I do not like prescribing, yet all the same she should take this mixture and should lie quiet." Besides this, the doctor gave Varvara Alexeevna a lecture on woman's anatomy, during which Varvara Alexeevna nodded her head significantly. Having received his fee, as usual into the backmost part of his palm, the doctor drove away and the patient was left to lie in bed for a week.
  XV
 
Eugene spent most of his time by his wife's bedside, talking to her, reading to her, and what was hardest of all, enduring without murmur Varvara Alexeevna's attacks, and even contriving to turn these into jokes.
 
But he could not stay at home all the time. In the first place his wife sent him away, saying that he would fall ill if he always remained with her; and secondly the farming was progressing in a way that demanded his presence at every step. He could not stay at home, but had to be in the fields, in the wood, in the garden, at the thrashing-floor; and everywhere he was pursued not merely by the thought but by the vivid image of Stepanida, and he only occasionally forgot her. But that would not have mattered, he could perhaps have mastered his feeling; what was worst of all was that, whereas he had previously lived for months without seeing her, he now continually came across her. She evidently understood that he wished to renew relations with her and tried to come in his way. Nothing was said either by him or by her, and therefore neither he nor she went directly to a rendezvous, but only sought opportunities of meeting.
 
The most possible place for them to meet was in the forest, where peasant-women went with sacks to collect grass for their cows. Eugene knew this and therefore went there every day. Every day he told himself that he would not go, and every day it ended by his making his way to the forest and, on hearing the sound of voices, standing behind the bushes with sinking heart looking to see if she was there.
 
Why he wanted to know whether it was she who was there, he did not know. If it had been she and she had been alone, he would not have gone to her -- so he believed -- he would have run away; but he wanted to see her.
 
Once he met her. As he was entering the forest she came out of it with two other women, carrying a heavy sack full of grass on her back. A little earlier he would perhaps have met her in the forest. Now, with the other women there, she could not go back to him. But though he realized this impossibility, he stood for a long time behind a hazel bush, at the risk of attracting the other women's attention. Of course she did not return, but he stayed there a long time. and, great heavens, how delightful his imagination made her appear to him! And this not only once, but five or six times, and each time more intensely. never had she seemed so attractive, and never had he been so completely in her power.
 
He felt that he had lost control of himself and had become almost insane. His strictness with himself had not weakened a jog; on the contrary he saw all the abomination of his desire and even of his action, for his going to the wood was an action. He knew that he only need come near her anywhere in the dark, and if possible touch her, and he would yield to his feelings. He knew that it was only shame before people, before her, and no doubt before himself that restrained him. And he knew too that he had sought conditions in which that shame would not be apparent -- darkness or proximity -- in which it would be stifled by animal passion. and therefore he knew that he was a wretched criminal, and despised and hated himself with all his soul. He hated himself because he still had not surrendered: every day he prayed God to strengthen him, to save him from perishing; every day he determined that from today onward he would not take a step to see her, and would forget her. Every day he devised means of delivering himself from this enticement, and he made use of those means.
 
But it was all in vain.
 
One of the means was continual occupation; another was intense physical work and fasting; a third was imagining to himself the shame that would fall upon him when everybody knew of it -- his wife, his mother-in-law, and the folk around. He did all this and it seemed to him that he was conquering, but midday came -- the hour of their former meetings and the hour when he had met her carrying the grass -- and he went to the forest. Thus five days of torment passed. He only saw her from a distance, and did not once encounter her.
  XVI
 
Liza was gradually recovering, she could move about and was only uneasy at the change that had taken place in her husband, which she did not understand.
 
Varvara Alexeevna had gone away for a while, and the only visitor was Eugene's uncle. Mary Pavlovna was as usual at home.
 
