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Dhatki language: Wikis

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Dhatki
Spoken in Pakistan and India (Marwar region of Rajasthan and Thar region of Sindh)(sociolect)
Total speakers 16,400 million (1997)
Language family Indo-European
Language codes
ISO 639-1 None
ISO 639-2 raj
ISO 639-3 mki

Dhatki, also known as Dhati or Thari, is a language of the Rajasthani macrolanguage, of the Indo-Aryan branch of the Indo-European language family.[1] It is most closely related to Marwari.

Contents

Speakers

Dhatki is spoken in western parts of Jaisalmer and Barmer districts of Rajasthan in India and eastern parts of Sindh province of Pakistan by about 150,000 people in all. Some Dhatki-speaking communities migrated to India in 1947 after the independence and continued to do so in small numbers after that date, but the great majority of Dhatki speakers still reside in Pakistan. Dhatki is spoken by Thari Maheshwaris who are spread across the globe. Other communities which speak Dhatki are Thari Baambhans (Brahmins), Khatri, suthar and Sonara.

The majority speakers of Dhatki language live in Umerkot District and Tharparkar District in Sindh, Pakistan.

Characteristics

Dhatki has implosive consonants.

Samples

A few of the typical sentences in Dhatki are: 1. [tũ ki to kəɾẽ] meaning "What are you doing?", 2. [tɑd͡ʒo nɑ̃ ki əhɛ] meaning "What is your name?", 3. [mɪnɑ ɾoʈi kʰɑɲi əhɛ] meaning "I need to eat". 4. [tũ kɪtʰ pjo d͡ʒɑẽ] where are you going?

References

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Simple English

Dhatki, also known as Dhati or Thari, is a sociolect of Marwari dialect of Rajasthani language. It is spoken in western parts of Jaisalmer and Barmer districts of Rajasthan in the Republic of India and eastern parts of Sindh province of Pakistan. Its characteristic phonological features are glottalized or implosive sounds. Many Dhatki speaking communities migrated to British India in 1947 after the partition and continued to do so in small numbers, but still there is a sizable number of Dhatki speakers in Pakistan.


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