Devil's Due: Wikis

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Devil's Due Publishing
Type Comic publisher
Founded 1999
Founder(s) Joshua Blaylock
Headquarters 3759 N Ravenswood Ave, #230, Chicago, Illinois
Key people Joshua Blaylock, CEO
Industry Comics
Website devilsdue.net

Devil's Due Publishing, (often abbreviated as DDP), is one of several independent comic book publishers in the United States. The company was formed in 1999 as a comic book imprint within Image Comics before breaking away in 2003.[citation needed] Based in Chicago, Illinois, DDP is best known for its wide selection of genres, including licensed and original creator-owned properties that populate its monthly comic book series and graphic novels.

Though principally a publishing company, DDP has also produced a stage play based on the Hack/Slash comic series, Stagefright, in conjunction with the New Millennium Theatre Company that played at the National Pastime Theater on Broadway, Chicago from September 23 to October 29, 2005.[1]

Contents

History

Devil's Due Publishing started in 1999 as both a commercial art studio and a small press comic-book publisher.It did not take long for the company to shift all focus onto comic books, though, and quickly become one of today's top ten comic book powerhouses.[2]

In 2004 Pat Broderick revived Micronauts at Devil's Due[3] although the title was cancelled after ten issues.

DDP announced, in Summer 2008, that they had acquired the license to produce an American comic book version of Vampire Hunter D[4][5]. It will be written Jimmy Palmiotti and called American Wasteland. Devil's Due also be republished Je suis légion by Fabien Nury and John Cassaday as an eight comic book series, I am Legion[6] as part of a larger deal to reprint work with Humanoids Publishing, including titles like The Zombies That Ate The World.[7]

Devil's Due restructured themselves for the third time in early December of 2008, laying off Editor Cody DeMatteis and Marketing Manager Brian Warmoth through "absolutely no fault of their own" according to Josh Blaylock. It was later reported that Senior Editor Mike O'Sullivan was let go from full time employment and continued to work freelance for DDP, until he was fired in May of 2009.[8] Immediately after this announcement, Comic Book Resources also reported that CEO P. J. Bickett had stepped down and Blaylock was assuming his role for the time being. Bickett left to work full-time with Kunoichi, a company Blaylock helped establish, which he left for his position at DDP.[9]

Recently Devil's Due has come under fire for non-payment of several creative teams owing several thousands that have done work for them. In an article on the website Bleeding Cool, Rich Johnston spoke to Blaylock and reported:

The company is finding recent success with Jericho, Spartacus and Hack/Slash, with delayed payments only on the latter book. This has had the knock on effect that Hack/Slash creator Tim Seeley is owed thousands, and, despite offers, feels unable to move his serial killer revenge book to another publisher, for fear of losing any chance of getting that money back. Equally, if Hack/Slash left Devil’s Due, the company could collapse completely, and Seeley would be condemning a publisher he’s been a part of for so long.

Josh tells me that rectifying the problems will take years rather than months but that it is something he’s dedicated to. He’s reduced his office overhead again, and pushing into digital comics with iTunes.[10]

DDP is represented in Hollywood by Alter Ego Entertainment and Prime Universe, who share a first-look deal with the publisher for film, television and video games. Currently, the three parties are in discussion with numerous studios about expanding Devil's Due properties into other media, with more than one project attached to serious talent.[2]

Comic series published

Published with Chaos! Comics

Published with Dabel Bros.

Published with eigoMANGA

Published with Kinetic Komicz

Published with Monkey Pharmacy

  • Elsinore #4,5
  • Elsinore: Psycho Sanctii (unreleased)

Published with Studio Ice

  • Megacity 909 #1-8
  • Mu #1-4

Published with Udon

Published with Urban Robot

  • Lo-Fi Magazine #1, 3
  • Lo-Fi Magazine Vol. 2 #4-7

References

See also

External links

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Devil's Due Publishing
Type Comic publisher
Industry Comics
Founded 1999
Founder(s) Joshua Blaylock
Key people Joshua Blaylock, CEO
Website devilsdue.net

Devil's Due Publishing, (often abbreviated as DDP), is one of several independent comic book publishers in the United States. The company was formed in 1999 as a comic book imprint within Image Comics before breaking away in 2003.[citation needed] Based in Chicago, Illinois, DDP is best known for its wide selection of genres, including licensed and original creator-owned properties that populate its monthly comic book series and graphic novels.