Eugene was in his semi-insane condition when there came two days of pouring rain, as often happens after thunder in June. The rain stopped all work. They even ceased carting manure on account of the dampness and dirt. The peasants remained at home. The herdsmen wore themselves out with the cattle, and eventually drove them home. The cows and sheep wandered about in the pastureland and ran loose in the grounds. The peasant women, barefoot and wrapped in shawls, splashing through the mud, rushed about to seek the runaway cows. Streams flowed everywhere along the paths, all the leaves and all the grass were saturated with water, and streams flowed unceasingly from the spouts into the bubbling puddles. Eugene sat at home with his wife, who was particularly wearisome that day. She questioned Eugene several times as to the cause of his discontent, and he replied with vexation that nothing was the matter. She ceased questioning him but was still distressed.
 
They were sitting after breakfast in the drawing room. His uncle for the hundredth time was recounting fabrications about his society acquaintances. Liza was knitting a jacket and sighed, complaining of the weather and of a pain in the small of her back. The uncle advised her to lie down, and asked for vodka for himself. It was terribly dull for Eugene in the house. Everything was weak and dull. He read a book and a magazine, but understood nothing of them.
 
"I must go out and look at the rasping-machine they brought yesterday," said he, and got up and went out.
 
"Take an umbrella with you."
 
"Oh, no, I have a leather coat. And I am only going as far as the boiling-room."
 
He put on his boots and his leather coat and went to the factory; and he had not gone twenty steps before he met her coming towards him, with her skirts tucked up high above her white calves. She was walking, holding down the shawl in which her head and shoulders were wrapped.
 
"Where are you going?" said he, not recognizing her the first instant. When he recognized her it was already too late. She stopped, smiling, and looked long at him.
 
"I am looking for a calf. Where are you off to in such weather?" said she, as if she were seeing him every day.
 
"Come to the shed," said he suddenly, without knowing how he
 
said it. It was as if someone else had uttered the words.
 
She bit her shawl, winked, and ran in the direction which led from the garden to the shed, and he continued his path, intending to turn off beyond the lilac-bush and go there too.
 
"Master," he heard a voice behind him. "The mistress is calling you, and wants you to come back for a minute."
 
This was Misha, his man-servant.
 
"My God! This is the second time you have saved me," thought Eugene, and immediately turned back. His wife reminded him that he had promised to take some medicine at the dinner hour to a sick woman, and he had better take it with him.
 
While they were getting the medicine some five minutes elapsed, and then, going away with the medicine, he hesitated to go direct to the shed lest he should be seen from the house, but as soon as he was out of sight he promptly turned and made his way to it. He already saw her in imagination inside the shed smiling gaily. But she was not there, and there was nothing in the shed to show that she had been there.
 
He was already thinking that she had not come, had not heard or understood his words -- he had muttered them through his nose as if afraid of her hearing them -- or perhaps she had not wanted to come. "And why did I imagine that she would rush to me? She has her own husband; it is only I who am such a wretch as to have a wife, and a good one, and to run after another." Thus he thought sitting in the shed, the thatch of which had a leak and dripped from its straw. "But how delightful it would be if she did come -- alone here in this rain. If only I could embrace her once again, then let happen what may. But I could tell if she has been here by her footprints," he reflected. He looked at the trodden ground near the shed and at the path overgrown by grass, and the fresh print of bare feet, and even of one that had slipped, was visible.
 
"Yes, she has been here. Well, now it is settled. Wherever I may see her I shall go straight to her. I will go to her at night." He sat for a long time in the shed and left it exhausted and crushed. He delivered the medicine, returned home, and lay down in his room to wait for dinner.
  XVII
 
Before dinner Liza came to him and, still wondering what could be the cause of his discontent, began to say that she was afraid he did not like the idea of her going to Moscow for her confinement, and that she had decided that she would remain at home and on no account go to Moscow. He knew how she feared both her confinement itself and the risk of not having a healthy child, and therefore he could not help being touched at seeing how ready she was to sacrifice everything for his sake. All was so nice, so pleasant, so clean, in the house; and in his soul it was so dirty, despicable, and foul. the whole evening Eugene was tormented by knowing that notwithstanding his sincere repulsion at his own weakness, notwithstanding his firm intention to break off, -- the same thing would happen again tomorrow.
 
"No, this is impossible," he said to himself, walking up and down in his room. "There must be some remedy for it. My God! What am I to do?"
 
Someone knocked at the door as foreigners do. he knew this must be his uncle. "Come in," he said.
 
The uncle had come as a self-appointed ambassador from Liza. "Do you know, I really do notice that there is a change in you," he said, -- "and Liza -- I understand how it troubles her. I understand that it must be hard for you to leave all the business you have so excellently started, but *que veux-tu*? I should advise you to go away. it will be more satisfactory both for you and for her. And do you know, I should advise you to go to the Crimea. The climate is beautiful and there is an excellent *accoucheur* there, and you would be just in time for the best of the grape season."
 
"Uncle," Eugene suddenly exclaimed. "Can you keep a secret? A secret that is terrible tome, a shameful secret."
 
"Oh, come -- do you really feel any doubt of me?"
 
"Uncle, you can help me. Not only help, but save me!" said Eugene. And the thought of disclosing his secret to his uncle whom he did not respect, the thought that he should show himself in the worst light and humiliate himself before him, was pleasant. He felt himself to be despicable and guilty, and wished to punish himself.
 
"Speak, my dear fellow, you know how fond I am of you," said the uncle, evidently well content that there was a secret and that it was a shameful one, and that it would be communicated to him, and that he could be of use.
 
"First of all I must tell you that I am a wretch, a good-for- nothing, a scoundrel -- a real scoundrel."
 
"Now what are you saying..." began his uncle, as if he were offended.
 
"What! Not a wretch when I -- Liza's husband, Liza's! One has only to know her purity, her love -- and that I, her husband, want to be untrue to her with a peasant-woman!"
 
"What is this? Why do you want to -- you have not bee unfaithful to her?"
 
"Yes, at least just the same as being untrue, for it did not depend on me. I was ready to do so. I was hindered, or else I should...now. I do not know what I should have done..."
 
"But please, explain to me..."
 
"Well, it is like this. When I was a bachelor I was stupid enough to have relations with a woman here in our village. That is to say, I used to have meetings with her in the forest, in the field..."
 
"Was she pretty?" asked his uncle.
 
Eugene frowned at this question, but he was in such need of external help that he made as if he did not hear it, and continued:
 
"Well, I thought this was just casual and that I should break it off and have done with it. And I did break it off before my marriage. For nearly a year I did not see her or think about her." It seemed strange to Eugene himself to hear the description of his own condition. "Then suddenly, I don't myself know why -- really one sometimes believes in witchcraft -- I saw her, and a worm crept into my heart; and it gnaws. I reproach myself, I understand the full horror of my action, that is to say, of the act I may commit any moment, and yet I myself turn to it, and if I have not
 
committed it, it is only because God preserved me. Yesterday I was on my way to see her when Liza sent for me."
 
"What, in the rain?"
 
"Yes. I am worn out, Uncle, and have decided to confess to you and to ask your help." "Yes, of course, it's a bad thing on your own estate. People will get to know. I understand that Liza is weak and that it is necessary to spare her, but why on your own estate?"
 
Again Eugene tried not to hear what his uncle was saying, and hurried on to the core of the matter.
 
"Yes, save me from myself. That is what I ask of you. Today I was hindered by chance. But tomorrow or next time no one will hinder me. And she knows now. Don't leave me alone."
 
"Yes, all right," said his uncle, -- "but are you really so much in love?"
 
"Oh, it is not that at all. It is not that, it is some kind of power that has seized me and holds me. I do not know what to do. Perhaps I shall gain strength, and then..."
 
"Well, it turns out as I suggested," said his uncle. "Let us be off to the Crimea."
 