Though principally a publishing company, DDP has also produced a stage play based on the Hack/Slash comic series, Stagefright, in conjunction with the New Millennium Theatre Company that played at the National Pastime Theater on Broadway, Chicago from September 23 to October 29, 2005.[1][dead link]

Contents

History

Devil's Due Publishing started in 1999 as both a commercial art studio and a small press comic-book publisher.It did not take long for the company to shift all focus onto comic books, though, and quickly become one of today's top ten comic book powerhouses.[2]

In 2004 Pat Broderick revived Micronauts at Devil's Due[3] although the title was cancelled after ten issues.

DDP announced, in Summer 2008, that they had acquired the license to produce an American comic book version of Vampire Hunter D[4][5]. It will be written Jimmy Palmiotti and called American Wasteland. Devil's Due also be republished Je suis légion by Fabien Nury and John Cassaday as an eight comic book series, I am Legion[6] as part of a larger deal to reprint work with Humanoids Publishing, including titles like The Zombies That Ate The World.[7]

Devil's Due restructured themselves for the third time in early December of 2008, laying off Editor Cody DeMatteis and Marketing Manager Brian Warmoth through "absolutely no fault of their own" according to Josh Blaylock. It was later reported that Senior Editor Mike O'Sullivan was let go from full time employment and continued to work freelance for DDP, until he was fired in May of 2009.[8] Immediately after this announcement, Comic Book Resources also reported that CEO P. J. Bickett had stepped down and Blaylock was assuming his role for the time being. Bickett left to work full-time with Kunoichi, a company Blaylock helped establish, which he left for his position at DDP.[9]

Recently Devil's Due has come under fire for non-payment of several creative teams owing several thousands that have done work for them. In an article on the website Bleeding Cool, Rich Johnston spoke to Blaylock and reported:

The company is finding recent success with Jericho, Spartacus and Hack/Slash, with delayed payments only on the latter book. This has had the knock on effect that Hack/Slash creator Tim Seeley is owed thousands, and, despite offers, feels unable to move his serial killer revenge book to another publisher, for fear of losing any chance of getting that money back. Equally, if Hack/Slash left Devil’s Due, the company could collapse completely, and Seeley would be condemning a publisher he’s been a part of for so long.

Josh tells me that rectifying the problems will take years rather than months but that it is something he’s dedicated to. He’s reduced his office overhead again, and pushing into digital comics with iTunes.[10]

DDP is represented in Hollywood by Alter Ego Entertainment and Prime Universe, who share a first-look deal with the publisher for film, television and video games. Currently, the three parties are in discussion with numerous studios about expanding Devil's Due properties into other media, with more than one project attached to serious talent.

In March 2010 - The last of DDP's comic series Hack/Slash announced it will be leaving Devil's Due for Image. Hack/Slash creator Tim Seeley confirmed this information at the Emerald City ComiCon at the Washington State Convention Center. Seeley, attributes the move to the very public financial problems with Devil's Due, (who hasn't paid artists and writers in months on numerous comic series) and simply cannot get his books out every month in those conditions.

Then on March 18 Bleeding Cool reported: http://www.bleedingcool.com/forums/showthread.php?14341-Rosenberg-Is-Due-3530-%28UPDATE%29

"Comic book colourist Rachelle Rosenberg has won a court judgement for $3530 against Devil’s Due Publishing. She wrote about the process here, but the news today is that, after travelling to Chicago for the hearing, the judge ruled in her favour

Bleeding Cool has covered Devil’s Due’s publishing woes extensively and while many people have resigned to waiting for ages for payment, or kissing it goodbye for good, Rosenberg doesn’t seem to be one of them.

There are those who think that if they cause a fuss or cause a scene, then they won’t get work. Rosenberg is proof that this is not the case, currently working on Cars for Boom! Studios.

UPDATE: Rosenberg writes for Bleeding Cool.