"Yes, yes, let us go, and meanwhile you will be with me and will talk to me."
  XVIII
 
The fact that Eugene had confided his secret to his uncle, and still more the sufferings of his conscience and the feeling of shame he experienced after that rainy day, sobered him. It was settled that they would start for Yalta in a week's time. During that week Eugene drove to town to get money for the journey, gave instructions from the house and from the office concerning the management of the estate, again became gay and friendly with his wife, and began to awaken morally.
 
So without having once seen Stepanida after that rainy day he left with his wife for the Crimea. There he spent an excellent two months. He received so many new impressions that it seemed to him that the past was obliterated from his memory. In the Crimea they met former acquaintances and became particularly friendly with them, and they also made new acquaintances. Life in the Crimea was a continual holiday for Eugene, besides being instructive and beneficial. They became friendly there with the former Marshal of the Nobility of their province, a clever and liberal-minded man who became fond of Eugene and coached him, and attracted him to his Party.
 
At the end of August Liza gave birth to a beautiful, healthy daughter, and her confinement was unexpectedly easy.
 
In September they returned home, the four of them, including the baby and its wet-nurse, as Liza was unable to nurse it herself. Eugene returned home entirely free from the former horrors and
 
quite a new and happy man. Having gone through all that a husband goes through when his wife bears a child, he loved her more than ever. His feeling for the child when he took it in his arms was a funny, new, very pleasant and, as it were, a tickling feeling. Another new thing in his life now was that, besides his occupation with the estate, thanks to his acquaintance with Dumchin (the ex- Marshal) a new interest occupied his mind, that of the Zemstvo -- partly an ambitious interest, partly a feeling of duty. In October there was to be a special Assembly, at which he was to be elected. After arriving home he drove once to town and another time to Dumchin.
 
Of the torments of his temptation and struggle he had forgotten even to think, and could with difficulty recall them to mind. It seemed to him something like an attack of insanity he had undergone.
 
To such an extend did he now feel free from it that he was not even afraid to make inquiries on the first occasion when he remained alone with the steward. As he had previously spoken to him about the matter he was not ashamed to ask.
 
"Well, and is Sidor Pechnikov still away from home?" he inquired.
 
"Yes, he is still in town."
 
"And his wife?"
 
"Oh, she is a worthless woman. She is now carrying on with Zenovi. She has gone quite on the loose."
 
"Well, that is all right," thought Eugene. "How wonderfully indifferent to it I am! How I have changed."
  XIX
 
All that Eugene had wished had been realized. He had obtained the property, the factory was working successfully, the beet-crops were excellent, and he expected a large income; his wife had borne a child satisfactorily, his mother-in-law had left, and he had been unanimously elected to the Zemstvo.
 
He was returning home from town after the election. He had been congratulated and had had to return thanks. He had had dinner and had drunk some five glasses of champagne. Quite new plans of life now presented themselves to him, and he was thinking about these as he drove home. It was the Indian summer: an excellent road and a hot sun. As he approached his home Eugene was thinking of how, as a result of this election, he would occupy among the people the position he had always dreamed of; that is to say, one in which he would be able to serve them not only by production, which gave employment, but also by direct influence. He imagined what his own and the other peasants would think of him in three years' time. "For instance this one," he thought, drifting just then through the village and glancing at a peasant who with a peasant woman was crossing the street in front of him carrying a full water-tub. They stopped to let his carriage pass. The peasant was old Pechnikov, and the woman was Stepanida. Eugene looked at her, recognized her, and was glad to feel that he remained quite tranquil. She was still as good looking as ever, but this did not touch him at all. He drove home.
 
"Well, may we congratulate you?" said his uncle.
 
"Yes, I was elected."
 
"Capital! We must drink to it!"
 
Next day Eugene drove about to see to the farming which he had been neglecting. At the outlying farmstead a new thrashing machine was at work. While watching it Eugene stepped among the women, trying not to take notice of them; but try as he would he once or twice noticed the black eyes and red kerchief of Stepanida, who was carrying away the straw. Once or twice he glanced sideways at her and felt that something was happening, but could not account for it to himself. Only next day, when he again drove to the thrashing floor and spent two hours there quite unnecessarily, without ceasing to caress with his eyes the familiar, handsome figure of the young woman, did he feel that he was lost, irremediably lost. Again those torments! Again all that horror and fear, and there was no saving himself. What he expected happened to him. The evening of the next day, without knowing how, he found himself at her back yard, by her hay shed, where in autumn they had once had a meeting. As though having a stroll, he stopped there lighting a cigarette. A neighbouring peasant-woman saw him, and as he turned back he heard her say to someone: "Go, he is waiting for you -- on my dying word he is standing there. Go, you fool!"
 
He saw how a woman -- she -- ran to the hay shed; but as a peasant had met him it was no longer possible for him to turn back, and so he went home.
 

XX

  When he entered the drawing-room everything seemed strange and unnatural to him. He had risen that morning vigorous, determined to fling it all aside, to forget it and not allow himself to think about it. But without noticing how it occurred he had all the morning not merely not interested himself in the work, but tried to avoid it. What had formerly cheered him and been important was now insignificant. Unconsciously he tried to free himself from business. It seemed to him that he had to do so in order to think and to plan. And he freed himself and remained alone. But as soon as he was alone he began to wander about in the garden and the forest. And all those spots were besmirched in his recollection by memories that gripped him. He felt that he was walking in the garden and pretending to himself that he was thinking out something, but that really he was not thinking out anything, but insanely and unreasonably expecting her; expecting that by some miracle she would be aware that he was expecting her, and would come here at once and go somewhere where no one would see them, or would come at night when there would be no moon, and no one, not even she herself, would see -- on such a night she would come and he would touch her body.... 
"There now, talking of breaking off when I wish to," he said to himself. "Yes, and that is having a clean healthy woman for one's health sake! No, it seems one can't play with her like that. I thought I had taken her, but it was she who took me; took me and does not let me go. Why, I thought I was free, but I was not free and was deceiving myself when I married. It was all nonsense -fraud. From the time I had her I experienced a new feeling, the real feeling of a husband. Yes, I ought to have lived with her.   "One of two lives is possible for me: that which I began with Liza: service, estate management, the child, and people's respect. If that is life, it is necessary that she, Stepanida, should not be there. She must be sent away, as I said, or destroyed so that she shall not exist. And the other life -- is this: For me to take her away from her husband, pay him money, disregard the shame and disgrace, and live with her. But in that case it is necessary that Liza should not exist, nor Mimi (the baby). No, that is not so, the baby does not matter, but it is necessary that there should be no Liza -- that she should go away -- that she should know, curse me, and go away. That she should know that I have exchanged her for a peasant woman, that I am a deceiver and a scoundrel! -- No, that is too terrible! It is impossible. But it might happen," he went on thinking -- "it might happen that Liza might fall ill and die. Die, and then everything would be capital. 
"Capital! Oh, scoundrel! No, if someone must die it should be Stepanida. If she were to die, how good it would be.   "Yes, that is how men come to poison or kill their wives or lovers. Take a revolver and go and call her, and instead of embracing her, shoot her in the breast and have done with it. "Really she is -- a devil. Simply a devil. She has possessed herself of me against my own will.   "Kill? Yes. there are only two ways out: to kill my wife or her. For it is impossible to live like this. alternate ending begins here It is impossible! I must consider the matter and look ahead. If things remain as they are what will happen? I shall again be saying to myself that I do not wish it and that I will throw her off, but it will be merely words; in the evening I shall be at her back yard, and she will know it and will come out. And if people know of it and tell my wife, or if I tell her myself -- for I can't lie -- I shall not be able to live so. I cannot! People will know. They will all know - - Parasha and the blacksmith. Well, is it possible to live so?   "Impossible! there are only two ways out: to kill my wife, or to kill her. yes, or else...Ah, yes, there is a third way: to kill myself," said he softly, and suddenly a shudder ran over his skin. "Yes, kill myself, then I shall not need to kill them." He became frightened, for he felt that only that way was possible. He had a revolver. "Shall I really kill myself? It is something I never thought of -- how strange it will be..."   He returned to his study and at once opened the cupboard where the revolver lay, but before he had taken it out of its case his wife entered the room.  