Well, I sued DDP. I have worked for them for the last year on titles such as, Barack the Barbarian, H/S Entry Wound and H/S Covers, and Spartacus. The money owed was for 6 H/S covers and two full issues of Barack, as well as, royalties due on the first two issues of Barack. When I first started working for DDP, I heard the rumors. The rumors that they were “late” with payments or didn’t pay, or that they were going out of business. I still took the jobs, thinking, I would be that “one”, that they did pay. During that time, I was always asking when payment was coming and at the end of the year, I contacted Tom Stillwell with Unscrewed and he help me set up a game plan to get my money. At the beginning of the year I sent a notarized and certified letter to DDP, stating what they owed me and that they had 30 days to get funds or work out a payment plan with me. As soon as DDP received the letter, I got an email from Josh Blaylock, reminding me about their financial problems and issues with Diamond. I suggested a payment plan, since I wanted to work with DDP, but Josh said “I understand the request for a payment plan – our challenge is that there are over 50 people like yourself and sending out even $50 a month requires thousands of dollars. “. As much as I understand everyone’s financial issues, at the same time, my contract with them does not stipulate that if DDP does not make any money or HAVE any money, that I do not get paid. I get paid based on the fact that I complete the work and that I do it in a timely manner. I had no choice but to file suit against them. I came fully prepared to court. I had letters from both my editors on Hack/Slash and Barack the Barbarian. Both letters stated that I did the work and that I did it well and in a professional manner. and always completing it on time. Jim Lowder, the editor on Hack/Slash also addressed the court in his letter by saying “I can cite no cause stemming from her [Rachelle's] behavior or the quality of her work that would support Devil’s Due delaying or denying payment of contractually promised fees”. I also had all my vouchers with emails on when they were sent into DDP, as well as emails back and forth between Josh and I with the excuses I received on why I was not being paid. Even with all the preparation I made to present my case, Josh did not even show. Although he did file an appearance. The judge ruled in my favor. I can’t say that it was the easiest thing I’ve done in this business. I was definitely scared, but I keep hearing these horror stories about how frustrated freelancers get from being owed thousands, so they just quit! I love my job, and I don’t ever want to get to the point where I’m frustrated enough that I want to quit. So with some friend’s advice and help, I took a stand. DDP isn’t the only publisher struggling to make payments. Zenescope owes me thousands of dollars, as well. I just don’t think this kind of behavior toward creators and freelancers is fair and it shouldn’t be okay.

Blaylock responded:

What's necessary, what my life has revolved around for longer than I can remember, what this all comes down to is keeping business going after a serious set-back upon set-back for the company in an extremely difficult time. To keep producing new content while trying to take care of old debts, and my priority in every one of those instances is the creators. THE EASIEST WAY OUT, the easiest thing to do, would just be to shut the company down and whittle away at any corporate debts I personally guaranteed (which does not include a single creator, nor many other vendors). But I haven't. I've kept things going... kept the ship plugging along in an effort to protect the human beings owed instead of the giant corporations taking it all - I can get to them eventually, but it's easier for them to wait it out. That is (or at least seemed to be) the most effective way to still have time to make bigger moves to right the ship more quickly. And despite the negativity, we HAVE been able to take care of a lot of people since initially getting slammed. You just don't hear from them. They don't run out the next day shouting it to the world, and we don't expect them to. I don't expect a cookie for tying my shoes in the morning. In this particular instance, I'll admit it personally stings, because Rachelle's one of the people we were actually still giving work to and paying, even if behind schedule... and recently even paying her in less than a week's time for a coloring job in late December for a super quick turnaround. All the while trying to work out the older bills and this mess of a royalty situation. In this instance the company simply doesn't have money to pay because it never received any money from sales due to massive book store returns from a litany of inventory that was in the pipeline - at least not without picking another creator to take that money away from. She was paid a base amount for the books, but the royalties would have to wait... or she could file suit. I disagree about some of the amount we owe her as well, but it's all apples and oranges at this point.


[2]

Comic series published

Published with Chaos! Comics

Published with Dabel Bros.

Published with eigoMANGA

Published with Kinetic Komicz

Published with Monkey Pharmacy

  • Elsinore #4,5
  • Elsinore: Psycho Sanctii (unreleased)

Published with Studio Ice

  • Megacity 909 #1-8
  • Mu #1-4

Published with Udon

Published with Urban Robot

  • Lo-Fi Magazine #1, 3
  • Lo-Fi Magazine Vol. 2 #4-7

References

See also

External links


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