XXI 

He threw a newspaper over the revolver. 
"Again the same!" said she aghast when she had looked at him. "What is the same?" 
"The same terrible expression that you had before and would not explain to me. Jenya, dear one, tell me about it. I see that you are suffering. Tell me and you will feel easier. Whatever it may be, it will be better than for you to suffer so. Don't I know that it is nothing bad?" 
"You know? While..."   "Tell me, tell me, tell me. I won't let you go."   He smiled a piteous smile.   "Shall I? -- No, it is impossible. And there is nothing to tell."   Perhaps he might have told her, but at that moment the wetnurse entered to ask if she should go for a walk. Liza went out to dress the baby.   "Then you will tell me? I will be back directly."   "Yes, perhaps..." 
She never could forget the piteous smile with which he said this. She went out. 
Hurriedly, stealthily like a robber, he seized the revolver and took it out of its case. It was loaded, yes, but long ago, and one cartridge was missing.   "Well, how will it be?" He put it to his temple and hesitated a little, but as soon as he remembered Stepanida -- his decision not to see her, his struggle, temptation, fall, and renewed struggle - - he shuddered with horror. "No, this is better," and he pulled the trigger...   When Liza ran into the room -- she had only had time to step down from the balcony -- he was lying face downwards on the floor: black, warm blood was gushing from the wound, and his corpse was twitching.   There was an inquest. No one could understand or explain the suicide. It never even entered his uncle's head that its cause could be anything in common with the confession Eugene had made to him two months previously. 
Varvara Alexeevna assured them that she had always foreseen it. It had been evident from his way of disputing. Neither Liza nor Mary Pavlovna could at all understand why it had happened, but still they did not believe what the doctors said, namely, that he was mentally deranged -- a psychopath. They were quite unable to accept this, for they knew he was saner than hundreds of their acquaintances.   And indeed if Eugene Irtenev was mentally deranged everyone is in the same case; the most mentally deranged people are certainly those who see in others indications of insanity they do not notice in themselves.
 

Alternate Ending

"To kill, yes. there are only two ways out: to kill my wife, or to kill her. For it is impossible to live like this," said he to himself, and going up to the table he took from it a revolver and, having examined it -- one cartridge was wanting -- he put it in his trouser pocket. 
"My God! What am I doing?" he suddenly exclaimed, and folding his hands he began to pray. 
"O God, help me and deliver me! Thou knowest that I do not desire evil, but by myself am powerless. Help me," said he, making the sign of the cross on his breast before the icon.   "Yes, I can control myself. I will go out, walk about and think things over."   He went to the entrance-hall, put on his overcoat and went out onto the porch. Unconsciously his steps took him past the garden along the field path to the outlying farmstead. There the thrashing machine was still droning and the cries of the driver lads were heard. He entered the barn. She was there. He saw her at once. She was raking up the corn, and on seeing him she ran briskly and merrily about, with laughing eyes, raking up the scattered corn with agility. eugene could not help watching her though he did not wish to do so. He only recollected himself when she was no longer in sight. The clerk informed him that they were now finishing thrashing the corn that had been beaten down -- that was why it was going slower and the output was less. Eugene went up to the drum, which occasionally gave a knock as sheaves not evenly fed in passed under it, and he asked the clerk if there were many such sheaves of beaten-down corn. 
"There will be five cartloads of it." 
"Then look here..." began Eugene, but he did not finish the sentence. She had gone close up to the drum and was raking the corn from under it, and she scorched him with her laughing eyes. That look spoke of a merry, careless love between them, of the fact that she knew he wanted her and had come to her shed, and that she as always was ready to live and be merry with him regardless of all conditions or consequences. Eugene felt himself to be in her power but did not wish to yield. 
He remembered his prayer and tried to repeat it. He began saying it to himself, but at once felt that it was useless. A single thought now engrossed him entirely: how to arrange a meeting with her so that the others should not notice it. 
"If we finish this lot today, are we to start on a fresh stack or leave it till tomorrow?" asked the clerk. 
"Yes, yes," replied Eugene, involuntarily following her to the heap to which with the other women she was raking the corn. 
"But can I really not master myself?" said he to himself. "Have I really perished? O God! But there is not God. There is only a devil. And it is she. She has possessed me. But I won't, I won't! A devil, yes, a devil." 
Again he went up to her, drew the revolver from his pocket and shot her, once, twice, thrice, in the back. She ran a few steps and fell on the heap of corn. 
"My God, my God! What is that?" cried the women. 
"No, it was not an accident. I killed her on purpose," cried Eugene. "Send for the police-officer." 
He went home and went to his study and locked himself in, without speaking to his wife.   "Do not come to me," he cried to her through the door. "You will know all about it."   An hour later he rang, and bade the man-servant who answered the bell: "Go and find out whether Stepanida is alive." 
The servant already knew all about it, and told him she had died an hour ago. 
"Well, all right. Now leave me alone. When the police officer or the magistrate comes, let me know."   The police officer and magistrate arrived next morning, and Eugene, having bidden his wife and baby farewell, was taken to prison.   He was tried. It was during the early days of trial by jury, and the verdict was one of temporary insanity, and he was sentenced only to perform church penance. 
He had been kept in prison for nine months and was then confined in a monastery for one month. 
He had begun to drink while still in prison, continued to do so in the monastery, and returned home an enfeebled, irresponsible drunkard. 
Varvara Alexeevna assured them that she had always predicted this. it was, she said, evident from the way he disputed. Neither Liza nor Mary Pavlovna could understand how the affair had happened, but for all that, they did not believe what the doctors said, namely, that he was mentally deranged -- a psychopath. They could not accept that, for the knew that he was saner than hundreds of their acquaintances. 
And indeed, if Eugene Iretnev was mentally deranged when he committed this crime, then everyone is similarly insane. The most mentally deranged people are certainly those who see in others indications of insanity they do not notice in themselves.

1911 encyclopedia

Up to date as of January 14, 2010
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From LoveToKnow 1911

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Wiktionary

Up to date as of January 15, 2010

Definition from Wiktionary, a free dictionary

See also devil

Contents

English

Etymology

See devil

Proper noun

Singular
Devil
Plural
-
Devil
  1. (theology) The chief devil; Satan.

Anagrams

  • Anagrams of deilv
  • lived

Bible wiki

Up to date as of January 23, 2010

From BibleWiki

(Gr. diabolos), a slanderer, the arch-enemy of man's spiritual interest (Job 1:6; Rev 2:10; Zech 3:1). .He is called also "the accuser of the brethen" (Rev 12:10).^ Accusing : SATAN IS ACCUSING US In Revelation 12:10 the devil is portrayed as the "accuser of our brethren, who accused them before our God day and night."

.In Lev 17:7 the word "devil" is the translation of the Hebrew sair, meaning a "goat" or "satyr" (Isa 13:21; Isa 34:14), alluding to the wood-daemons, the objects of idolatrous worship among the heathen.^ "Lucifer" was first used in the Latin vulgate to translate the Hebrew word ( helel ) and eventually made its way into the King James Version.

^ Hebrew word satan meaning "adversary" or "opposer."

^ There is some disagreement among scholars whether Peter uses the word that is translated here as "chains" or whether he means "silo."
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

.In Deut 32:17 and Ps 10637 it is the translation of Hebrew shed, meaning lord, and idol, regarded by the Jews as a "demon," as the word is rendered in the Revised Version.^ "Lucifer" was first used in the Latin vulgate to translate the Hebrew word ( helel ) and eventually made its way into the King James Version.

^ Those italicized words may reach in the King James Version are not in Hebrew, but notice may reach unto heaven .
  • Assumptions About Satan 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC askelm.com [Source type: Original source]

^ Hebrew word satan meaning "adversary" or "opposer."

.In the narratives of the Gospels regarding the "casting out of devils" a different Greek word (daimon) is used.^ So, at least in Greek mythology, we can understand that these angels were cast so far down—you might say they would be out of sight.
  • Satan (Part 1) 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC cgg.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Revelation 12:4 ( Go to this verse :: Verse pop-up ) Stars, a symbol of angels , is used, meaning his angels—demons—were cast out with him.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ When Jesus sent his disciples forth on the great mission to convert the world, among other things he told them to heal the sick, to raise the dead and to cast out devils.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

.In the time of Jesus there were frequent cases of demoniacal possession (Mt 12:25ff; Mk 5:1ff; Lk 4:35; Lk 10:18, etc.^ In Revelation 12, God describes how there will be a great war in heaven sometime near the second coming of Jesus Christ.
  • Satan (Forerunner Commentary) :: Bible Tools 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC bibletools.org [Source type: Original source]

^ Jesus says in Luke 10:18, “I beheld Satan as lightning fall from heaven.” .
  • THE DEVIL, SATAN 17 January 2010 6:45 UTC www.pacinst.com [Source type: Original source]

^ There was brought unto Jesus one possessed with a devil, blind and dumb, and Jesus healed him.
  • Devil 19 January 2010 19:22 UTC www.infidels.org [Source type: Original source]

).
See also: Demonology
This article needs to be merged with Devil (Catholic Encyclopedia).
This entry includes text from Easton's Bible Dictionary, 1897.
what mentions this? (please help by turning references to this page into wiki links)

Simple English

File:At the Devil's Ball
A common image of the devil, red, with horns and a tail

In some religions, a devil is a bad spirit that tries to create problems for people. Some people also use the words "the Devil" or "Satan" for the most powerful devil. The word "devil" comes from the Greek word "diabolos" which means "someone who tells lies to hurt you". ("Diabolos" is translated to the English word "slanderer.") The Christian New Testament uses "diabolos" as a title for Satan, and so "The Devil" became another name for Satan in English.

In the Old Testament, there is the serpent and the shaitan, who may be two different characters. "Shaitan" in Hebrew means "adversary", an enemy or opponent. Shaitan is also the word used for the devil in the Koran, who often appears as an animal and tries to get people to do the wrong thing.[1]

In the Christian religion the Devil was originally an angel in heaven. But he wanted to be the ruler of heaven and so he revolted against God. After a hard fight he was defeated and thrown out of heaven. Some other angels who helped him were also thrown out.[2]

After the Devil was thrown out of heaven, he started doing bad things on the earth. He wants people to worship him instead of God. Sometimes he tries to trick people by giving them false promises.[3]

The other angels who were thrown out of heaven became evil spirits called demons. They obey the Devil and help him do evil things.

The bible says that God will punish the Devil and his demons by throwing them into a Lake of Fire that burns in Hell. This will happen in the future.

Artists draw pictures of the Devil that show him as ugly and evil. But nobody knows what he really looks like. Usually he is a spirit that nobody can see, but he can make himself look like a real person in order to trick people.

References

  1. "shaitan". The Free Dictionary. http://www.tfd.com/shaitan. Retrieved 27 December 2009. 
  2. "Devil". Wikipedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_devil. Retrieved 17 February 2010. 
  3. "The Devil". Gospel Mysteries. http://www.gospel-mysteries.net/devil-satan.html. Retrieved 17 February 2010. 
bjn:Abilis

Citable sentences

Up to date as of December 18, 2010

Here are sentences from other pages on Devil, which are similar to those in the above article.








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